Global Affairs (GLOB1-CE)

GLOB1-CE 21  Impact Investing and Financial Inclusion  (2 Credits)  
<p>Impact investors seek to generate environmental and social impacts in addition to financial returns. This course introduces you to how markets can solve critical social and environmental challenges. While this approach has long been used within the public sector and by NGOs, commercial investors are increasingly embracing this strategy in fields such as energy, water, community development, health, sustainable development, and education. The course draws upon principles of finance, theories of change, public policy, and investment management to evaluate specific cases and investment tools. Of particular focus will be financial inclusion and how efforts to provide the two billion people globally that still lack access to basic financial services is one of the levers with the greatest potential to improve the daily lives of the unbanked and underbanked, while also advancing global economic and social development goals.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>COURSE TOPICS</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><ul><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) Integration and Screening</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Impact Measurement and Future Growth</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>The Rationale for Financial Inclusion</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Public, Private, and Civil Sector Participation in Financial Inclusion</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Emerging Trends in Financial Inclusion</li><br><br></ul><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>This course is eligible towards the completion of the <a href="https://www.sps.nyu.edu/professional-pathways/certificates/global-affairs-and-fundraising/international-development.html">Certificate in International Development</a>. Bundle your coursework and earn a professional credential that communicates knowledge and skills gained. Declared Certificate students receive 10% off of courses within the program.</p><br><br>.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1000  World Politics: The New Global Power Alignments  (2 Credits)  
All over the world, the alignments that have shaped global politics in recent years are changing significantly, and this could have a major impact on the global power structure. The United States is growing apart from its traditional allies in Europe, Canada, and other areas. In Europe, major shifts are taking place within the EU. In Asia, Japan appears to be widening its relationships with China and Russia. The North Korean-American and the North-South Korean connections are taking new shape. The Russia-India nexus is likely to be affected as the India-Pakistan situation becomes more hostile and the Chinese outreach to South Asia expands. In the Middle East, too, power patterns are shifting&mdash;China is expanding its relations with several nations, including Israel. Israel itself is developing new ties in and around the region. Saudi Arabia is forging relations with past adversaries, while breaking with former allies. Similar events are happening in Latin America and Africa. Why are these and similar changes elsewhere taking place? How will they impact world politics and global economics? Is a new world order developing, and if so, how will this affect the US position? Who will be the winners and losers? This course discusses these and other issues in the context of current world events.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1001  World Politics: America and the New World Order  (2 Credits)  
Global politics and economics are going through times of intense change&mdash;old power structures and alignments are eroding and new configurations are rapidly evolving. Unexpected developments in Asia, Latin America, and Africa challenge traditional centers of global strength in the United States and Europe. The Middle East seems on the brink of increased conflict worsened by humanitarian tragedy. Can the rising violence be contained? Trade wars and technological advances are disrupting the old economic order. Now the rise of China and the aggressive policies of Russia challenge the position of the West&mdash;the United States, the European Union, and their ally Japan. How will they react? How will disturbing situations like Iran, North Korea, and Venezuela play into the emerging global balance of power? Can new regional imperatives affect Israel and its allies? What is the impact on nations in the non-Western world? As the Trump administration drastically reshapes foreign policy, can the United States maintain its global position? What new instruments and forces will underwrite the coming era in world affairs? Who will be the winners?
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1002  Global Affairs - Career Pathways to International Organizations  (0 Credits)  
This is the content companion for the English Language Institute program on Career Pathways to International Organizations.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1003  Strategic Snapshots: The Global Response to Trump Foreign Policy  (1 Credit)  
This course will examine the Trump administration from global and regional perspectives. Explore the reaction and adaptation to the US departure from its post-WWII global role&mdash;the turn from multilateralism and new approaches to diplomacy, trade, and defense. A series of regional and political experts will discuss official and public perspectives from abroad, including of the US image and its global leadership role, and they will explore implications for the future. The class will conclude with an expert in-depth examination of 2020 US election issues with a special focus on foreign policy.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1004  Decision-Making in Foreign Affairs  (1 Credit)  
This course is divided into three parts, which cover decision-making on the individual, group, and organizational levels. In the first part, we look at individual-level decision-making, with a focus on cognitive biases and analogies. Next, we move on to group-level decision-making and explore its advantages and drawbacks. Then, we discuss the role played by foreign policy bureaucracies and governmental organizations in foreign policy decisions and contrast these models with the (dominant) realist rational actor model. Throughout the course, we make extensive use of case studies drawn from 20th-century international affairs to illustrate the usefulness of the different models.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1005  The US, EU, and UK: International Relations, Foreign Policy, Trump, and Brexit  (2 Credits)  
Major geopolitical changes are taking place within Europe, and between the United States and Europe. Brexit marks the biggest geopolitical shift in Europe since the fall of the Berlin Wall. After 50 years of growing European integration&mdash;championed by successive US administrations&mdash;the UK&rsquo;s upcoming exit from the EU is the first time any country has left the union. At the same time, European-US relations have become more strained under the Trump administration, as US foreign policy has also become more nationalistic, transactional, and mercantile. Trump has broken with previous US presidents by seeing the EU as a competitor to the US rather than a strategic Western ally. Finally, in Brussels, EU foreign policy is also becoming more fragmented, and the new position of EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy will be filled later this year. This course will focus on the foreign policy and geopolitical aspects of European integration and the transatlantic alliance. It will provide an understanding of the history and reasons for European integration and for the development of a close, strategic European-US relationship&mdash;from 1919 to 2019. It then will look at current challenges to EU integration and to European-US relations, particularly from Brexit and the Trump Administration. This course also will examine why the UK voted to leave the EU, how US foreign policy in general&mdash;and toward Europe in particular&mdash;has shifted under Trump from the approach taken by previous Republican and Democratic presidents, and how UK foreign policy will adapt to being outside the EU.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1006  Fresh Water: A Challenge for the 21st Century  (1 Credit)  
Water is essential to life, and its absence can lead to dire consequences. Even so, governments have underestimated or ignored the central role of this natural resource as a component of the national security paradigm. An inability by nations to provide access to fresh water could cause domestic social and political instability, whose spillover could affect the current world order. The vulnerability of water supply is accentuated by changes in precipitation patterns and increasing populations, which are putting more demands on this resource. This course will take an overall view of water and its sources, distribution, and availability.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1007  Globalization? Stress Testing the Logic of an Interconnected World  (1 Credit)  
This course will provide a framework for understanding the most important political economy question of our day: Will the outcomes of 21st-century globalization conform to the design of 20th-century policymakers? In other words, is the pursuit of rules-based, connected, and interdependent global economic growth still synonymous with global progress? This course will leave you with a robust, cross-disciplinary understanding of what constitutes the driving forces behind&mdash;and the emerging tensions among&mdash;the core factors of globalization. You will learn about the economics, economic history, financial markets, policymaking, and international legal frameworks of a globalized society. Emphasis will be placed on a series of case studies that highlight and explain contemporary financial, economic, and international affairs. As such, the course will illustrate the core principles underpinning the modern world, discussing both their strengths and fragilities in 2020 and beyond.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1008  Energy Modeling Foundations  (1 Credit)  
The electricity industry produces one quarter of the world&rsquo;s CO2 emissions and attracts hundreds of billions of dollars in capital expenditure every year. The business of power is undergoing rapid change. Fracking, renewables, and (possibly) batteries threaten incumbent coal and nuclear generators, and at the grid&rsquo;s edge, a slew of new technologies are empowering consumers to use electricity more cheaply and responsibly. Examine the financial factors that determine what kinds of power plants we build, retire, and &ldquo;dispatch&rdquo; around the world. The central question for investors is how to make money while contributing to an energy transition. In this course, learn to apply fundamental concepts from economics and finance to the power industry. We will use basic math in every class, continuously &ldquo;running the numbers&rdquo; to deepen our understanding of revenues, costs, subsidies, and externalities for different fuel sources under different policy regimes.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1009  Fossil Fuels, Renewable Energy, and the Transition to a Low Carbon Future  (1 Credit)  
This full-day course will explore issues pertaining to the energy transition&mdash;moving from our fossil fuel-driven world to a low carbon, renewable energy future. Students will gain an overview of fossil fuels and the role they play in powering our world. They also will examine the adoption of renewable energy and displacement of fossil fuels in various regions and sectors, with a focus on North America&rsquo;s and Europe&rsquo;s power and transportation sectors. We will analyze the regions that are leading the way in transitioning, thereby uncovering&nbsp;the challenges, difficulties, and successes they have faced in moving away from fossil fuels. Then, students will explore the impact this transition is having on fossil fuel demand and the outlook for these types of energy.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1010  Energy: Past, Present, and Impacts  (1 Credit)  
Fossil fuels generated the standard of living presently enjoyed by developed nations; however, the policies and practices that led to their proliferation also rendered serious harm to the environment and emitted unprecedented levels of greenhouse gases that are expediting changes to the climate. Business as usual is no longer sustainable; yet, how sustainable are emerging policy prescriptions and technology options? This seminar will explore these topics in order to gain an understanding of the nexus between energy, the environment, and climate change.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1011  China's Belt and Road Initiative: Training for Professionals  (1 Credit)  
China&rsquo;s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), introduced by Chinese President Xi Jinping in 2013, is an ambitious strategy that focuses on the nexus of international trade, technology, and global capital markets throughout Asia, Africa, and Europe with the aim of promoting regional integration, increasing trade, and stimulating economic growth. Over the course of two days, participants will gain insight and analysis from leading experts from the private sector, think tanks, and academia on the various aspects of the initiative as they explore how it is impacting commercial and strategic realities on the ground. Topics will include the Chinese macroeconomy and fintech, the US-China trade war, the global energy supply chain, and security implications of BRI.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1012  Energy Modeling Foundations  (1 Credit)  
<p>The electricity industry produces one quarter of the world&rsquo;s CO2 emissions and attracts hundreds of billions of dollars in capital expenditure every year. The business of power is undergoing rapid change. Fracking, renewables, and (possibly) batteries threaten incumbent coal and nuclear generators, and at the grid&rsquo;s edge, a slew of new technologies are empowering consumers to use electricity more cheaply and responsibly. Examine the financial factors that determine what kinds of power plants we build, retire, and &ldquo;dispatch&rdquo; around the world. The central question for investors is how to make money while contributing to an energy transition. In this course, learn to apply fundamental concepts from economics and finance to the power industry. We will use basic math in every class, continuously &ldquo;running the numbers&rdquo; to deepen our understanding of revenues, costs, subsidies, and externalities for different fuel sources under different policy regimes.</p><br><br><br><br><p><strong>COURSE TOPICS:</strong></p><br><br><br><br><p><strong><meta charset="utf-8" /></strong></p><br><br><br><br><ul dir="ltr"><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Global power markets</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Power modeling applications&nbsp;</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Cash flow modeling for power plants</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Asset valuation</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Fundamental and financial modeling of power generation assets</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Modeling renewable, gas, and coal economics</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Battery dispatch optimization</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Gas markets</li><br><br></ul>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1013  Brexit: Cause, Course, and Consequence  (1.5 Credits)  
<p>Taught by a former&nbsp;British trade official, this unique course will explain the causes and implications of the United Kingdom&#39;s (UK) exit from the European Union (EU). How could it be that a free-trading market economy would decide to leave the largest trading bloc in the world? How will Europe respond? And how will the transatlantic economy develop in the coming decade? This course will examine how and why this decision, known as Brexit, was made, as well as how the process developed between 2016 and 2020. The course will also explore the forward implications of Brexit for the United States (US) and its alliances in 2021 and beyond. These implications include an emergent gap between the political&nbsp;and economic&nbsp;aspects of free market political economies in the 21st century; how America&#39;s allies and partners are changing, from shifts in the UK&#39;s&nbsp;constitutional settlement to the acceleration&nbsp;of EU and euro area developments; the core importance of the international financial system in the transatlantic political economy; and&nbsp;Brexit as a litmus test for future globalization as trade blocs and countries both embrace and challenge globalization.&nbsp;</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1014  Global Uncertainty: Money, Diplomacy, and Technological Change in the 21st Century World  (1 Credit)  
<p>What should we expect from the 21st century? A period of Great Power war, similar to the 20th century, or a long and commercial peace, similar to the 19th? Explore the timely and critical issues facing the international community, from artificial intelligence to Sino-American naval tensions, trade wars to the pandemic, financial systems to climate change, and more. Examine the main methods governments, businesses, and individuals have developed for coping with ongoing global flux. Using history, economics, and international relations consider examples, patterns, and frameworks to help make sense of the present and future.</p><br><br>&nbsp;<br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1015  Spies at War: Fact vs. Fiction  (1 Credit)  
<p><strong>Register for this Fall 2023 course on the new <a href="https://nyusps.gatherlearning.com/events/spies-at-war-fact-vs-fiction---fall-2023">NYU SPS Academy of Lifelong Learning</a> website.</strong></p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>World War II was a critical challenge for the intelligence services of the major powers, laying the groundwork for espionage during the Cold War and beyond. Explore the vital role of intelligence in the conflict itself and as a proving ground for the future. Discuss the intelligence operations of the major allied powers - Great Britain, The United States, and the Soviet Union - with an emphasis on espionage, analysis, propaganda and sabotage.&nbsp; While Great Britain and the Soviet Union possessed established and professional intelligence organizations from the outset of the war, the US started largely from scratch.&nbsp; Learn about the creation of the Office of Strategic Services, the forerunner of the Central Intelligence Agency, and how the US developed its vital intelligence capabilities in the crucible of world war.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>Taught by a veteran intelligence professional, the course will blend analysis of non-fictional sources with a critical reading of selected works of fiction in a series of eight facilitated discussions.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p><strong>Fall 2023 tuition is $525.</strong></p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1016  Midway to the Midterms: Politics, Priorities, and Policy  (1 Credit)  
<p>Almost a year into the Biden administration and with the congressional midterm elections next year, the United States continues to face serious tests of its democratic foundations, fractures in its political system, and a series of critical policy issues. Explore the dynamics among these threats and the implications for the 2022 congressional elections and beyond. Examine current administration and congressional relationships, the political parties, challenges to governance, and potential national outcomes. Analyze the US electorate, the states of the political parties internally and competitively, threats to the democratic order, and the ongoing national campaign to suppress the vote. Delve into the developing political party primaries in strategic and ideological terms and their potential effect on the future of the parties, the Congress and the country. Learn more about the Biden administration policy accomplishments and challenges, including a special focus on the global &ldquo;Biden Doctrine&rdquo; &ndash; its substance, accomplishments, obstacles, domestic political significance and implications for the US global role. Consider this in a global context through a comparative review of the state of liberal democracies around the world.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1017  Economic Growth and Poverty Reduction  (2 Credits)  
<p>This course will examine the economic challenges poor countries face and the strategies proposed to deal with them, beginning with an analysis of the ways in which the global trading system and the international financial system operate. It will then review the factors affecting the flow of investment capital to developing countries, either as official development assistance or as private investment, with particular attention to the roles of the United Nations, the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, transnational corporations and governments of both developed and developing countries. Finally, it will consider the Sustainable Development Goals and how countries are progressing towards or struggling to meet their economic growth and poverty reduction goals.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>This course is eligible towards the completion of the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.sps.nyu.edu/professional-pathways/certificates/global-affairs-and-fundraising/international-development.html">Certificate in International Development</a>.&nbsp;Bundle your coursework and earn a professional credential that communicates knowledge and skills gained. Declared Certificate students receive 10% off of courses within the program.&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1018  Disaster Preparedness and Humanitarian Assistance  (2 Credits)  
<p>In order to achieve the key UN Sustainable Development goals of &quot;No Poverty, Zero Hunger, Good Health and Wellbeing, Gender Equality, Clean Water and Sanitation, Decent Work and Economic Growth, and Disaster Risk Reduction,&quot; sovereign governments, the international community, and non-governmental organizations need to be able to respond to rapid onset disasters with appropriate and swift humanitarian action while at the same time considering the long-term challenges of developing sound disaster risk reduction mechanisms and emergency mitigation systems. The first portion of this course will investigate both the natural and made-made causes of disasters requiring humanitarian assistance as well as the mechanisms put in place to rapidly respond to disasters.&nbsp; This portion of the course will further focus on the challenges of responding to humanitarian crises including logistical challenges, meeting the needs of refugees and internally displaced persons (IDPs), infusing protection/reducing gender-based violence (GBV) in responses, as well as the challenges inherent to delivering humanitarian aid within complex environments and bureaucratic systems. The second portion of this course will focus on how humanitarian actors, at all levels, are moving towards a more resilience focused model of ensuring that disaster preparedness is not limited to direct aid. As such, this course will analyze the sustainability of long-term disaster risk reduction and early warning systems to reduce the impact of potential disasters.&nbsp; Finally, this course will touch on the use of updated technologies in humanitarian disaster response, how humanitarian assistance has reshaped the construct of national sovereignty, and the ethical challenges associated with humanitarian aid and development.</p><br><br><br><br><p><meta charset="utf-8" /></p><br><br><br><br><p dir="ltr"><strong>COURSE TOPICS</strong></p><br><br><br><br><ul dir="ltr"><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Drivers of Humanitarian Aid and Assistance</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Protection Elements, Women&rsquo;s Equality, and Gender Bias Violence</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Differences between humanitarian aid and humanitarian development&nbsp;</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>The Humanitarian Development Nexus&nbsp;</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Technology in Humanitarian Aid</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Implementing Humanitarian Aid and Development Projects&nbsp;</li><br><br></ul><br><br><br><br><p>This course is eligible towards the completion of the <a href="https://www.sps.nyu.edu/professional-pathways/certificates/global-affairs-and-fundraising/global-affairs.html">Certificate in Global Affairs</a> or the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.sps.nyu.edu/professional-pathways/certificates/global-affairs-and-fundraising/international-development.html">Certificate in International Development</a> (please note, this course can only be used towards one Certificate). Bundle your coursework and earn a professional credential that communicates knowledge and skills gained. Declared Certificate students receive 10% off of courses within the program.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1020  Global Health and Development  (2 Credits)  
<p>The world has made immense strides in improving health outcomes and increasing life-expectancy over the past century in large part due to improved medicine, infrastructure and technology transfer between nations. However, these gains have been uneven. Many populations continue to face challenges across key metrics such as maternal and child mortality, burden of infectious and chronic disease, and life-expectancy. This course will offer students an overview of the most important health challenges facing the world today. Students will be introduced to key topics important to global health including historical roots of global health initiatives; national and international health systems; measures of disease burden; determinants of health outcomes; key global health initiatives and funding mechanisms. The course will also provide exposure to technical skills areas relevant to global health, including epidemiology; assessing the scientific rigor of evidence; advocacy; program planning; theory of change; and program performance measurement.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>This course is eligible towards the completion of the <a href="https://www.sps.nyu.edu/professional-pathways/certificates/global-affairs/international-development.html">Certificate in International Development</a>. Bundle your coursework and earn a professional credential that communicates knowledge and skills gained. Declared Certificate students receive 10% off of courses within the program.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1023  Scenarios Planning  (2 Credits)  
<p>The course addresses scenarios as a forecasting and planning tool. In a turbulent world, organizations-in public and private sectors-must make vital decisions for an uncertain future. How does my company construct a global supply chain that delivers efficiency without incurring excessive risk? What technologies should I invest in? Should my government shift its resources towards Asia, and how can I mitigate the risk that other regions could become vital to my security? Facing fateful decisions in uncertainty, organizations make two types of mistakes: they assume a future that extrapolates the past, reinforcing status quo policies and blinding them to potentially disruptive events; or they refuse to decide, hoping for a clarity that never comes and forfeiting their leverage. They are blind-sided by their own assumptions, or cede the field to more agile actors. The scenario approach embraces forecasting as essential to strategy development and risk management, but challenges conventional assumptions about the future and incorporates imagination into the forecasting process. To make maximum and effective use of scenarios, two elements are essential, and these elements form the backbone of this course. One relates to the quality of the scenarios themselves.The second element is related to the scenarios&rsquo; utility for the organization.</p><br><br><br><br><p><meta charset="utf-8" /></p><br><br><br><br><p dir="ltr"><strong>COURSE TOPICS</strong></p><br><br><br><br><ul dir="ltr"><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Foundations of Scenarios Frameworks</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Criteria and Options for Constructing Scenarios&nbsp;</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Presenting Scenarios and Shaping Content and Construction&nbsp;</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Strategies for Anticipating Change, Managing Risk, and Testing Alternate Strategies Through Case Studies</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Mainstreaming Frameworks For Organizations</li><br><br></ul>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1024  Human Rights and Development  (2 Credits)  
<p>A rights-based approach to development has become increasingly central in explaining and addressing the underlying issues related to economic, social and political development. This approach focuses on the rights of the individual, enshrined in international human rights laws, as key enablers of economics, social and political development. This course will examine the rights-based approach and how it drives human development by empowering people to expand their choices and capabilities. It will also provide an introduction to international human rights laws (including special laws for the protection of children, women, racial minorities, and other groups), with particular attention paid to international economic, social, and cultural rights, including the human rights to food, health, housing, education, and work.</p><br><br><br><br><p style="margin-bottom:11px"><strong><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="line-height:107%"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">COURSE TOPICS:</span></span></span></strong></p><br><br><br><br><ul><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li style="margin-left:8px"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="line-height:107%"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Introduction to Human Rights and Development</span></span></span></li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li style="margin-left:8px"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="line-height:107%"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">The Structures and Systems of International Human Rights </span></span></span></li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li style="margin-left:8px"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="line-height:107%"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Key Actors in Human Rights </span></span></span></li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li style="margin-left:8px"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="line-height:107%"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Civil and Political Rights</span></span></span></li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li style="margin-left:8px"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="line-height:107%"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights </span></span></span></li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li style="margin-bottom:11px; margin-left:8px"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="line-height:107%"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">The Nexus of Human Rights and Development </span></span></span></li><br><br></ul>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1025  Managing Risk and Uncertainty  (2 Credits)  
<p>Operating in conditions of uncertainty can be disorienting and bewildering.&nbsp; A risk-informed approach can allow global leaders to make informed decisions, assign priorities and develop comprehensive treatment strategies, as they appreciate and anticipate threats and vulnerabilities, as well as their concomitant probabilities and consequences.&nbsp; Regardless of the particular field (from international security, to world politics, to the global economy, to the planet&rsquo;s changing climate) understanding the fundamentals&mdash;both pro and con&mdash;of risk, its assessment, and treatments is vital to producing robust and resilient strategies. This course prepares global leaders and professionals to understand, evaluate, and manage risk no matter what their goals.&nbsp; Explore a number of key risk concepts and frameworks, examine illustrative cases, and develop components of a risk assessment and treatment plan. <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BN7NnHyNUGI&amp;t=2s">Hear more about the course from the faculty co-developers</a>.</p><br><br><br><br><p><meta charset="utf-8" /></p><br><br><br><br><p dir="ltr"><strong>COURSE TOPICS</strong></p><br><br><br><br><ul><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Understanding Risk and Uncertainty</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Assessing and Evaluating Risk</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Trading Risk</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Conducting a Risk Treatment/Management Plan</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Pathologies of Risk and Exploring Resilience&nbsp;</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Best Practices and Strategies Through Case Studies</li><br><br></ul>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1026  The Deeper Dive: Global Issues and US Politics in Uncertain Times  (0.5 Credits)  
<p>As media and rapidly changing events increasingly focus us on the immediate and short-term, we&rsquo;ll step back to look at consequential trends and developments that will determine our common global future, the future of the US democratic system, and our political and social well-being. Examine the intersection of critical global challenges and US interests, and administration, congressional and judicial responses. Look at such issues as climate and pollution; the emerging global balance of power; nuclear proliferation; the state of alliances; the decline of democratic governance; cyber-security, social media and disinformation; borders, migration and immigration; and food and health. Explore the impact of religious persecution on political stability in such countries as Russia, Pakistan and China; the future of regional alliances like NATO and ASEAN and the implications for the future of European and Asian democracies; and China&rsquo;s strategic posture.&nbsp;Consider the Biden administration foreign and domestic policies in response to these substantive and strategic challenges, congressional equities, and the state of the judiciary.&nbsp;Foci will serve as backdrops to consideration of issues and strategies in the 2022 and 2024 US elections, of the long-term futures of the Democratic and Republican parties, and of the consequences for the US political system and for the world.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p><strong>Registered students will have the option to participate in this course onsite at our NYU SPS Midtown Center or virtually via Zoom.</strong></p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p><strong>Students attending onsite courses will need to upload proof of vaccination to the NYU portal and show a &quot;Green&quot; Daily Screener pass upon entry to the campus. Students will also be required to follow any mask requirements or COVID-related protocols in place. Registered students will receive more information via email in January about accessing the campus. A smartphone is required to use the Daily Screener app.</strong></p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1027  Politics and Leadership in a Changing Middle East  (1.5 Credits)  
<p>This course will look at the historical and ideological legacies that influence politics and leadership in the Middle East. It will cover the broader Middle East, including Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Israel, and Turkey. The politics and state society relations in selected countries will be presented primarily through the words and actions of individual leaders.&nbsp;Relations among the countries in the region will also be covered.&nbsp;Questions to be discussed include: What pre-colonial and colonial legacies influence politics? What role does Islam play in politics and state/society relations? What are national and transnational identities, which serve as major factors in the politics of the Middle East? In selected sessions, the role of prominent women will be added to the mix of leading figures.</p><br><br><br><br><p dir="ltr">&nbsp;</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1028  From Frontline to Headline: The 'War About the War' in Afghanistan  (0 Credits)  
<p><strong>Register for this Spring 2023 course on the <a href="https://nyusps.gatherlearning.com/events/from-frontline-to-headline-the-war-about-the-war-in-afghanistan---spring-2023">NYU SPS Academy of Lifelong Learning</a> website.</strong></p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>Multiple frontlines beset contemporary global geopolitics.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>In Ukraine, Russia&rsquo;s invasion is faltering, triggering fears of nuclear escalation. In East Asia, China&rsquo;s plans for Taiwan seem to be advancing into a pre-invasion stage. And in South Asia, the Taliban regime which replaced the US-backed dispensation has entered its second year &mdash; with alarming signs that it still supports international terrorism. Meanwhile, North Korea continues to test advanced nuclear-delivery systems, Iran maintains its nuclear ambitions, and new terrorist networks emerge in Africa, triggering a wave of coups and mercenary warfare, all as cyberespionage expands and cybercrime morphs into a global cyberterror threat.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>How do we unpack all those conflicts? Simply, through those whose job it is to watch, analyze and cover them.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>In this course, we drill down on one major conflict &mdash; Afghanistan &mdash; and explore the impact of the US pullout, a year-and-a-half after it was completed.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>Lectures will include insights from experts who cover, examine, and continue to engage in and negotiate with the Afghan conflict -- from the frontline -- as well as those who bring their findings from there to you -- through the headline.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>Though it is now in its fifth decade of unrest, we will review &lsquo;post-American Afghanistan&rsquo; through the critical lens of contemporary international, national, and social media narratives.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>We will examine how the narration, coverage and broadcasting of security and conflict have become a part of our national conversation and how they&rsquo;ve affected international relations since the last American soldier walked away from America&rsquo;s longest war.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>We will delve into what happens when the reporting ends and the debate begins, and how conflict further develops from there.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>We will learn more about the players and organizations shaping global security dynamics &mdash; from new alliances like the Quad and AUKUS, to rejuvenated ones like NATO &mdash; from the practitioners who cover them, and officials who have served them.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>Think of this course as eight weeks of deep diving into the debate about Afghanistan &mdash; the war about the war -- with weekly inputs and exchanges from the best global experts in the business of conflict, and/or covering it.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p><strong>Spring 2023 tuition is $499.</strong></p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1029  Foundational Statistics  (2.5 Credits)  
<p>This course will provide a practical, hands-on foundation in basic statistical analysis for the interpretation data. Topics include descriptive statistics, frequency distributions, probability theory, correlation, regression analysis, probability distributions, normal distributions, central limit theorem, t-distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, chi-square test, and one-way analysis of variance.</p><br><br><br><br><p><strong>COURSE TOPICS</strong></p><br><br><br><br><ul><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Introduction to data-driven decision-making</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Data types</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Sample vs. Population</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Data collection methods</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Data organization through tables and graphs</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Descriptive statistics Central tendency (mean, median, mode, minimum, maximum, range, histograms)</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Variability (interquartile range, standard deviation)</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Basic probability</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Central limit theorem, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Inferential statistics</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>T-tests, ANOVA, correlation, linear and multiple regression</li><br><br></ul><br><br><br><br><p>This course is eligible towards the completion of the <a href="https://www.sps.nyu.edu/professional-pathways/certificates/global-affairs-and-fundraising/data-analytics.html">Certificate in Data Analytics</a>. Bundle your coursework and earn a professional credential that communicates knowledge and skills gained. Declared Certificate students receive 10% off of courses within the program.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 1040  The United States: The World's Liberal Hegemon, But Why?  (1 Credit)  
<p>The United States is seen by its friends and enemies as the world&rsquo;s liberal hegemon, the &quot;cop.&quot; But why the United States? What attributes does it possess to hold such a role? Are some of these attributes no longer suitable for our current world? Is the United States unlike Great Britain in the 19th century,&nbsp;the reluctant hegemon? Secretary of State Blinken stated that the &ldquo;world does not organize itself,&rdquo; and former Secretary of State Albright often stated that the United States is&nbsp;the &ldquo;indispensable nation.&rdquo;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>Does the world need the United States playing this role? Explore the role of the hegemon, what happened to the idea of the balance of power, and examine why multilateral organizations such as the United Nations can&#39;t &ldquo;organize the world.&rdquo; Examine how the United States became the liberal hegemon and the unique advantages and disadvantages of filling this role.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 2000  Political Thought and Life: From Plato to Climate Change  (1 Credit)  
<p>Political theory is often viewed as overly philosophical, abstract, and inapplicable to contemporary life. Our goal in this course will be to debunk these beliefs by bringing core readings from the tradition of classic political thought into conversation with our world today.&nbsp; The key theme of this course is that philosophical texts are, indeed, more relevant today than ever, and can help us to address some of the pressing challenges we face as individuals and as a society.&nbsp; In a series of eight sessions, we will discuss a range of accessible readings from the political theory canon.&nbsp; For example, we will read Plato&rsquo;s &#39;Allegory of the Cave&#39; and compare it to aspects of social media; we will examine short passages from Machiavelli&rsquo;s The Prince through the lens of the recent rise in autocratic leaders in America and abroad; and we will juxtapose Kant&rsquo;s &#39;What Is Enlightenment?&#39; with issues in contemporary environmental activism, and more. Each week we will link classical readings in political thought with life as we experience it today.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 2001  The Global Economy and Financial Markets: Making Sense of News Headlines  (1 Credit)  
<p><strong>Register for this course on the&nbsp;<a href="https://nyusps.gatherlearning.com/events/the-global-economy-and-financial-markets-making-sense-of-news-headlines---spring-2024">NYU SPS Academy of Lifelong Learning</a> website.</strong></p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>Deciphering economic and financial terminology can be challenging but is critical to understanding how the global markets work. This course gets behind news headlines to develop basic knowledge of macroeconomics, financial markets, and international political economy in order to understand the important issues contained in news reports in&nbsp;publications such as The Economist and the FT. Taking current news stories found in the financial press as a starting point, we may cover current issues in: monetary and fiscal policy; inflation, interest rates, exchange rates and reserve currencies; trade, financial flows, and the balance of payments; banking systems, event risk, and the risks of investing across borders. Timely topics covered by financial&nbsp;journalists will be discussed against the backdrop of core economic&nbsp;and financial concepts.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p><strong>Spring 2024 tuition is $525.</strong></p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 2003  ESG and Impact Investing Boot Camp  (1 Credit)  
<p>ESG (Environmental, Social and Governance) and Impact Investing are garnering increased attention and scrutiny on Wall Street and in Washington as investors seek to better understand how ongoing crises such as climate change and social inequality will affect their portfolios and public policy. Based on the assumption that all investments have impact, both positive and negative, ESG/impact investing seeks to provide asset owners with the tools to understand and guide their investments toward positive social and environmental outcomes. ESG/impact investing is part of a larger historical phenomenon of integrating values into investment decisions such as early religion-based investing to the more recent role of divestment in key social and environmental movements, such as apartheid-era South Africa and fossil fuels. Yet, there is much misunderstanding and misinformation about these tools and practices.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>In this one-day in-person intensive ESG/impact Investing Boot Camp, you will learn the foundational frameworks and approaches which have been developed to integrate ESG factors and impact investing strategies into the investment decision-making process. We will define impact investing and apply it across a wide array of approaches and asset classes. You will leave with the capacity to unpack the structure of specific ESG/impact investments and be a more engaged consumer of investment information.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>This course is designed for those who want to better understand how investment mechanisms can be structured to solve critical social and environmental challenges. The bootcamp will draw from the fields of finance, microeconomics, theories of change, public policy, impact measurement and management, and investment management to evaluate specific cases and investment tools in areas such as climate and addressing inequality.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>It is recommended that participants have a foundational knowledge of finance and investment.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 3001  Financial Inclusion at the Base of the Pyramid: Key Actors, Concepts, and Trends at the Intersection  (1 Credit)  
<p>Over the past three decades, billions of people have been lifted from poverty. Despite great progress, however, nearly two billion still lack access to basic financial services. They have no checking account, savings account, or credit. They have no insurance or financial identity. In short, they have no financial security. Financial exclusion&mdash;or the lack of access to formal financial services&mdash;detrimentally impacts a person&rsquo;s quality of life, denying the person access to the same opportunities, benefits, and choices many of us take for granted.<br /><br><br><br /><br><br>A wide range of public, nonprofit, and private entities undertake initiatives to deliver financial services to the base of the pyramid,<small><sup>1</sup></small> often with mixed results. Nevertheless, financial inclusion<small><sup>2</sup></small> is one of the levers with the greatest potential to improve the daily lives of the unbanked and underbanked, while also advancing global economic and social development goals.<br /><br><br><br /><br><br>This course will shine a spotlight on financial inclusion by dissecting the ecosystem of entities delivering financial services at the base of the pyramid. It will assess the strategies and approaches used to promote financial inclusion (including what has worked and what hasn&rsquo;t). The course will also analyze the tools and technologies with the greatest potential to support financial inclusion efforts. Finally, we&rsquo;ll close the course by exploring how emerging trends, including COVID-19, are affecting financial inclusion efforts globally.<br /><br><br><br /><br><br><small>1. For the purposes of this course, &ldquo;base of the pyramid&rdquo; refers to individuals living at the bottom of the economic pyramid in terms of their wealth and income ownership.</small></p><br><br><br><br><p><small>2. &ldquo;Financial inclusion&rdquo; means that individuals and businesses have access to useful and affordable financial products and services that meet their needs (transactions, payments, savings, credit, and insurance) delivered in a responsible and sustainable way (World Bank definition).</small></p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 3002  Modern Leadership and Resilience: A Goal-Focused and Human-Centered Approach  (1 Credit)  
<p dir="ltr">Whether you work in a frontline humanitarian assistance organization or think tank, the public or private sector, the science of leadership skills and resilience practices are essential to being an effective leader and manager. No matter your role or title, you have the ability to impact your organization. As a leader, you have the opportunity to promote, through your words and actions, a success-driven environment while also supporting a culture of dignity and respect for everyone. Drawing upon established research, both are possible and you will gain insight into specific practices that support each of them. During this full-day interactive workshop, you will get plenty of opportunities to practice them in a professional setting that will be both challenging (just the right amount!) and enjoyable. You will hear from fellow participants, share your own insights, and engage in practices to help further develop your leadership abilities, manage disputes and conflicts, and strategies to enhance your well-being and others.</p><br><br><br><br><div>&nbsp;</div><br><br><br><br><div>&nbsp;</div>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 3070  Moscow: Security, Stress, and Stability in the New Russia  (0 Credits)  
<p>This is the noncredit course shell for GLOB1-GC3070 Moscow GFI for the M.S. in Global Affairs program</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 4000  UN Tools  (0 Credits)  
Workshop for training new delegates to the UN
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 5000  The President, the Congress, the Courts, and The States: Conflict, Cooperation and 2024  (1 Credit)  
<p><b><span style="border:none windowtext 1.0pt; font-size:10.5pt; padding:0in"><span style="background:white"><span style="line-height:107%"><span arial="" style="font-family:"><span style="color:#202124">Register for this Spring 2023 course on the new </span></span></span></span></span></b><a href="https://nyusps.gatherlearning.com/events/the-president-the-congress-the-courts-and-the-states-conflict-cooperation-and-2024---spring-2023"><b><span style="border:none windowtext 1.0pt; font-size:10.5pt; padding:0in"><span style="line-height:107%"><span arial="" style="font-family:">NYU SPS Academy of Lifelong Learning</span></span></span></b></a><b><span style="font-size:10.5pt"><span style="background:white"><span style="line-height:107%"><span arial="" style="font-family:"><span style="color:#202124"> website.</span></span></span></span></span></b></p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>The 2022 political dynamic will set the stage for the two years of national, state and local politics culminating in the 2024 election.&nbsp;&nbsp;The &ldquo;new normals&rdquo; in the power of the presidency, the effectiveness of the Congress, and in Supreme Court ideology have created an uncertain political future. American federalism is in flux.&nbsp;&nbsp;State legislatures are becoming increasingly important on issues including guns, the environment, abortion, voting rights, and election legitimacy.&nbsp;&nbsp;These US developments are playing out as global affairs become increasingly uncertain.&nbsp;&nbsp;The course will explore this changing landscape and its implications for the 2024 election, and for the stability and success of the US political system going forward.<br /><br><br><br /><br><br><strong>Spring 2023 tuition is $425.</strong></p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 5001  Data Analytics for Public Policy and Social Good  (2 Credits)  
<p>Typically associated with business and tech, analytics is quickly being adopted as a vital tool for government and nonprofit organizations to maximize their impact while dealing with small teams and constrained budgets. This course will show how organizations produce or procure meaningful data, as well as teach how the tools and methods of data analytics are used to inform decision-making in the public sector. It will identify the ways in which data can be used to drive decisions related to spending, organizational efficiency, and reporting.&nbsp;</p><br><br>&nbsp;<br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>Along with sections of the course centered on policy-making and nonprofit work, the class will take a focused look at performance management in local government, which has received a lot of attention as we deal with issues of crime and policing in our communities. The collection and release of data on law enforcement and other essential government activities will be evaluated, and students will learn how to build visualizations of trends in government service delivery to help evaluate outcomes.&nbsp;</p><br><br>&nbsp;<br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>This class will help students understand how organizations and analysts should leverage data&ndash;&ndash;including what kind of measurements they should focus on or ignore&ndash;&ndash;in order to help transform society for the better.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>COURSE TOPICS:</p><br><br><br><br><ul><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li aria-level="1">Applied statistics, including descriptive analysis related to impact assessment</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li aria-level="1">Common analytical techniques (e.g., percentiles) deployed in the social sciences</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li aria-level="1">Understanding different dimensions of data and differentiating between cross-sectional and longitudinal studies</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li aria-level="1">Data visualization and presentation techniques (histograms, column/row charts, tables, etc)</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li aria-level="1">Quality assurance approaches (e.g., PDSA and CQI)</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li aria-level="1">Testing and assessment design</li><br><br></ul>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 5003  Voices of the Modern Middle East  (1.5 Credits)  
<p><strong>Register for this Spring 2023 course on the new <a href="https://nyusps.gatherlearning.com/events/voices-of-the-modern-middle-east---spring-2023">NYU SPS Academy of Lifelong Learning</a> website.</strong></p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>This course will use the lens of fiction and non-fiction short stories, essays, and book chapters to study the modern Middle East. It will include one film (fiction or documentary &ndash; to be determined).</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>Drawing on the work of authors from Morocco to Pakistan, the course will address the following questions:</p><br><br><br><br><p>Who are the authors? What are their personal stories?</p><br><br><br><br><p>What do selected fiction and non-fiction stories reveal about politics, economics, and society in the broader Middle East?</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>Possible authors include Azar Nafisi (Iran), Naguib Mahfouz (Egypt), Hisham Matar (Libya), Salman Rushdie (Pakistan), Samar Yazbek (Syria) and possibly one Yemeni and one Palestinian author.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>Recurring themes in the class will be conflict, life in exile, and Middle East tensions with the West, as many of the authors have left the region voluntarily or out of necessity.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p><strong>Spring 2023 tuition is $499.</strong></p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 5005  The Crisis of Security: Global Politics from the End of the Cold War to the Present  (1 Credit)  
<p>In 1991 the world witnessed the triumph of Liberal Democracy with the fall of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War. This was the Age of Optimism which proclaimed a New World Order built on pax Americana and the values of the West. From 2016 to 2022, this paradigm of Western Power has been thrown into an existential crisis. This is the Age of Anxiety. How has it come to this? This course will examine current crises through the lens of history and the context of events in the post-Cold War world, especially the rise of populism, internal and external threats to democracy in the West, the growing threat of authoritarian leaders and the emergence of global economic recession. It will focus specifically on a number of core issues: Russia&rsquo;s resurgence under Putin and the crisis in Ukraine; the rise of China under Xi Jinping and the threat to Asian security over Taiwan; enduring crisis in the Middle East and the instability caused by the failure of regional actors to resolve the Palestinian question, extinguish the threat of religious extremism or contain the nuclear ambitions of Iran. This course will pose many essential questions, which will enhance our understanding of the origins of international conflict. It will also focus on any new developments which may emerge in international affairs during the duration of the course.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 5006  Youth Assembly Climate Entrepreneurship Track  (1 Credit)  
<p style="margin-bottom:11px"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="line-height:107%"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Few issues are as complex and multifaceted as climate change. Meeting the many pressing challenges that climate change presents, and is forecast to present, is an urgent, global priority. According to the Yale Center for Business and the Environment, &ldquo;the world needs leaders in all sectors who can connect the massive economic opportunity of clean energy to the moral imperatives of addressing climate change and protecting all communities and ecosystems.&rdquo; And this is where you come in. The Youth Assembly Climate Entrepreneurship track will help emerging leaders address and connect the moral imperative and opportunity. For a young entrepreneur, it is a once-in-a-generation calling.</span></span></span></p><br><br><br><br><p style="margin-bottom:11px">&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p style="margin-bottom:11px">&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p style="margin-bottom:11px"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="line-height:107%"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Breakthrough Energy, a venture founded by Bill Gates to invest in startup companies accelerating innovation in sustainable energy, identifies &ldquo;five grand challenges&rdquo; that will need to be tackled to mitigate or prevent the worst-case scenario impacts of climate change: how we plugin, make things, grow things, get around, keep cool, and stay warm. They note that tackling these will require, &ldquo;unprecedented technological transformations in almost every sector of modern life&rdquo;. The undertaking is both critical and massive, but if done right, &ldquo;also a major economic opportunity that can promote growth, create jobs, and accelerate the transition to low-carbon development in a wide range of sectors,&rdquo; according to the International Finance Corporation.</span></span></span></p><br><br><br><br><p style="margin-bottom:11px">&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p style="margin-bottom:11px">&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p style="margin-bottom:11px"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="line-height:107%"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">We need climate entrepreneurs. By responding to specific problems, demands, or gaps in the market, climate entrepreneurs help identify and pursue opportunities that deliver environmental benefits for the communities they serve and the world.</span></span></span></p><br><br><br><br><p style="margin-bottom:11px">&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p style="margin-bottom:11px">&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p style="margin-bottom:11px"><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="line-height:107%"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">This special track at the Youth Assembly will give participants first-hand and theoretical knowledge of founding, financing, and growing a startup in climate change-focused sectors, providing young people with an intensive, hands-on entrepreneurship education and leadership development training covering a range of climate-focused areas.</span></span></span></p><br><br><br><br><p style="margin-bottom:11px">&nbsp;</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 6000  The Clean Energy Ecosystem  (3 Credits)  
<p>The clean energy landscape is complex, multifaceted, and evolving. Emerging technologies and grid modernization are reshaping the sector in addition to exciting innovation and critical policies to meet aggressive decarbonization targets. But how do all of these components of the ecosystem interact? Gain a practical understanding of how the various areas of and players within the energy sector operate and interact within the marketplace. Case studies and guest speakers will provide insight into the commercialization process of new technologies and how large-scale utilities work with smaller-scale energy firms to provide reliable and clean energy to consumers. Explore considerations and financing for renewable energy generation, transmission, distribution, and storage projects.</p><br><br><br><br><p>COURSE TOPICS:</p><br><br><br><br><ul><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Commercialization and partnerships</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Clean energy project finance</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Market assessment</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Emerging technologies and innovation</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Energy systems</li><br><br></ul>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 7001  Global Human Rights Through Film and Literature  (1 Credit)  
<p>This course will examine visual and literary representations of human rights and humanitarian issues. Using both film screenings and written texts, we will examine the role of storytelling and imagery in the human rights movement and the continued interconnectedness of media and advocacy in some of today&#39;s most pressing human rights issues. This course will explore the history of human rights, how representations affect public recognition of rights and wrongs, as well as challenges and opportunities for advocacy. Case studies include Argentina, the Holocaust, Rwanda, and Cambodia.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 8000  Energy Analytics, Modeling, and ClimateTech Finance  (3 Credits)  
<p>The Clean Energy transition has undergone explosive growth in recent years and that pace is accelerating - creating market dynamics that are complex, multifaceted, and evolving. This course will teach you the analytical skills, fundamentals of the energy markets Climate Technologies, energy data analysis, and how to apply those skills and knowledge to make informed decisions about energy investments, financing and how to thrive personally and professionally during the energy transition to a decarbonized world.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>Emerging technologies, grid modernization, and decarbonization are transforming the global economy in a new Industrial Revolution that represents one of the biggest economic growth engines of the next 30 years. To understand how these trends and policies will impact the economy, the environment, and our future requires not just knowledge and understanding of the technologies, market ecosystems, and economic trends, but the ability to understand and contextualize energy data. This course provides an overview of the cleantech sector technologies, policies, and markets and teaches the fundamentals of interpretation and data analysis that is vital to understand how the energy sector is evolving and where it will go.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p><strong>WE NEED MORE POWER! OR IS IT ENERGY?</strong></p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p><strong>TOPIC AREAS:</strong></p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><ul><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Using economics and data to understand Energy Markets and the future of Energy</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Policy impacts on the Energy Ecosystem &amp; Energy Transition</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Quantitative and qualitative analysis tools to use Energy Data to assess the Energy Transition</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Energy Systems; Emerging technologies, and innovation (e.g. NYU&#39;s Urban Future Lab!)</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Commercialization, scaling, and partnerships in ClimateTech</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Financing Clean Energy (Equity, Debt, Projects &amp; how it differs from Fossil Fuels)</li><br><br></ul>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 8001  BRICS: The Rise of Geopolitical and Economic Influencers  (1 Credit)  
<p style="margin-bottom:11px"><strong><span style="font-size:11pt"><span style="line-height:107%"><span style="font-family:Calibri,sans-serif">Register for this Fall 2023 course on the <a href="https://nyusps.gatherlearning.com/events/brics-the-rise-of-geopolitical-and-economic-influencers---fall-2023-in-person">NYU SPS Academy of Lifelong Learning</a> website.</span></span></span></strong></p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>In 2001, an investment banker coined the term BRICS to represent the economic optimism for emerging economies global economies in Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa, however, two decades later, only China has exceeded growth expectations. Because of this, the BRICS grouping appeared to be inconsequential but recently these five countries are propelling a new geopolitical and economic realignment. What has been the impact of the&nbsp;Russian invasion of&nbsp;Ukraine?&nbsp; Why was the West seemingly caught off balance by the lack of Indian, Brazilian, and South African support for Ukraine and how has the war accelerated other countries in the Global South to push for an alliance with BRICS? What role has Western trade sanctions played in the call for an alternative trade currency? With China now the biggest creditor in the world, replacing the World Bank as the financial lender, what does China hope to gain? Explore the relationship between these countries and their competing and complementary objectives, and examine the challenges facing the Western Alliance as other countries gain influence on the global stage.&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p><strong>Fall 2023 tuition is $450.</strong></p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 8002  An Election of Consequence: Campaign 2024  (0 Credits)  
<p>Scholars and analysts have described the 2024 US elections as the most consequential for the American future since the election of 1860. The course will focus on the most important issues and electoral factors at play during the most critical weeks of the election-the &quot;early voting&quot; period and Election Day-concluding with an analysis of the November 5 results and their potential implications for the US and for the world. It will consider in real-time the ongoing and emerging factors that will determine the outcome: the polarization and mood of the electorate; voter enthusiasm; third parties; the relative weight of competing issues, e.g., the future of democracy vs. the cost of cereal; the role of foreign policy (including Gaza and Ukraine); the Electoral College and the popular vote; and Trump&#39;s legal cases, among other issues. We&#39;ll monitor the parties&#39; electoral strategies and messaging in the presidential and congressional campaigns and look at potentially decisive voter blocs, including &quot;abortion voters&quot;; Black and Latino men; youth voters, and the disengaged and undecided. We&#39;ll examine the policy issues most in play and compare the parties&#39; national platforms. We&#39;ll consider &quot;targeting&quot; strategies and the roles of the Democratic left, the MAGA right, and the various pieces of the &quot;center.&quot; We&#39;ll look at the respective campaign &quot;narratives&quot; and monitor the role of media-how voter groups access and process information-and the tension between facts and feelings. We&#39;ll stay alert to potential &quot;October surprises&quot;; and assess the implications of potential total control of the three branches by either party versus split government. Following election day, we&#39;ll look to the future for the parties, for the political process, for governing, for the institutions of civil society and democracy, and for America&#39;s place in the world.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>Instructors:</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p><a href="https://www.sps.nyu.edu/professional-pathways/faculty/12468-judith-siegel.html">Judith Siegel</a>, Ph.D., former Deputy Assistant Secretary for International Information Programs at the U.S. State Department.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p><a href="https://www.sps.nyu.edu/professional-pathways/faculty/16320-mark-siegel.html">Mark Siegel</a>, Ph.D., former Executive Director of the Democratic National Committee and Deputy Assistant to the President.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 8003  Understanding Espionage and Intelligence  (2 Credits)  
Intelligence is perhaps the least understood function of the U.S. government. This course examines the role of the espionage and intelligence in U.S. national security and foreign policy. Over the course of twelve 1.5-hour sessions, &quot;Understanding Espionage and Intelligence&quot; will illuminate the history of intelligence operations and the formation of the U.S. intelligence community; how in intelligence is collected, analyzed, and provided to U.S. policymakers and how effective oversight reconciles intelligence with the rule of law in a democratic society. Additional sessions will focus on challenges in counterintelligence, the discipline of protecting U.S. national security from hostile foreign intelligence activities; and the intelligence operations of America&#39;s strategic rivals and adversaries.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9001  Examining Aspirations and Applications: Human Rights in US Foreign Policy  (0 Credits)  
This course will examine US national security issues through the prism of human rights, exploring how humanitarian concerns became woven into the fabric of traditional security studies and how this does or does not affect current policy. We will survey the most important literature and debates on the concepts of human rights and US national interest. We also will use case studies to explore the intersection of human rights, economic aims, strategic concerns, and peacebuilding. In addition, we will test the consistency of US guiding principles, the influence of nonstate actors on policy formation, and the strength of the international human rights regime. Ultimately, the course will challenge assumptions about how human rights first arose as a global phenomenon and assess the conflicted legacy of human rights in US foreign policy over the last several decades and in current policy.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9002  The Middle East: States, Rivalries, and Consequences  (0 Credits)  
The dynamics of the Middle East are replete with proxy wars, ethnic and religious conflicts, and political upheaval that has implications both in the region and in the international community. This course will survey geopolitical and conflict dynamics in nine countries and their relations to one another, including those involving Iran, Israel and the Palestinians, Iraq, Syria, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Egypt, and Jordan. Finally, we will discuss the Arab Peace Initiative and its relevance at this juncture in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The course will offer a unifying theme to these various topics and a deeper contextual understanding of current Middle Eastern affairs.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9003  Greenback, Redback, and the International Monetary Order  (0 Credits)  
This course will explore what many are arguing is the most profound crisis of our time&mdash;hegemonic stability. We will begin by defining the characteristics of a hegemon and discuss whether any country today can fit the role. If the United States no longer has the power to devise and enforce the broad rules of engagement, as suggested by a recent <em>Economist</em> article, then what are China&rsquo;s prospects? Applying classic international relations theory (realism, liberalism, and Marxism), we will examine the evolution of the post-WWII political and economic system and its state today, and we will evaluate the likelihood of power centers other than the United States emerging. Upon completion of the course, have greater familiarity with global governance issues and the strategic challenges facing the US today.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9004  An Introduction to Global Entrepreneurship and Ecosystems  (0 Credits)  
Whether in Buenos Aires or Beirut, Mombasa or Mumbai, people across continents are using entrepreneurship to solve the problems that have plagued them for so long and to revolutionize the systems that have denied them progress. They are doing what Silicon Valley did to corporate America&mdash;impelling the establishment to abandon outdated and hierarchical processes and to adopt more flexible and collaborative practices. Individuals in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East who have promising ideas are driving change. They are turning the start-up dream&mdash;once limited to Silicon Valley&mdash;into a universal one. Using case studies, examine how entrepreneurs across the global have overcome obstacles to create change. Explore emerging economic forces that are transforming societies just as completely as Steve Jobs and other Silicon Valley idols did just decades ago.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9005  The US Role in the World: The President, Congress, and the Global Reaction  (0 Credits)  
The course will consider visions of the US role in the world from a variety of official Washington perspectives, and the global reaction and response. We&rsquo;ll explore domestic and international views of the US foreign policy process and the role of presidential rhetoric. We also will assess the effects of the current US foreign policy process on the global security architecture. We will examine current and historical views of the US leadership role. Political strategist Mark Siegel will address emerging foreign affairs issues in the context of the 2018 congressional elections, with implications for control of the Congress and for the US political system in the longer term.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9006  Leadership and Governance in the Time of Pandemic: Autocrats and Democrats, Winners and Losers  (0 Credits)  
Leadership has played a critical role during the past year, in steering nations either to create strategies and policies that have saved lives and livelihoods or to sow divisiveness and fail to develop social trust thereby increasing contagion and economic crisis. The global pandemic has revealed effective leaders who brought their nations through the abyss of death and economic destruction and those leaders who were incompetent or who cynically utilized the crisis to consolidate power. The question is not the type of government, democracy or autocracy, but instead the ability of a leader to create good governance and successfully harness expertise and government institutions to coordinate stratagems to meet the challenges of the global pandemic. Why have women leaders done such a competent job at governance in the face of the pandemic? We will examine the winners and losers in Asia, Europe, Latin America, the United States, Canada, and Australasia and assess how global leaders have altered their nation&rsquo;s future and their own legacy for decades to come. So much has changed in a year! Through a case-study approach, we will discuss the varied success at effective governance by leaders from Latin America, Europe, the US, and Asia.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9007  Cybersecurity in Practice: Challenges and Opportunities  (2 Credits)  
What key emerging technologies are disrupting cybersecurity practices and day-to-day activities? How can public and private entities develop strategies, policies, and business solutions for managing cyber risk? Gain a foundational understanding of these and other emerging critical topics. Examine and analyze the techniques, strategies, and secrets of the world&rsquo;s top cybersecurity leaders. Explore how the use of cybersecurity prevention tools and the latest technologies can solve pressing cybersecurity and privacy challenges, both at national and global levels. <em>Technical expertise is not required to take this course.</em>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9008  Latin America: New Challenges and Shifting Relations  (0 Credits)  
<p><strong>Register for this Fall 2022 course on the new <a href="https://nyusps.gatherlearning.com/events/latin-america-new-challenges-and-shifting-relations">NYU SPS Academy of Lifelong Learning</a> website.</strong></p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>Latin America is stuck between stagnation and street protest; a region that struggles to realize its potential. For more than a century it has suffered governmental mismanagement, a lack of sustainable educational investment, environmental degradation, rampant corruption/crime, and rising political crises. The recent Covid pandemic has exacerbated existing educational and social issues with frequent school closures and local public health care crises. Moreover, the past 18 months has resulted in changing political landscapes across many Latin nations causing instability, fear, capital flight and a brain drain of tech, managerial, and professional classes. Recent elections in Peru, Ecuador, Honduras, Chile, and most recently Colombia, have created major shifts; new leaders overturning existing socioeconomic strategies with the goal of finding solutions to stagnation and entrenched problems. Why is the new Colombian President Gustavo Petro looking to nationalize industries and agriculture while also resetting relations with Venezuela? Is the fear of lasting capital flight and professional emigration a valid concern for Colombia? &nbsp;How will Mexico&rsquo;s new outreach to Venezuela, Russia and China affect relations with its largest trade partner as well as its critical membership in USMCA? &nbsp;With October elections in Brazil will Bolsonaro try to steal the October vote using the Trump playbook? What are the implications and ramifications for Chile of President Boric&rsquo;s new programs and the newly drafted constitution? Will rival influences between China and the US, the two top trading partners in the region, finally reach a strategic crisis? &nbsp;Is there a growing relationship between Iran and Argentina? What of the regional Russian arms trade? And most significantly will lithium, copper, oil and grain once again save Latin America?</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>Join in the analysis and assessment of these critical and evolving challenges now facing the Americas. Discuss potential regional competencies and opportunities at home and on the global stage.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p><strong>Fall 2022 tuition is $325.</strong></p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9009  Great Powers and Small Neighbors: The Cases of US-Cuba, USSR-Finland, and China-Vietnam Relations  (0 Credits)  
Very often, the study of global affairs focuses on the interplay between great powers. This course will explore international relations from a different paradigm. It examines asymmetric relations between countries&mdash;the systematic ways and structures in which the identities, alliances, policies, perceptions of vulnerability, and behaviors of both great and small powers are affected differently by disparities in power as well as in attention. The course will examine the validity of concepts such as Finlandization, revolutionary internationalism, appeasement, bandwagon mentality, and power balancing through three case studies from the Cold War period: US-Cuba, USSR-Finland, and China-Vietnam.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9010  The Trans-Pacific Partnership: Understanding the Policy Issues  (0 Credits)  
The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is trade and economic agreement among 12 countries on the Pacific Rim. The Obama Administration claims that the TPP will have significant economic benefits for the United States, and it represents the economic pillar of the Obama Administration&rsquo;s pivot to Asia. But the TPP has generated substantial political opposition, including from a majority of congressional Democrats, as well as conservative Republicans. This one-day course examines the critical policy issues in the TPP, including the effect on US employment, the use of international tribunals to hear complaints by multinational enterprises against governments, and enhanced protection of intellectual rights covering medications.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9011  Urbanization and Food Security  (0 Credits)  
What are the effects of urbanization on food security? What are the differences between rural and urban hunger? How do movements of people into cities and away from agricultural lifestyles affect food security, production, distribution, and consumption? Examine the nexus of urbanization and food security in cities and countries at varying levels of development, and explore innovative policy and programmatic solutions to urban food insecurity.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9012  Protecting Minority and Vulnerable Populations: Global Challenges and Responses  (0 Credits)  
Around the world, members of ethnic, racial, religious, linguistic, and indigenous minority groups and other vulnerable populations are subjected to discrimination, harassment, political exclusion, violence, and other forms of persecution. This course will cover a wide range of the current conditions facing multiple minority groups and other vulnerable populations worldwide, including in the United States. It also will consider emerging challenges that may lie ahead during a time of growing global xenophobia and political upheaval. The first part of the course will focus on domestic remedies that have been applied by states, including federalism, special political representation, civil rights protections, and policies of multiculturalism. The second part of the course will review actions taken within the international arena, including international human rights law, multilateral diplomacy, programs for refugee and displaced populations, and humanitarian intervention. This online course will consist of eight sessions, two of which will be live synchronous group discussions. It will draw on case studies of different types of minority and vulnerable populations in the Americas, Africa, Asia, and Europe, and it will employ insights from history, comparative politics, law, and international relations.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9013  Sustainable Development: The Case for a Living Wage  (0 Credits)  
&ldquo;Sustainability&rdquo; and &ldquo;living wages&rdquo; are buzzwords in international development. But what do they mean? How are they measured? How does progress around one concept affect progress toward the other? This class examines the contemporary sustainable-development and living-wage movements and interrogates their intersections. How are governments, international organizations, multinational corporations, and NGOs supporting these goals? Are those initiatives working? Or are they simply clever marketing and inefficient spending?
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9014  Country Risk: Geopolitics, Policy, and Regulation  (0 Credits)  
This course examines country risk&mdash;the risk that firms incur in cross-border investment. Country risk analysts and managers assess and mitigate the risk of financial loss to a firm due to country events, such as coups, social unrest, disease, and war, as well as economic shocks and policy changes. The recent COVID-19 outbreak (the novel coronavirus disease) has posed a unique challenge to governments across the globe, and in this course, we will discuss how different governments have handled this crisis and how it has impacted country risk. The course introduces students to country risk resources and the components of country risk analysis, including macroeconomic policy and performance, the balance of payments, public finances, and banking sector and political risks. The case study approach is employed, utilizing IMF Article IV Staff Reports and other resources as source material.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9015  LNG Fundamentals: Energy for a Cleaner Future  (0 Credits)  
Natural gas is touted as a reliable, flexible, and clean source of energy that represents an excellent alternative for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, helping to combat global warming, and complementing renewables. Thus, the global liquefied natural gas (LNG) market is experiencing double-digit growth annually&mdash;with progress witnessed in many exciting new ventures and developments worldwide. However, LNG project development is challenging: there are many risks and uncertainties, and the wrong decision or strategy could waste billions of dollars. Drawing on the deep expertise of Poten&rsquo;s LNG advisory practice and NYU faculty, this course provides a robust overview of the LNG value chain, from upstream development, liquefaction, shipping, and regasification through to downstream market delivery. It also covers the contractual elements of LNG project development and provides an overview of the wider business environment, including project economics, commercial and regulatory issues, geopolitical risk, and risk management. This program is offered in collaboration with Poten &amp; Partners. <strong><a href="http://www.poten.com/lng-101-energy-cleaner-future-homepage" target="_blank">Register today</a>.</strong>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9016  Communication Strategies for Successful Crisis Management, Negotiation, and Conflict Resolution  (2 Credits)  
Crises, conflicts, and disputes arise throughout our careers on varying scales, no matter our profession. How we respond and communicate during them helps to shape their resolution. This course will provide a communication framework used by crisis intervention experts that can be applied to a variety of personal and professional situations. The interactive class will incorporate case studies, role-plays, lectures, and group participation. By the completion of the course, you will have a deeper understanding of the impact that communication has during conflict and crisis situations and knowledge of how to utilize these skills effectively.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9017  Foreign Policy in the 2016 US Election  (0 Credits)  
The foreign policy debate in the 2016 US presidential election provides dramatic contrasts in policy, vision, style, and the face that the United States presents to the world. In this course, examine candidate and party positions in the unfolding election on the US global role in policy, historical, rhetorical, demographic, and electoral contexts. Track global public perceptions and analyze historical case studies to understand the significance of foreign policy in election debates and outcomes. Sessions featuring political scientist and practitioner Mark Siegel will examine how campaigns track and shape public opinion, as well as the implications of the composition and ideology of the 2016 electorate.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9018  The Raging Conflicts of the Middle East  (2 Credits)  
The raging conflicts of the Middle East are characterized by proxy wars, ethnic and religious conflicts, and political upheaval with major regional and international implications. This course will survey the geopolitics and the dynamics of eight different conflicts and examine how they relate to one another. Among the conflicts and the countries to be covered are Iran, Israel and the Palestinians, Iraq, Syria, Turkey, Yemen, the struggle for Kurdish independence, and the Sunni-Shia conflict. The course will offer a unifying theme to these various topics and a deeper contextual understanding of current Middle Eastern affairs.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9019  Latin America and Asia: Power, Oil, Religion, and Culture  (2 Credits)  
Asia&rsquo;s expanding influence in Latin America has become one of the most salient changes of the 21st century. How has the Asian influence in development, trade, and culture affected Latin America? How has it shaped particular foreign policies of individual countries? China, a source of cheap manufactured imports and a major export destination for oil, chemicals, rare minerals, and other valuable commodities, has displaced the United States as chief trading partner for many Latin American countries. Although Asia&rsquo;s growth has declined in the past few years, there still is an insatiable desire for commodities and other raw materials needed to fulfill Asian production needs. The relationship between Asia and Latin America is not uniform across the region, however. Asia also has been a fierce competitor in lower-level manufacturing and textiles, which has forced Mexico and Central American countries to evolve, moving up the supply chain with more complex and sophisticated product sets and promoting Latin American exports in technology-based manufacturing. Has development been well managed by Latin American countries, or have they mortgaged future earnings for unequal relationships, contracting future development funds to foreign governments? Have Trump&rsquo;s foreign policy and attitude toward Latino populations created new, stronger bonds between Asia and Latin America and drawn the regions and peoples closer together? This course will examine Asia&rsquo;s impact on Latin America, focusing on trade but also assessing historical, cultural, religious, societal, and strategic factors.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9020  Program Design for Monitoring and Evaluation  (3 Credits)  
<p>This course will build on your ability to develop a theoretical framework of monitoring and evaluation. In this portion of the program, you will start operationalizing the theoretical framework into a measurable one. You will learn how to move from constructs to variables, how to build reliable and valid measures, and which qualitative and quantitative methodologies and designs are available to you. The course also will include discussion of case studies from various sectors/industries.&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p><strong>Please note</strong> that <a href="https://www.sps.nyu.edu/professional-pathways/courses/GLOB1-CE9032-introduction-to-monitoring-and-evaluation.html" target="_blank"><em>Introduction to Monitoring and Evaluation</em></a> is a prerequisite for this course.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>COURSE TOPICS:</p><br><br><br><br><ul><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Problem Definition and Targeting</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Applying the Theory of Change</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Evaluative Questions and Evaluation Capacity Planning</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Logic Models &amp; Framework</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Indicator Design</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Process Evaluation</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Outcome &amp; Impact Evaluation</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Data Collection Systems</li><br><br></ul><br><br><br><br><p><br /><br><br><i>This is an instructor-led virtual course which includes both synchronous-live sessions and asynchronous weekly modules. Students are required to attend at least 80% of the synchronous sessions in order to successfully complete the course.</i></p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9021  Electric Utilities 101  (1 Credit)  
Gain a foundational understanding of the market structure, technology, and economics of electric utilities. The primary focus will be on the US markets, but the information is largely applicable to other markets as well. Industry experts will provide their insights on trends in technology and regulatory policy with practical application for end-customer understanding. The course will give an overview of the industry, electric supply chain, market structure and stakeholder roles, basic economics of the monopoly and competitive entities, and technological and regulatory trends. Students will hear from utility professionals, review case studies, and participate in a short module about how to develop a &ldquo;go-to-market strategy&rdquo; for utility engagement.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9022  The Global Financial System: Understanding Data and News  (1 Credit)  
The global financial system can be difficult to decipher. It is, however, key to any wider understanding of our globalized world. As such, this course provides the conceptual toolkit required both to understand, and to interpret independently, the global financial system. It offers methods for discussing and deciphering economic data and economic indicators and for navigating the financial press. Topics include a general overview of the global financial system; its interaction with the international economy; and the interaction of both with governments, economic policy, and regulation. Learn about the nature of different financial markets, institutions, regulation, and the role and impact of central banks. Gain clarity on the key issues currently facing economists and financial markets, as well as the geopolitical aspects of these issues.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9023  Superstorm Sandy, New York City, and Climate Change  (0 Credits)  
Tornadoes, October blizzards, and hurricanes hit New York City for two consecutive years. If you are wondering what is going on&#8211;&#8211;and what lies ahead&#8211;&#8211;learn more about climate change, catastrophic weather events, and their impact on the metropolitan New York area. Discover what we know about the connection between climate and weather, what makes New York City particularly vulnerable, what can be done to increase New York&#8217;s resilience in the face of future events, and what we can expect moving forward. Take part in a short, simulated scenario exercise of a potential future event, which complements lectures and discussions.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9024  Qualitative Methods in Evaluation  (3 Credits)  
<p>In this course, you will continue to explore approaches to data collection and analysis. The qualitative methods sessions cover qualitative research methods; mining others&rsquo; research to prepare literature reviews; and developing data gathering tools such as surveys, interviews, focus groups, and observations. You will use case studies and other qualitative result reports to develop your critical analysis of the validity and reliability of evidence and findings.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>COURSE TOPICS:</p><br><br><br><br><ul><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Introduction to Qualitative Research</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Research questions and components of a research proposal</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Introduction to main QR methods and discussion of interviewing, focus groups, and participant observation.</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Biographical Sketch discussions</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Participant observation: concepts, sample, develop PO protocol.</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Case study observation</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Data analysis</li><br><br></ul><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p><em>This is an instructor-led virtual course with weekly asynchronous modules. Each synchronous class day will cover a specific topic, thus morning and evening sessions have the same content so students have the choice to attend either session. Students are required to attend at least three of the seven live synchronous sessions.</em></p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9025  The Politics of Money  (0 Credits)  
The global financial crisis is by far the most important happening since 9/11, with ramifications for every country. Explore the crisis from the perspective of global capital flows, which act as the circulatory system of the international political economy. Global capital flows outstrip trade flows in goods and services by a large margin. This new phenomenon is reflected in the increasingly important role that rules on investment play in current trade agreements, such as the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Global capital flows are essential to understanding the contours of the modern order and the ways that countries project power. Explore a wide range of issues, including development, governance, geopolitics, and integration and disintegration through the prism of the global capital markets.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9026  Understanding Capital Markets: Theory and Practice  (0 Credits)  
What are the necessary skills needed to think like a global investor? Learn how to interpret key economic indicators and understand the structure, risks, and rewards of the equity, fixed income, currency, and commodities markets. Building upon class lectures, complete a series of assignments that help you to develop a framework for creating a top-down investment proposal. Analyze how a given macroeconomic forecast can create opportunities and risks across different asset classes and industry sectors before extending the proposal to a specific, investable exchange-traded fund, stock, bond, commodity, or currency.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9027  The United States Policy in the Middle East  (2 Credits)  
This course will address United States foreign policy in the Middle East, focusing on both US adversaries and allies alike. The course will elaborate on the US strategic interest in the Gulf states and the impact of US conflict with Iran on American policy in the region. The course will detail the US efforts to mediate an Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement, the stabilization of Iraq, prospects for an end to the war in Yemen, the search for a permanent solution to the Syrian civil war, and the nature of US bilateral relations with Jordan and Egypt. Finally, we will discuss the soundness of US policy and the extent to which the massive American military presence remains indispensable to the region&rsquo;s security.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9028  International Trade Policy: The Front Line of Globalization  (0 Credits)  
International trade policy lies at the core of contemporary debates about global affairs and the world economy. Headline trade issues range form broad policy questions of economic development, labor standards, and U.S./China relations to disputes over cotton subsidies, genetically modified foods, and internet gambling. Gain a comprehensive understanding of the broad questions and arcane issues of trade policy and how they play out in a global trading system comprised of domestic politics, international negotiations and disputes in the World Trade Organization, and regional and bilateral free-trade agreements.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9029  Reporting and Presenting Results  (3 Credits)  
<p>This course combines what was learned during the previous four courses in the Certificate program and adds pieces and ideas not yet covered. The primary work product will be to use the evaluation proposal and framework developed during Program Design for Monitoring and Evaluation, add data analysis of the program or project using the methods learned during the Analytical Skills and Application for Monitoring and Evaluation course, and prepare a final M&amp;E findings report for a specific target audience. Students will also present their findings to the class during the final session.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>COURSE TOPICS:&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><ul><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Intro to Evaluation Reports</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Intro to Data Visualization</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Real-time visualizations (Dashboards, online reporting tools, innovations in Evaluation reporting)</li><br><br></ul><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p><em>This is an instructor-led virtual course which includes both synchronous-live sessions and asynchronous weekly modules. Students are required to attend at least 80% of the synchronous sessions in order to successfully complete the course.</em></p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9030  Introduction to Critical Infrastructure: All-Hazards Approach  (4 Credits)  
Energy and water, communications and transportation, and everything in between&mdash;these are the essential elements of any developed society. Few things have a greater impact on the delivery of goods and services than an interruption to any one of these sectors. The protection and resilience of these critical services are vital to the preparedness and post-disaster activities of governments, emergency responders, and the private sector. This course analyzes the critical issues associated with infrastructure protection and risk-reduction activities. It provides a framework for identifying and organizing critical infrastructure and explores the legislative and regulatory authorities for critical infrastructure protection and resilience. The course leverages extensive case studies in order to highlight security and resilience challenges, best practices, and lessons learned from a range of all-hazards threats. It provides the foundation needed to leverage federal, state, and local partnerships and resources in support of risk reduction&mdash;all aimed at driving business continuity and preparedness planning.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9031  The Foreign Policy Dynamic: The New Congress, the President, and the 2020 Election  (1 Credit)  
The incoming 116th Congress suggests a new dynamic for US foreign policy, including increased congressional activism and oversight in response both to administration policies and to developments on the world stage. This course will address the historical and contemporary roles of Congress in foreign policy, the specific and sui generis political challenges of the Trump era, global opinion, and the implications for the US leadership role in the world and for the 2020 presidential race. Using real-time foreign affairs developments as case studies, we will evaluate the dynamic in terms of US policy, the global security landscape, and the 2020 presidential election. Political scientist Mark Siegel will be responsible for course elements on US Congress.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9032  Introduction to Monitoring and Evaluation  (4 Credits)  
<p>This course will introduce the fundamentals of monitoring and evaluation (M&amp;E). It will address questions such as: What is monitoring and evaluation? Why do it? Who does it? By the end of this course, you will be able to develop a monitoring and evaluation theoretical framework.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>COURSE TOPICS:</p><br><br><br><br><ul><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Evaluation Basics</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Life Cycles and Frameworks</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Monitoring</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Evaluation Approaches</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Ethics in Evaluation</li><br><br></ul><br><br><br><br><p>This is an instructor led virtual course with weekly asynchronous modules. Students are required to attend at least two of the synchronous live sessions.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9033  Examining the World Through International Relations  (1 Credit)  
Explore the foundational theories and history of international relations, and analyze the key dimensions of competing ideologies, threats, and challenges. Examine the various actors including state and non-state actors, institutions, and individuals through the lens of issues such as nuclear proliferation, climate change, global conflicts, human rights, immigration, and global pandemics. Discuss political and economic integration, and evaluate how cooperation on international security is impacted by issues of sovereignty and intervention.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9034  Critical Infrastructure: Vulnerability and Consequence Analysis  (4 Credits)  
Comprehensive risk reduction for critical infrastructure requires an understanding of asset protection and resilience enhancement methodologies. These activities are vital components of sound preparedness and business continuity planning across all levels of government and industry. This course will establish a foundation for engaging in risk management by focusing on vulnerability and consequence analysis. Develop an understanding of infrastructure restoration prioritization, dependency mapping, and infrastructure preparedness activities in support of resilience. Gain an introduction to physical security assessments for infrastructure and an enhanced understanding of available cybersecurity resources. Also, acquire the skills necessary to develop resilience and security enhancement options, and discuss techniques to brief those results to industry leaders and emergency managers.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9035  Quantitative Methods in Evaluation  (3 Credits)  
<p>This course introduces approaches to data collection and analysis. In the quantitative methods sessions, examine quantitative research designs and their applications in evaluation, explore sampling methods, and learn to develop quantitative measurement tools. Design simple surveys, and become familiar with varied types of quantitative instruments. Also, analyze quantitative studies to understand implications of findings for effectiveness and sustainability, as well as secondary data sets to understand the basics of statistical relationships and modeling.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>COURSE TOPICS:&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><ul><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Introduction: Getting quantitative research designs right</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Gathering your own data: Beginning survey design</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Basic descriptive statistics: Mean, median, mode, minimum, maximum, range, and visualization</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Advanced descriptive statistics: Interquartile range and standard deviation</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Correlation + introduction to inferential statistics</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Inferential statistics: Introduction to RStudio and t-tests</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Inferential statistics continued: Chi square and ANOVA</li><br><br></ul><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p><em>This is an instructor-led virtual course with weekly asynchronous modules. Students are required to attend at least three of the seven synchronous live sessions.</em></p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9036  Infrastructure Incident and Consequence Management  (4 Credits)  
The complex nature of responding to disasters, both man-made and natural, requires a level of integration and preparedness that can be challenging to attain. An organization&rsquo;s survival depends largely on its ability to properly leverage previous preparedness initiatives, in combination with existing local and regional hazard adaptation efforts. This course will explore the various organizational structures that best support incident decision-making and the role of critical infrastructure consequence management. It will rely heavily on case studies of previous hazard adaptation efforts and draw upon best practices for future mitigation strategies. Develop infrastructure products and analysis to support decision-making authorities, such as emergency managers and corporate leaders. Also, gain an understanding of the Incident Command System (ICS) by evaluating industry standards and best practices. Be further challenged to develop preliminary standard operating procedure for incorporating critical infrastructure protection and resilience activities into corporate or government incident command.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9037  The History of Human Rights in US Foreign Policy  (1 Credit)  
This course examines US foreign policy through the prism of human rights, exploring how humanitarian concerns became woven into the fabric of traditional security studies and how this does or does not affect current policy. We survey the most important literature and debates concerning the concepts of human rights and the US national interest. We also use case studies to explore the intersection of human rights, economic aims, strategic concerns, and peacebuilding. In addition, we will test the consistency of US guiding principles, the influence of nonstate actors on policy formation, and the strength of the international human rights regime. Ultimately, the course will challenge assumptions about how human rights first arose as a global phenomenon and assess the conflicted legacy of human rights in US foreign policy over the last several decades and in current policy.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9039  Background and History of Organized Crime  (0.5 Credits)  
<p><strong>Register for this Summer&nbsp;2023 course on the <a href="https://nyusps.gatherlearning.com/events/background-and-history-of-organized-crime---summer-2023">NYU SPS Academy of Lifelong Learning</a> website.</strong></p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>This course will look at the organization and structure of mafia groups using several case studies. Students will use conceptual frameworks and historical background to analyze these organizations&rsquo; symbols, activities, rituals, and businesses, in both legal and illegal markets. This course will also look at a list of set policies implemented to control organized crime, and prevent further infiltration into society, and consider the activities of criminal organizations relative to those of legitimate organizations.</p><br><br><br><br><p><em>Note: Some topics in this class cover a few violent themes pertaining to the history, formation, and business of select organized crime groups.</em></p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>Summer 2023 tuition is $325.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9040  America Through Foreign Eyes  (1 Credit)  
Drawing upon his recently published book of the same name, Jorge Casta&ntilde;eda, former foreign minister of Mexico, will use his experience as a foreign diplomat working in and with the United States to examine issues such American exceptionalism, uniformity, race and religion, culture, immigration, and the death penalty. Through the lens of comparative politics and culture, Casta&ntilde;eda will explore with students how the relationship between nationalism and nostalgia has impacted American politics in similar ways to those of other countries and how those experiences can inform the current situation in this country.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9041  A Path Forward: Energy, Environment, Sustainability, and Climate Change  (1 Credit)  
<p>The environmental impacts of energy production, industrial activity, and transportation have become a fundamental concern of governments, NGOs, and the general public over the past 50 years. Damage to public health and the environment comes in a number of ways, including from climate change, acid rain, urban smog, and hazardous wastes, among others. These impact not only human health but also the fundamental natural systems upon which all life depends. Examine the sources of energy, the methods of transforming energy into useful products such as electricity, and the impacts of the extraction and use of energy. We will look at the history of modern energy technologies and systems, as well as the economics. We also will look at the history and evolving shape of the modern environmental movement, in the US and globally, as well as the laws, regulations, and international regimes that govern how we address environmental and public health concerns. What has been the influence of special interests and how has this affected the progress of the laws? How has the private sector fought against environmental protection and also, increasingly in the past few years, served to advance sustainability?</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9042  An Introduction to the Culture and Structure of the Islamic World  (1 Credit)  
<p><strong>Register for this Spring 2023 course on the new <a href="https://nyusps.gatherlearning.com/events/an-introduction-to-the-culture-and-structure-of-the-islamic-world---spring-2023">NYU SPS Academy of Lifelong Learning</a> website.</strong></p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>Islam appeared on the world stage some 1,400 years ago and, in less than a century, expanded its reach from Spain to the borders of China. This spectacular geographic growth was accompanied by the internal development of religious, legal, and political codes that allowed it to rule over such a diverse population. Islam, while maintaining its original integrity, modified itself over time to serve the needs and requirements of the peoples of its realms. This short, compact introduction to the Islamic world will not delve into the details of its beliefs, but rather look at its cultural diversity, touch on its history, and give an overview of Islam today by comparing its main schools and their philosophies.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p><strong>Spring 2023&nbsp;tuition is $325.</strong></p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9043  The US Presidency: The First 100 Days of the Biden-Harris Administration  (1 Credit)  
<p>IF THE COURSE HAS REACHED CAPACITY AND YOU ARE UNABLE TO ENROLL, PLEASE REACH OUT TO <a href="mailto:KACI.FOREST@NYU.EDU"><strong>KACI.FOREST@NYU.EDU</strong></a> TO GET A SPOT.<br /><br><br><br /><br><br>This course will address the unfolding policy, political, legislative, public opinion, and messaging dimensions of the incoming Biden-Harris administration, with special reference to global affairs. We&rsquo;ll look at the transition from campaigning to governing: setting the domestic and foreign policy strategic agendas, identifying priorities, communicating domestically and globally, weighing executive actions, forging congressional relations, initiating legislation, and mobilizing public support. The course will track developments in real time, using class readings, media, and expert guest speakers.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9044  Leadership in a Cyber-Dependent World  (1 Credit)  
<p>Effective leadership is an overlooked yet essential component of building and maintaining a cybersecurity posture. Today&#39;s business operations depend on cyber more than ever and solid leadership has always been essential to profitable business operations. Therefore it is more imperative than ever for leaders to understand their organization&#39;s technological dependencies and be able to lead across technical and non-technical communities. Effective 21st century leaders are required to understand how data breaches, hacking, ransomware, and evolving digital privacy laws impact day-to-day operations and revenue to enable the development and implementation of cross-cutting strategies.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>Cyber security strategies need to be collaboratively developed and communicated across functional areas within organizations. Successful leaders in today&rsquo;s connected world are able to coordinate, communicate and lead across technical and non-technical teams to raise awareness, train, and educate all employees about cyber vulnerabilities, threats, and risk mitigation to ensure that business operations continue despite the onslaught of malicious activity from cyber actors.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>In a highly competitive market for cybersecurity and technical talent, it is critical for organizations to ensure that they are recruiting and retaining the best candidates who are then guided by proactive and effective leadership that can align their teams to organizational priorities. Ineffective leadership can create dysfunction within a team and result in the next headline-making breach or business disruption permanently damaging an organization&#39;s reputation and negatively impacting revenue.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>This program is designed to help organizations cultivate leaders that can effectively lead technical and non-technical teams, and foster cross-vertical relationships among technical and non-technical leaders. Participants will hone and develop their leadership &ldquo;soft skills,&rdquo; and re-examine the fundamentals of leadership practices and reorient them to application in the digital sphere. Participants will explore the digital dependencies of their organizations and become empowered to navigate emerging risks associated with their technologically empowered working environments, associates, and consumers.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>Those who successfully complete this program will earn the <strong>Certificate in Cyber Leadership</strong>.</p><br><br><br><br><p><strong><a href="https://www.sps.nyu.edu/homepage/academics/executive-education/executive-education-certificates/foundations-of-cyber-leadership.html">LEARN MORE AND REGISTER</a></strong></p><br><br><br><br><p><em>**Discounts are available for NYU Alumni, US Government employees (city/state/federal), and US Veterans. Learn more via the link above**</em></p><br><br><br><br><p><strong>Course Topics will include:</strong></p><br><br><br><br><ul><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Cyber Complexity and Organizational Dependencies (IT/OT/IOT/PIT)</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Security vs. Compliance</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Basic Leadership Principles</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Standards, Regulations and Risk Management Frameworks (CIS, RMF, CMM)</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Leading Change</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Business Continuity/Mission Assurance</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Crisis Leadership, Plan/Brief/Execute/Debrief/Wrap-up</li><br><br></ul><br><br><br><br><p>Note: Those who will benefit most from this program will have some professional experience managing small teams, and will be interested in gaining the cyber knowledge and leadership skills to advance in their careers.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9045  Shifting Global and Domestic Paradigms and the 2022 Midterms  (1 Credit)  
<p><strong>Register for this Fall 2022 course on the new <a href="https://nyusps.gatherlearning.com/events/shifting-global-and-domestic-paradigms-and-the-2022-midterms">NYU SPS Academy of Lifelong Learning</a> website.</strong></p><br><br><br><br><p>Significant global and domestic developments&mdash;Russia&rsquo;s invasion of Ukraine, the economy, the Supreme Court, and cultural issues&mdash;are playing out in the context of the 2022 US midterm elections that will determine control of the Senate and House and the course of the next two years of American politics. We&rsquo;ll look at new potential paradigms in the global and US political order. We&rsquo;ll analyze global issues including the war in Ukraine, considering the position of the US as world leader, the role of alliances, challenges to traditional diplomacy, norms and the rule of law, nuclear threats, autocracy vs. democracy, the information landscape, the ambivalence of the developing world, and implications for future global conflicts. We&rsquo;ll examine the role of the Biden administration in Ukraine and broader foreign policy in the midterms, and we&rsquo;ll look at domestic issues, including inflation, the culture wars, and voting and civil rights as they play out in the campaign. We&rsquo;ll explore the roots and consequences of polarization in US politics, and finally, we&rsquo;ll assess the implications of the current global and domestic scene for the 2024 election and beyond.</p><br><br><br><br><p><strong>Fall 2022 tuition is $425.</strong></p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9071  US-EU Relations: Brexit, Trump, the UK Election, European Integration, and the Transatlantic Allianc  (1 Credit)  
Major geopolitical changes are taking place within Europe&mdash;and between the United States and Europe. Brexit marks the biggest geopolitical shift in Europe since the fall of the Berlin Wall. After 50 years of growing European integration&mdash;championed by successive US administrations&mdash;the UK&rsquo;s upcoming exit from the EU is the first time any country has left the union. At the same time, European-US relations have become more strained under the Trump administration, as US foreign policy has become more nationalistic, transactional, and mercantile. Trump has broken with previous US presidents by seeing the EU as a competitor to the United States rather than a strategic Western ally. This course will focus on the foreign policy and geopolitical aspects of Brexit, Trump, European integration, and the transatlantic alliance. It will provide an understanding of the history and reasons for European integration and for the development of a close, strategic European-US relationship&mdash;from 1919 to 2019. It then will look at current challenges to EU integration and to European-US relations, particularly from Brexit and the Trump administration, including the impact the UK election this December will have on Brexit&rsquo;s next steps. This course also will examine why the UK voted to leave the EU, how US foreign policy in general&mdash;and toward Europe in particular&mdash;has shifted under Trump from the approach taken by previous Republican and Democratic presidents, and how UK foreign policy will adapt to being outside the union.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9072  Critical Issues and Careers in Global Affairs  (0 Credits)  
<p><b>Apply for this Summer 2023 course&nbsp;<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?q=https://www.sps.nyu.edu/homepage/academics/divisions-and-departments/center-for-global-affairs/summer-at-cga-critical-issues-and-careers-in-global-affairs.html&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1678375867660000&amp;usg=AOvVaw1PfeRMcvh45yvaSOkegTg3" href="https://www.sps.nyu.edu/homepage/academics/divisions-and-departments/center-for-global-affairs/summer-at-cga-critical-issues-and-careers-in-global-affairs.html" target="_blank">here</a>.</b></p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>Thinking about grad school? Considering an impactful career in the global arena? Spend two weeks this summer in the heart of New York City studying with expert faculty from the NYU SPS Center for Global Affairs.<br /><br><br><br /><br><br>Today&rsquo;s global issues&ndash;&ndash;from terrorism and climate change to human rights, cyber security, and the global economy&ndash;&ndash;have both subtle and significant impacts on our lives. Through sessions led by NYU faculty scholars and practitioners, participants will immerse themselves in examining and exploring today&rsquo;s critical global issues.<br /><br><br><br /><br><br>In addition to deep dives on critical topics, the program features dynamic guest lectures and site visits to expose participants to the variety of career paths for an impactful global career, expand their professional network, and better understand the desired skill sets and content areas that organizations are seeking.<br /><br><br><br /><br><br>Topics include:</p><br><br><br><br><ul><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>International Relations: Theories and Geopolitics</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>International Political Economy: The Building Blocks</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Geopolitics of Energy and Climate Change</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Transnational Security: Threats, Actors, and Practice</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>International Development: Poverty, Inequity, and Economic Growth</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>International Organizations: the UN, IMF, World Bank</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Cyberspace: Technical, Operational, and Strategic Perspectives</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Global Risk: Uncertainty and Operationalization</li><br><br></ul><br><br><br><br><p><em>Site visits may include: The United Nations and its affiliated agencies, permanent missions to the UN, NGOs, and global private sector firms.</em></p><br><br><br><br><p><br /><br><br><strong>Summer Housing Option:</strong> There are a limited number of double-room occupancy dorm options available for this program. Check-in will be Sunday, July 9th and check-out Saturday, July 22rd. The rate is $77/person/night. Please contact mcd231@nyu.edu for more information.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p><b>Summer 2023 tuition is $3,495.</b></p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p><strong>Early Registration deadline:</strong> April 26th</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p><b>Apply for this Summer 2023 course&nbsp;<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?q=https://www.sps.nyu.edu/homepage/academics/divisions-and-departments/center-for-global-affairs/summer-at-cga-critical-issues-and-careers-in-global-affairs.html&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1678375867660000&amp;usg=AOvVaw1PfeRMcvh45yvaSOkegTg3" href="https://www.sps.nyu.edu/homepage/academics/divisions-and-departments/center-for-global-affairs/summer-at-cga-critical-issues-and-careers-in-global-affairs.html" target="_blank">here</a>.</b></p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p><strong><em>Note about COVID-related protocols</em></strong><em><strong>: </strong></em>Students attending onsite cour
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9073  The US-Latin America Relationship: Past, Present, and Future  (0 Credits)  
<div>The United States&rsquo; relationship with Latin America has been and continues to be one of the most important and controversial relationships of the modern era. In the two centuries since the tide of independence swept across most of the Americas, Latin American nations and the US have cooperated, competed, and struggled. As the United States has grown into a global power over this period, its neighbors to the south have offered various responses. This course explores both sides of the US-Latin American relationship, tracing its development over time and analyzing its current challenges. Throughout the course, students will integrate US and Latin American perspectives, drawing on both primary and secondary sources. We will explore questions including: What interests and objectives shape US policy towards Latin America? What interests and objectives have shaped Latin American states&rsquo; policies towards the US? How have non-governmental actors in both the US and Latin America influenced international relations across the Western Hemisphere? We explore issues including diplomacy, travel and tourism, images and stereotypes, military intervention, economics, cultural exchange, and migration.</div><br><br><br><br><div>&nbsp;</div><br><br><br><br><div>&nbsp;</div><br><br><br><br><div>Discounts are available for NYU Alumni and our older adult learners. Please call 212-998-7150 to learn more and determine your eligibility.</div>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9080  Brand America: Introduction to U.S. Public Diplomacy  (0 Credits)  
The U.S. government conducts a broad and sophisticated program of global outreach and public diplomacy to tell America&rsquo;s story. Exchange programs, public affairs, traditional and social media, and broadcasting programs aim to increase the U.S. strategic advantage by informing and influencing foreign publics. Examine public diplomacy case studies from the early days of the republic to the present, to see how the U.S. has tried to generate global support. Use public diplomacy tools in a series of practical exercises to develop media plans, talking points, information and briefing memos, op-eds, and other products that apply to public and private sector information, marketing, and advocacy campaigns.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9081  Foreign Policy in the Time of the Internet  (0 Credits)  
Foreign policy is among the things that the Internet has revolutionized. No longer is diplomacy confined to oak-paneled rooms and gilded corridors. This change, as <em>New York Times</em> reporter Mark Landler noted, &ldquo;happened so fast that it left the foreign policy establishment gasping to catch up.&rdquo; This course examines how foreign policy and international affairs are being shaped in the age of the Internet. Topics include democracy versus censorship, conflict, climate change and the environment, big data and privacy, and economics and the movement of capital.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9083  Publishing Op-Eds and Blogposts  (2 Credits)  
<p>A great way to become recognized in your field is to publish op-eds, blogposts, and other short articles on your topics of expertise and interest. This highly interactive, and career-building, course will guide you through the process of developing a topic, writing and revising through two drafts, identifying potential publication venues, and navigating the submission process. Students will be asked to begin the class with a topic of focus identified and then will aim to have a short article ready for potential publication by the end of the six weeks. The assignment can be used to help you begin establishing yourself as a thought leader or simply enable you to pursue a passion project or enhance your writing in general. This course is designed primarily for those who have not already published extensively in these formats, although those with prior experience are also welcome.&nbsp; The instructor has published numerous op-eds, blogposts, and other articles in publications including&nbsp;<em>The Washington Post, The Daily Beast, Huffington Post, Politico, Washington Monthly</em>&nbsp;, and&nbsp;<em>The New York Times</em>&nbsp;, and has taught writing skills at NYU, Columbia, and the University of Arizona.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p><strong>COURSE TOPICS</strong></p><br><br><br><br><ul><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Creating an op-ed or blogpost outline</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Researching potential publication venues</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Producing a publishable-quality article</li><br><br></ul>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9084  US Foreign Policy and Afghanistan: From 9/11 to the Present and Beyond  (0 Credits)  
Consider US foreign policymaking toward Afghanistan from September 11, 2001, to the present in the security, political, and economic realms. Survey prospects for maintaining peace and security in the country going forward. Understand how Afghanistan&rsquo;s neighbors, such as Pakistan, India, Iran, China, and Russia, view the situation. Explore key factors affecting the fate of Afghanistan&rsquo;s future, and examine the regional geopolitical challenges facing policymakers and scholars today.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9085  Understanding the United States Intelligence Community  (0 Credits)  
For more than 70 years, the United States Intelligence Community (USIC) has evolved to meet the global issues of the day. Solidified after World War II, refined during the Cold War, and called upon after the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, the USIC exists to serve a broad set of stakeholders in an often dynamic and ever-changing global environment. This course reviews the history of the USIC from World War II to the Gulf Wars and the fight against global terrorism. It provides an introduction to the legislative and executive framework that has guided the USIC during these periods of global conflict, a review of each agency&rsquo;s role, and a survey of its documented successes and failures. What does the global sociopolitical environment have in store for the USIC, and what changes might be needed to ensure that it is prepared?
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9086  The Political Economy of Inequality: Global and Local Perspectives  (0 Credits)  
When a society&rsquo;s economy creates wealth, how is it divided and who decides? The problem of wealth distribution has challenged economic thinkers and has defined political action for centuries. Recently, the Occupy Wall Street movement and books such as <em>Capital in the 21st Century</em> by Thomas Piketty have highlighted growing trends in inequality across the globalized economy. This course explores the internal and external drivers of inequality and their impact on a society&rsquo;s productivity and stability. It also examines approaches to address debilitating income gaps with a comparative survey of the different inequality policies used in both mature and emerging countries.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9088  Political Combustion in the Arab World  (0 Credits)  
<p>What are the underlining factors and who are the current players in today&rsquo;s persisting tensions in the Middle East? Most important, how might these conflicts be resolved? Explore these questions while examining the critical issues and recurring themes in the region, including the burgeoning conflict between Sunni Saudi Arabia and Shiite Iran, the rise of religious extremism, and the culture of authoritarianism. Analyze the U.S. Government&rsquo;s Mideast policy, with a special focus on its efforts to find a resolution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. What are the options? What effect does the ongoing struggle have on other conflicts in the region? Are there any realistic avenues to a solution?</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9090  The United Nations: What It Is and What It Does  (0 Credits)  
Gain a better understanding of the U.N. system by examining the vision of the U.N. Charter and the current functioning of some of its main organs: the General Assembly, the Security Council, and the Economic and Social Council. Explore reforms and changes needed to enable an organization established in 1945 to respond more effectively to the geopolitical realities of the 21st century, as well as such critical challenges as peacekeeping, humanitarian assistance, and human rights.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9091  China: The Emergence of a Global Economic Power  (0 Credits)  
Explore China&#8217;s emergence as a global economic, financial, political, and military power. China&#8217;s historically unprecedented economic development over the past three decades will be a major focus. Discuss the Chinese economic model (the Beijing consensus) in a comparative perspective and assess its future viability. Understand the impact China&#8217;s emergence has had, and will have, on the existing global economic-financial order. Last but not least, examine how China&#8217;s emergence as a global power has been affecting Beijing&#8217;s relations with Washington, D.C. and its Asian neighbors.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9092  Europe's Global Future in the Digital Age  (0 Credits)  
Explore the origins and various causes of financial turmoil in the Eurozone and its implications for the future of the European Union, as well as Europe's relations with the United States, Russia, and rising powers such as India, China, and Brazil. Transnational immigration, the impact of the neo-liberal model on the welfare state, and the information technology revolution call into question postwar conceptions of integration in Europe. These challenges are assessed and evaluated as we consider the continent's global relevance in our 21st-century world.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9093  China's Emergence as a Global Power  (0 Credits)  
This course will explore China&rsquo;s emergence as a global economic, financial, political, and military power. We will discuss the Chinese economic model in a historical and comparative perspective. We then will turn toward the challenges the Chinese economy is currently facing, and we will be analyzing the most recent reform proposals and their likely chance of success. The second part of the course will focus on the global political implications of China&rsquo;s rise. More specifically, we will analyze the impact that China&rsquo;s emergence has had and will have on the existing global economic-financial order (e.g., AIIB, BRI). Last but certainly not least, we will explore how China&rsquo;s emergence as a global power has affected and will affect Sino-US relations. We also will seek to understand the medium-term military-diplomatic dynamics in East Asia, more generally, and Washington&rsquo;s and Beijing&rsquo;s medium-term strategies, more specifically.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9094  Religion and Secularism in Global Affairs  (0 Credits)  
In the late 20th century, few predicted that religion would play a significant role in global affairs; today, religion&#8217;s impact cannot be denied. Will the rise of religion in the 21st century lead to unity or greater fragmentation? Or will secularism re-emerge? Discuss the global resurgence of religious ideology in key regions, including the Middle East, Africa, Europe, and Asia; the role of sectarian movements in conflict; trends toward orthodoxy or liberalization; and ways that religious and national identities merge. Finally, examine the efforts of some religious movements to promote peace building and development, to bridge ideological divides, and to facilitate conflict resolution.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9095  International Law in the International Political System  (0 Credits)  
<p>Gain a broad introduction to the field of international law through the examination of the history and development of legal doctrines, institutional and administrative structures, and contemporary international legal issues that have come to define global affairs. Examine topics such as sources of international law, the law of treaties, international and regional organizations, international human rights law, sovereignty, state responsibility, collective security, peacekeeping, the rise of nonstate actors, and the peaceful settlement of disputes. In addition to attending online lectures, engage in online discussions related to current events that provide an opportunity to explore the relationships among law, culture, and politics in global affairs. By the end of this course, be conversant in the basic principles and doctrines of international law. In addition, have a better understanding of the international and regional mechanisms and institutions available to protect and promote human rights and to resolve international disputes peacefully.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9096  Writing Clinic for Global Professionals  (0 Credits)  
Effective technical writing is an essential skill for global professionals. Gain the techniques to improve the effectiveness and accessibility of your technical writing&mdash;whether in business, economics, finance, or law&mdash;by enhancing the clarity, completeness, conciseness, and correctness of written communications, while keeping in mind the intended audience. This training aims to improve the content, structure, and flow of writing, as well as its style. The course first will address the critical importance of effective writing skills and the barriers to it in corporate and government settings. Next, it will cover the essential tools for transforming turgid, academic, or bureaucratic writing into lively prose that meets its strategic goals. The class will include workshop exercises. <em><strong>Note:</strong> Students will be expected to provide unedited samples of their writing (two pages, double-spaced) 10 days prior to the course start date.</em>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9097  The Future of Europe: Prospects for the World's Great Integration Experiment  (0 Credits)  
This course will examine the future of Europe and its potential impact on the world stage. The European project to integrate the continent into a peaceful region of economic prosperity has made slow but steady progress since it officially began in 1954 with just six countries in a coal and steel community. It has since become the envy of all other regional integration schemes. Today the European Union (EU) with 28 member countries, 19 of which share a common currency, is the world&rsquo;s best example of successful economic integration. Yet there are many serious problems stemming from within and without, including sovereign debt crises; nearly two million war refugees streaming into member states; sluggish growth; Russian provocations; and terrorism, both external and homegrown. However, the June 2016 UK vote to leave the EU is perhaps its greatest existential threat. Will the EU survive? And if it does, how can it best contribute to global peace and prosperity?
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9098  Reaching Your Goals: Monitoring and Evaluation for Civil Society Organizations  (0 Credits)  
Gain a firm grasp of the concepts and vocabulary of program evaluation, focusing on the relevance of results from helping not-for-profit organizations reach their goals. Through a series of exercises, create evaluation questions, select the best methods for evaluation work, discuss processes to collect and analyze data, and learn how to interpret and utilize evaluation findings. Examples are drawn from a variety of sectors to address the challenges typically faced by evaluators working with marginalized or hard-to-reach populations.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9099  A Holistic Look at Iran: Economics, Religion, Politics, and More  (0 Credits)  
<p>Although Iran is in the news on a regular basis, its portrayal is often incomplete, confusing, and opaque with a plethora of contradictory information about its structure at all levels&mdash;from its very geography to its body politic. Yet, Iran is a significant geopolitical entity with its own priorities, history, goals, and challenges in our constantly evolving world. By considering Iran holistically&mdash;its environment, ethno-religious-linguistic composition, economics, history, and politics; one can gain an understanding of the complexity of Iranian culture, society and polity. The course will give a context to better understand how Iran views itself, its geopolitical position, motives and constraints when interacting with various neighbors and world powers.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9103  Clean Tech: Developments, Trends, and Opportunities  (0 Credits)  
Driven in part by the looming threat of climate change, the world is slowly transitioning to cleaner and smarter consumption and production. Examine developments in renewable energy and energy efficiency, electricity transmission and distribution, green building, transportation, pollution control, waste management, and agriculture. Using <i>Reinventing Fire</i> from the Rocky Mountain Institute and a number of other materials, gain familiarity with a range of current critical issues confronting clean technologies.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9104  The Political Economy of Development  (0 Credits)  
Examine the various issues and problems associated with economic growth and development from both classical and Marxist perspectives. Read case studies from East Asia and Latin America; explore the challenges posed by economies in transition in Central and Eastern Europe; and consider the experiences of industrial countries with specific reference to their less-developed regions. In particular, we decipher the conditions that allow for economic growth and seek to understand the relationship between economic growth and human development.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9105  Midterm Election Snapshot: Trump Foreign Policy, Politics, and the Global Stage  (2 Credits)  
Approaching the midpoint of Donald Trump&rsquo;s term, the fall 2018 US elections will provide insight into the electorate&rsquo;s assessment of an emerging &ldquo;Trump Doctrine.&rdquo; This course will address the key elements of the administration&rsquo;s foreign policy in historical and electoral contexts, as well as its effect on the global security landscape. It will conclude with post-election analysis of the implications for governing in the second half of the Trump administration, the 2020 presidential contest, and the United States&rsquo; leadership role in the world. Guest speakers will include political strategist Mark Siegel on foreign affairs, election issues, and implications for 2020.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9107  Energy: Growth, Analysis, Financing  (0 Credits)  
<p>The energy sector has become a major driver in the global economy. Further growth is inevitable, as developing economies struggle to reach parity with the developed world, magnifying both the demand for energy and the need for innovations in renewable energy and alternative exploration methods. Those working in the sector, whether in financing, development, or markets, must understand this changing landscape and its potential outcomes in the next decades. Examine areas such as energy policy, the geopolitics of energy, and power generation while strengthening critical skills necessary for working and leading in the sector&#8211;&#8211;risk analysis, project financing and modeling, futures, and data interpretation and analysis&#8211;&#8211;in this comprehensive intensive led by industry experts.</p><p><b>FEATURED LECTURERS</b></p><p><b>KEVIN CHEN, Founding Partner and Chief Investment Officer, ACM Global Macro</b></p><p>Kevin Chen is a founding partner and chief investment officer of ACM Global Macro hedge fund. He was senior portfolio manager at Amundi Alternative Investment, a merged asset management entity of Cr&#233;dit Agricole and Soci&#233;t&#233; G&#233;n&#233;rale. He was responsible for constructing and managing multi-billion-dollar hedge fund portfolios for institutional clients. Previously, he was director of asset allocation for Morgan Stanley, and his responsibilities included designing and delivering comprehensive hedge funds advisory solutions to U.S. and international high-net-wealth and institutional clients. Chen joined Morgan Stanley after graduating with a Ph.D. in finance in 2004 from the International Center for Financial Asset Management and Engineering (FAME), Geneva, and the University of Lausanne, Switzerland. Chen also served as a consultant for several Swiss-based organizations, including the Swiss Organization for Facilitating Investments, a joint initiative of the Swiss State Secretariat for Economic Affairs (SECO) in cooperation with KPMG. Prior to that, Chen earned a master&#8217;s degree in finance from CentER for Economic Research, Tilburg University, the Netherlands, and a bachelor&#8217;s degree in economics from Renmin University of China. He spent two years working for China Development Bank&#8217;s International Finance Department and Investment Banking Department. He is a co-founder of CCC, a New York-based charity that works on improving cultural understanding and mentors underprivileged teenagers. In addition, he is a founding council member of Absolute Return Investment Association of China and a member of Soci&#233;t&#233; Acad&#233;mique Vaudoise.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9108  Transitions: The New Administration and the Global Political Landscape  (0 Credits)  
U.S. President Barack Obama will face significant foreign policy challenges and uncertainties from the outset of his term. These challenges and issues will be compounded by dramatic and unpredictable factors, including citizen empowerment through new media and social and religious movements. Examine the current administration&#8217;s foreign policy and corresponding public diplomacy in the context of emerging political models and global opinion. Specific focus is given to the Arab-Muslim world, China, and climate change. Additionally, students evaluate the new administration&#8217;s emerging foreign policy doctrine in terms of its ability to formulate longer-term strategic responses to the evolving world order.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9109  Disinformation and the Threat to Democracy  (0 Credits)  
In the final weeks of the 2020 election, we&rsquo;ll examine the historic roots and the current realities of disinformation and its impact on democracy. So-called &ldquo;fake news&rdquo;&mdash;both the accusation and the reality&mdash;is not new, nor is it confined to the United States. It has deep roots in the birth of contemporary media and totalitarian propaganda. What we&rsquo;re seeing today is different because of the technological revolution that has decimated the news business, created new publishing powerhouses, and allowed information and disinformation to cross borders rapidly and at scale. This course examines the history of disinformation, the business reasons for its rise today, its international impact, the domestic cultural and political effects, the media&rsquo;s response, and the future of public policy responses. How did we get into this crisis and where do our media and politics go from here?
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9112  Tools for Project Evaluation: Surveys, Focus Groups, and Interviews  (0 Credits)  
This course emphasizes the use and critical importance of evaluation in the daily work of not-for-profit organizations. It introduces you to the fundamentals of program evaluation, including how to create logic models, to identify appropriate types of evaluation for different phases of program creation and implementation, to select and implement data collection methods, and to analyze and present program evaluation effectively. Case studies from a variety of sources, including your own experiences, inform part of the course.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9113  The New Global Middle Class: Understanding the World's Largest Market  (0 Credits)  
Examine the new concept of an emerging global middle class and its impact on economic development policy, private industry, and finance. This trend is perhaps the most important and exciting outcome of modern globalization. This course explores best policies and strategies for growing a middle class; the roles of private foreign finance, investment, and trade; and the consumer behaviors and cultural effects of those with new purchasing power. Also, discuss how new expectations and frustrations are best managed and whether or not a growing middle class promotes increasing stability and prosperity.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9117  The Future of Taiwan: Critical Implications for the US and Mainland China  (0 Credits)  
<p>The 1979 Taiwan Relations Act is often referred to as the bedrock of the relationship between the United States and the Republic of China. However, in December 2016, then-President-Elect Donald Trump took a call from Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen, which given historic US diplomatic relations with mainland China, no US president in more than 40 years has done in order to respect the &ldquo;One China&rdquo; policy. Moreover, the then-president-elect went on to state that the United States is not necessarily bound to the One China policy. In China, perceptions and tradition are important. China&rsquo;s response was swift, with Beijing saying that it has &ldquo;serious concerns&rdquo; about Trump&rsquo;s position on Taiwan and international trade, and one state-run newspaper describing the president-elect as &ldquo;ignorant as a child&rdquo; in the field of diplomacy. This course will explicate the tensions in US foreign policy regarding Taiwan since the 1980s and provide a critical lens by which to analyze cross-strait relations. What are the geopolitical risks involved and how do these impact perceptions of investors, trade, and cross-border flows? In class, you will have the opportunity to develop and hone your negotiating skills. Also, gain a stronger conceptual and analytical framework by which to understand the US-Taiwan relations, which will help further to equip and prepare you for private sector, government, or other related careers.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9118  Introduction to Human Rights: History and Practice  (0 Credits)  
This course provides an introduction to the theory, the politics, and the social science of human rights and international security. We will examine how one can think about human rights as a product of history and how the language of human rights has evolved as a response to changing international dilemmas. We will explore historical human rights cases from around the world, including Latin America, Rwanda, and Bosnia, and through the lens of US foreign policy. Throughout the course, we will avoid a triumphal story of how contemporary Western morality came to dominate global discourse; rather, we will look carefully at the formal international legal regime that has evolved around human rights since World War II. We will examine how human rights have been deployed in social and political conflicts around the globe, and we will study how societies have approached justice when massive violations have occurred. At the end of the course, we will challenge assumptions about how human rights first arose as a global phenomenon and assess the conflicted legacy of human rights over the last several decades.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9120  Political Risk Management for Global Corporations  (0 Credits)  
Changes in the global political environment can have sudden and massive impacts on business strategy. Now more than ever, effective partners require a sophisticated understanding of the drivers and measures of political risk. They and their organizations need a plan for managing political risk exposure, asset allocation, and market entry in frontier and emerging economies in order to survive and thrive. This course will discuss global political risk management as an emerging discipline across functional and geographic leadership at large corporations, and its implications for businesses globally. The course will offer an assessment of the global risk environment and the basis for determining how politics influences a variety of economic concerns, including a detailed framework around political risk management for multinational business across sectors.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9127  African Civil Wars  (0 Credits)  
Since the end of the Cold War, nearly half of African countries have experienced at least one period of violent internal conflict. The origins and impact of these conflicts are multifaceted, including ethnic and economic inequalities, social or political exclusion, and competition for scarce natural resources. Investigate the dynamics and drivers of civil wars, the rate of recidivism, the reasons that some conflicts last longer than others, the strategies used by armed factions, and the mechanisms utilized by international and regional actors to resolve conflicts.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9147  National Security: Intelligence and Homeland Security Agencies for the 21st Century  (0 Credits)  
For more than 70 years, the United States Intelligence Community (USIC) has worked tirelessly to meet an ever-changing set of global issues. Having continuously evolved from World War II through the Cold War, the USIC was once again forced to adapt after the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, but this time by developing intersections across the newly formed Homeland Security agencies. These agencies and the USIC both exist to serve a broad set of stakeholders in often dynamic and shifting global and domestic environments. This course reviews the history of these agencies from World War II to the fight against &ldquo;homegrown&rdquo; terrorism and the protection of critical infrastructure. It provides an introduction to the legislative and executive framework that has guided them during these periods of conflict, a review of each agency&rsquo;s role, and a survey of documented successes and failures.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9148  Intro to Technology and Analytics for the Global Nonprofit  (0 Credits)  
Nonprofits work to change the world, but how can they effectively assess and measure their impact? This course&mdash;geared toward individuals in, or thinking of getting involved in, the nonprofit sphere&mdash;imparts the skills needed to track and measure an organization&rsquo;s impact. After an introduction to the theory of impact mapping, you will gain a foundation in Google Analytics so you can work toward certification. Learn how to employ social media advertising and branding and how to apply for, manage, and utilize Google AdWords as an impact tool. At the end of the course, you will leave with both the theoretical grounding and the technological skills that can be applied at any social impact organization.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9149  Science, Technology, and the Global Landscape  (0 Credits)  
Examine how scientific and technological advancements can have unforeseen and far-reaching global consequences in areas such as security, energy, communications, and business. Learn how recent advancements are transforming our world and explore whether or not global ethics can keep pace with innovation. Topics include terrorists' access to nuclear arms; the resounding impact of disappearing animal species; how optical cables transfer data and what that means for communications, business, and espionage; deforestation; and localized viruses becoming a worldwide threat.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9150  Investing for Environmental and Social Benefits  (0 Credits)  
Impact investors seek to generate environmental and social impacts in addition to financial returns. This one-day seminar introduces you to how markets can solve critical social and environmental challenges. While this approach has long been used within the public sector and by NGOs, commercial investors are increasingly embracing this strategy in fields such as energy, water, community development, health, sustainable development, and education. The course draws upon principles of finance, theories of change, public policy, and investment management to evaluate specific cases and investment tools.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9151  Foundations of Nonprofits and NGOs: Management, Evaluation, and Public Policy  (0 Credits)  
Examine nonprofit policy issues at the international, national, and local levels. Evaluate the state of nonprofits, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and philanthropic institutions from the perspective of nonprofit management and program assessment. Gain an understanding of how the philanthropy, nonprofit, and NGO sectors operate, while examining their niche alongside private and public sectors, their revenue sources, their impact on society, and the converse effects of society and its institutions on them. Explore the impact of dependence on government support for NGOs that work in developing countries, faith-based service provisions, accountability and transparency, advocacy, and government relations. Upon completion of this course, students will have an understanding of nonprofits&rsquo; contribution to public policy and insights to evaluate successful programs and to navigate the unique challenges of international work.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9152  The Business of International Political Risk Management  (0 Credits)  
Companies from tech to energy, and from retail to finance, operate in increasingly volatile environments&ndash;&ndash;and not just in emerging and frontier markets. Political risk is now a quarter-century-old discipline that helps companies in all sectors to grow their businesses while managing for risk and opportunity along the way. Looked at broadly, the international political risk consulting business is no longer a cottage industry comprised solely of former government officials, but a diverse mix of globally active boutiques and consultancies addressing the rapidly growing need for professionals with very particular skills and experience. Gain an understanding of the discipline in its various forms, including political risk. Topics include diligence, business intelligence, investigations, security consulting, and others services whose goal is to help navigate an increasingly complex world. Discuss skill sets, valuable experience, and career paths within this framework.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9153  Assessing Risks in Emerging Markets  (0 Credits)  
Foreign investors and businesses have been aggressively pursuing opportunities in the developing world for more than 25 years with mixed results. Doing business or investing in the developing world presents a number of challenges, which if anticipated and addressed, can be the difference between success and failure. Through recorded weekly lectures and interviews, readings, and assignments, you will investigate the spectrum of political, economic, and cultural challenges, as well as legal and business risks, in the developing world. What is the right balance between risks and rewards, and how can risks be converted into opportunities? Why is it so critical to perform due diligence and analysis before committing to an investment? This course has a strong case-study focus and is designed for business managers, investment professionals, and entrepreneurs who are seeking to or currently work in emerging markets. Upon completion of the course, you will have a practical understanding of the necessary tools to identify, assess, and mitigate key risks and challenges in emerging markets.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9154  When the President Speaks: Perspectives on Foreign Policy and Global Communication  (0 Credits)  
President Trump&rsquo;s rhetoric and his use of social media have brought a renewed focus on how US foreign policy is communicated to the world. This course will examine how the administration communicates key global policies and how these messages are covered abroad. Through case studies from World War II through the Obama administration, students will gain historical context on how past presidents have articulated and disseminated foreign policy to leverage public diplomacy. This course will use source materials and real-time developments in readings and active class discussions.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9155  Clean Energy Capstone Project: Putting Knowledge to Practice  (3 Credits)  
<p>In this Capstone course, students work in teams of four to six on a specific project with an energy or cleantech company. The project will provide students with the opportunity to apply the previously developed skills and the knowledge they learned through the previous certificate courses to real-life problems faced by companies.<meta charset="utf-8" /></p><br><br><br><br><p dir="ltr">EXAMPLES OF TYPES OF PROJECTS:</p><br><br><br><br><ul dir="ltr"><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Modeling Community</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Operational Efficiency</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Microgrid Suitability (UGE)</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Microgrid Business Model</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Assessment of the Marketing Storage</li><br><br></ul><br><br><br><br><p>This course will feature a mix of synchronous and asynchronous sessions that provide content and reinforce learning outcomes. Synchronous sessions are outlined in the course schedule listed on this page.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9156  Analytics for Energy Professionals  (2 Credits)  
<p>The ability to understand, and make sense of, energy data is an imperative in today&rsquo;s fast-paced energy sector, whether it involves supply, demand, or prices. This course analyzes planning and real-time data and teaches energy-market specific interpretation and data analysis. Students will be charged with acquiring and interpreting data in the context of an energy scenario. Students will gain the knowledge and experience necessary to understand energy analytics and its applications to decision making in the clean energy industry. Topics to be covered include an overview of energy markets, energy end uses, common energy data sources, and the analysis of related financials.</p><br><br><br><br><p>COURSE TOPICS:</p><br><br><br><br><p><meta charset="utf-8" /></p><br><br><br><br><ul dir="ltr"><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Large-scale energy markets</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Wholesale and regional markets&nbsp;</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Utility regulations&nbsp;</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Planning and rates&nbsp;</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Analysis and trends</li><br><br></ul>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9157  Clean Energy Entrepreneurship  (3 Credits)  
<p>Entrepreneurship and venture creation are key agents of innovation within the cleantech sector. This course will examine strategies and methods that are essential for creating and sustaining startups, early-stage companies, and small-business enterprises. Topics include strategic assessment and decision-making; financial, human, and technology resource management; and tools and tactics for marketing specifically geared toward entrepreneurs. Sessions also will include lessons on investments, venture capital, public and private grantmaking opportunities, and other forms of startup capital. The course will conclude with students&rsquo; developing and producing a financial model. By the end of the course, students will gain the knowledge and experience necessary to create and operate a lean startup and bring clean technologies to market. The skills gained in this course not only apply to cleantech startups but also can be leveraged for a variety of careers.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>COURSE TOPICS:&nbsp;<meta charset="utf-8" /></p><br><br><br><br><ul dir="ltr"><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Customer discovery&nbsp;</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Business model generation&nbsp;</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Ideation and value proposition</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Financial forecasting</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Strategic assessment and decision-making</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Financial, human, and technology resource management</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Marketing strategies for entrepreneurs</li><br><br></ul>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9164  The Rise of East Asia: Regional Trends and U.S. Foreign Policy Implications  (0 Credits)  
Explore the economic, political, and governance issues in East Asia, a region in which America's strategic future lies. Topics analyzed include the economic and strategic rise of Asia; regional governance and norms; economic, political, and human rights trends; and U.S. policy response. The course focuses on five subregions: China, Japan, the Koreas, Australia, and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). The course includes group presentations of these regions, class simulation of policy debates, YouTube and podcast resources from the Carnegie Council, and Twitter and other technologies.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9167  Introduction to Homeland Security: A Critical Infrastructure Perspective  (0 Credits)  
Energy and water, communications and transportation, and everything in between&mdash;these are the essential elements of any developed society. Few events have a greater impact on the delivery of goods and services than an interruption to any one of these sectors. The protection and resilience of these critical services are vital to the preparedness and post-disaster activities of governments, emergency responders, and the private sector. This course will analyze the critical issues that are associated with infrastructure protection and risk-reduction activities. It will provide a framework for identifying and organizing critical infrastructure, as well as the legislative and regulatory authorities responsible for its protection and resilience.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9172  Writing About Global Affairs  (0 Credits)  
From op-ed pieces to press releases, writing serves as the foundation of a career in global affairs. Explore the essential forms of writing, whether you are working for an international organization, an NGO, an advocacy group, or a media organization. Topics include memoranda, speeches, official reports and diplomatic correspondence, briefings, and public commentary. Gain exposure to the trappings and techniques of the writing trade as they relate to global affairs, and try your hand at various forms of communication.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9180  Media and Global Affairs Intensive  (0 Credits)  
Freedom of expression is a basic human right and a pillar of democracy, yet journalism is always contentious because it challenges those who hold power. Journalists face death not only in war zones but also from extremist assassins in Syria and France, from drug cartels in Mexico, and from corrupt politicians in Brazil. In China, Russia, Iran, and Turkey, governments punish critics by jailing journalists or taking over news organizations. The US, the EU, and other Western countries champion freedom of the press, but politicians castigate the media, and many news outlets struggle to survive financially. As we examine the role of the news media in national and international affairs, the class will learn about the news-gathering process; journalism ethics and abuses; and journalists&rsquo; efforts to change society in Latin America, Eastern Europe, Africa, and the Arab world. We will review news reporting on current issues, such as the Syria conflict and the US elections, and we will discuss the role of journalism in a world of rapid technological and social change.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9181  The Great Game of Sports and Politics  (0 Credits)  
Despite frequent claims that politics should not be mixed in with sports, modern athletic competition is a major arena for states, international organizations, and advocacy groups to advance their objectives. Sports and politics mix all the time. In this course, we will discuss four main themes about the intersection of sports and politics: peace and security; social progress on race, gender, and disability; corruption and doping; and national reputation. We will consider historical examples, such as how Germany used the 1936 Olympics in Berlin to parade Nazi rule, and how South Africa&rsquo;s exclusion from world competition helped end apartheid. Our discussions also will address more recent issues, including efforts by China, Qatar, and North Korea to burnish their international images by hosting major sporting events and the effects of major doping scandals on Russia&rsquo;s reputation. We will examine some of the major sports organizations&mdash;the International Olympic Committee, the soccer governing body FIFA, and college and professional sports associations in the United States&mdash;because, in each of these settings, sports have become business empires and often vehicles for massive corruption. While sports have been used to advance racial equality and rights of persons with disabilities, the situation is more complex on gender equality, particularly as sports officials attempt to define who qualifies as a woman.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9195  Global Conflict and the Crisis of Diplomacy  (0 Credits)  
Examine the impact of World War I on the first half of the 20th century, including the emergence of international communism and fascism and the rise of single-party dictatorships. Explore why China succumbed to internal collapse, how foreign policy was formulated in Japan, and how Japan&rsquo;s &ldquo;China War&rdquo; led Tokyo into conflict with the United States. Learn about the Wannsee Conference and its importance in the history of the Holocaust. The great controversies of the world wars are examined through diplomatic documents, diaries, and film.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9196  Ideology, War, and Revolution  (0 Credits)  
Examine the powerful forces that shaped the rise of Europe and the West from the French Revolution to World War I. Why was the French Revolution regarded as the watershed of the modern era? Why were Metternich's conservative principles unable to contain the forces unleashed by the French Revolution? What was the impact of industrialization on European society? What were the origins of European imperialism and how did it affect the indigenous societies of Africa and Asia? Was World War I the culmination of these forces? View this period of cataclysmic change through diaries, documents, and contemporary literature.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9197  Economic Emergence and Global Power: The Rise of China  (0 Credits)  
In the past 30 years, China has experienced unprecedented development, emerging as a global economic, financial, political, and military power. Analyze how this occurred and what the results have been. Discuss the Chinese economic model (the Beijing consensus) in a comparative perspective and assess its future viability. Understand how China&#8217;s emergence has changed the existing global economic/financial order and what the impact is of its investment and development efforts abroad. Last but not least, examine how China&#8217;s emergence as a global power has been affecting Beijing&#8217;s relations with the U.S. and its Asian neighbors.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9205  Espionage: Fact vs. Fiction  (1 Credit)  
<p><strong>Register for this Spring 2024 course on the <a href="https://nyusps.gatherlearning.com/events/espionage-fact-vs-fiction---spring-2024">NYU SPS Academy of Lifelong Learning website</a>.</strong></p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>Spy thrillers are a staple of fiction, film, and television, but how close do they come to the reality of espionage? The premise of this course is that no function of government has been as distorted by popular culture as that of intelligence, to the detriment of an informed citizenry. In a series of eight interactive sessions, Espionage: Fact vs. Fiction will separate myth from reality in the conduct of human intelligence. Taught by a veteran intelligence professional, this course will blend analysis of nonfiction sources with critical reading of selected works of fiction. Upon completion, you will still be able to enjoy a good spy novel but will also have a more realistic appreciation of the vital role of human intelligence in US national security.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p><strong>Spring 2024 tuition is $525.</strong></p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9206  The American Empire: Prospects for Power Projection in a Changing World  (0 Credits)  
The United States has dominated the globe militarily, politically, economically and culturally for about three quarters of a century. In the last 20 years, it has enjoyed a global dominance almost unparalleled in history. Examine the prospects for the "American Empire" through a sweeping overview of past empires, some of which endured for centuries. How is power won and lost? What challenges are faced within the continuous cycle of multi-, bi-, and uni-polar worlds? How does "smart power" find the optimal mix of "soft" and "hard" power; and is this the best strategy to continue to project American influence and interests during the current, momentous shifts in global geopolitics and economics?
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9207  The 2012 U.S. Election and Global Politics  (0 Credits)  
Global political issues are expected to play an important role in the primary and caucus campaign periods of the 2012 U.S. presidential election. In this online course, track and evaluate international foreign affairs in key regions as they relate to candidates' positions and election dynamics during the campaign season. Using multimedia resources, work interactively with both the instructor and outside authorities--including experts in foreign affairs and the U.S. political system--to relate campaign rhetoric and strategies to unfolding world events.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9208  Foreign Affairs and the 2012 U.S. Election: Policies, Politics and Publics  (0 Credits)  
Examine foreign affairs as they relate to the 2012 U.S. presidential campaign, with a special focus on developments in key world regions; domestic and international public opinion; and global social, broadcast, and print media. Evaluate the relationship between global policies, politics, and public opinion in the run-up to the election. The Obama administration's developing policies and the resulting Republican rhetoric in caucus and primary debates, unfolding global events, course materials on public opinion and strategic communication, and guest speakers provide a context for analysis and lively class discussion.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9210  International Relations  (0 Credits)  
<p>Gain an in-depth understanding of the world order that emerged following the Cold War, and explore how that era continues to shape the geopolitical and economic landscapes of our contemporary world. Consider the principal theories and history of international relations, and analyze the key dimensions of Cold War politics&mdash;competing ideologies, threats, and challenges. Examine the critical events and policies from the Cold War to the War on Terror, including the legacy of colonialism; European Union enlargement and economic integration; nuclear proliferation; globalization; the emergence of new players on the economic scene; and &ldquo;issues without borders,&rdquo; such as climate change, human rights, trafficking, immigration, and global pandemics. Discuss the influence that key leaders, international organizations, civil society groups, and technology have in shaping the world as we know it today.</p><br><br><br><br><p><meta charset="utf-8" /></p><br><br><br><br><p dir="ltr">COURSE TOPICS:</p><br><br><br><br><ul dir="ltr"><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>International Relations Theory</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Power, Anarchy and Statecrafts in the International System</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Actors in International Politics: States, Institutions and Individuals&nbsp;</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>The Rise of Non-State Actors&nbsp;</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>The Use of Force: Deterrence, Coercion and War&nbsp;</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Cooperation and International Society&nbsp;</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Sovereignty and Intervention</li><br><br></ul><br><br><br><br><p>This course is eligible towards the completion of the <a href="https://www.sps.nyu.edu/professional-pathways/certificates/global-affairs-and-fundraising/global-affairs.html">Certificate in Global Affairs</a>. Bundle your coursework and earn a professional credential that communicates knowledge and skills gained. Declared Certificate students receive 10% off of courses within the program.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9211  The Natural Gas Revolution  (0 Credits)  
Over the past decade, new natural gas technologies and related developments have begun to redefine the energy sector and economies worldwide. The opening of vast new domestic natural gas reserves has quickly placed the long-held goal of American energy independence within reach. Initial improvements to the U.S. carbon emissions profile have displayed the significant potential for further progress. Balanced against these opportunities are other environmental risks that producers and regulatory authorities have started to mitigate through proactive measures and policies. Discover how, through decreasing the use of oil and coal, huge economic and investment potential has been created for governments, companies, and individuals.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9213  Contemporary Issues in Global Finance  (0 Credits)  
Delve into current media headlines and examine why macroeconomic policies of major countries are getting more complicated and less effective than in the past. Explore U.S. fiscal and monetary policy options to stimulate the economy, the European governments&#8217; worsening budget deficit problem, and China's current currency policy which might now be causing more harm than good for a country&nbsp;that is facing a declining working population.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9215  Brazil's Economic Development  (0 Credits)  
Explore Brazil&rsquo;s economy (and politics). After a brief survey or Brazil&rsquo;s economic history, this course will focus on the political economy of structural reform, macroeconomic policy, and economic performance under the Cardoso, Lula, Dilma, and Temer governments. Discuss the outlook for successful economic reform under the new Bolsonaro government. Evaluate the country&rsquo;s economic performance and its position in the global economy through a comparison with other BRIC economies. Delve into the economic challenges Brazil is facing and will continue to face in the future, and consider Brazil&rsquo;s foreign relations with other major powers, with a special emphasis on China.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9217  Torture in the 21st Century: History, Ethics, and Human Rights  (0 Credits)  
Torture persists today as one of the most widespread human rights crimes. It is practiced in over 100 countries, including so-called liberal democracies. Examine what constitutes torture, and discuss the theory behind utilizing torture as a method of coercive interrogation. Determine how to situate present-day debates over the use of torture within a broader historical context, and investigate what psychological factors drive people to torture. Analyze whether or not there are any circumstances under which torture is justified, and delve into the relationship between torturer and victim. Case studies, including the use of torture post-9/11 in Afghanistan and Iraq, illustrate its contemporary practice and the existing domestic and international standards and mechanisms for protection and punishment.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9218  People Power: Social Movements and Civil Society  (0 Credits)  
Key to understanding civil society is examining its role in domestic politics and global affairs. Trace and analyze the historical trajectory of the concept of &#8220;civil society.&#8221; Then, examine the role civil society plays in economic, political, and social development, including an analysis of such complex issues as legitimacy, accountability, and the effectiveness of civil society in state, regional, and global governance. The course concludes with an exploration of the role of civil society in recent domestic and global events, including the Arab Spring and the Occupy movement.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9219  Radical Practice: Applied Arts for Social Justice  (0 Credits)  
Grassroots creative projects offer unique opportunities for exploring conflict and justice and can sometimes serve as catalysts for cultural and political change. But how exactly do these activities make space for change and what are the societal underpinnings necessary to sustain the change these works seek to create? Through case studies, explore the work of the Belarus Free Theatre; the Philadelphia-based Mural Arts Project; the work of Afghanistan Human Rights Democracy Organization; the New York-based Bond Street Theatre in Afghanistan; the storytelling and applied theatre-based project, We Are Here Now in the Rio Grande Valley; and the hip-hop dance movements in Ghana and South Africa. Engage with an array of artists and practitioners who are experts in their fields, providing opportunities to ask questions and become familiar with how art practices impact the world around them.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9240  Emerging Market Economies: Understanding the Critical Challenges  (0 Credits)  
In the last 20 years, emerging market countries have not only been the subject of economic admiration but also a concern and risk to the global community. Examine the major issues facing these countries. How does the intersection of natural wealth, economic development, and diverse political environments affect these countries? How can these new growing economies become stable and successful despite their disparate histories and governmental structures? Through case studies of Latin America and South Asia, we confront the challenges of trade policy, natural resource preservation, demanding youthful populations, and the creation of new political models.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9251  The Politics of International Economic Relations  (0 Credits)  
Examine the critical issues facing global affairs from a political-economic context. Explore the current issues of our changing world, accelerated by the interdependence upon, and conflicts caused by, globalization. Discuss the vanishing &ldquo;North-South&rdquo; dynamics of the post-World War II economic order. Also, examine the impact that trade protectionism and resource geopolitics have on new global governance and on nations&rsquo; ability to address crises in finance, energy, climate change, population growth, health, economic disparities, and terrorism. Other topics include the basics of international markets for goods and services, labor, finance, knowledge, and technology, as well as the roles in international relations of multinational enterprises, banks, NGOs, governments, and multilateral institutions.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9267  Global Climate Change  (0 Credits)  
Examine the complexities of climate change and its current impact on a global scale. Topics include the potentially alarming repercussions if climate change is not addressed aggressively, the history of the issue, ways in which climate change informs economics as well as domestic and international politics, policy debates and the influence of special interests, the role of the media in addressing climate change issues, and the political psychology involved.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9268  The Global Race for Supremacy in Renewable Energy: Who Is Winning?  (0 Credits)  
The world is racing toward the next great phase of human innovation, or the fifth industrial revolution. The country that invests in, discovers, and commercializes renewable energy sources that will dominate the century also will win great global economic and political power for generations to come. Gain a comparative perspective on these efforts among China, Europe, India, Japan, and the United States.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9274  The Middle East: Foundations and Emerging Orders  (0 Credits)  
An understanding of ideological foundations is essential to examining Middle East politics today. While regional similarities and common themes exist, unique psychological, emotional, historical, and religious perspectives shape the conflicts in each country. Explore how these behind-the-scenes perspectives and events shape policy in Middle Eastern states today, including in Egypt, Syria, Jordan, Palestine, Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq, Tunisia, Morocco, and Libya. Discuss the role of the U.S. and its efforts to shape the new orders in these countries&#8212;now and in the years to come.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9275  The Middle East  (0 Credits)  
<p><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt">As the Middle East continue</span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt">s</span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt"> to rage in the wake of the Arab Spring, old geopolitical alignments now face new challenges&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt">to </span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt">the </span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt">region as well </span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt">as </span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt">to </span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt">outside powers that have substantial</span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt"> economic interests and national security concerns.</span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt"> </span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt">Analyze what kind of realignment may occur, what type </span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt">of a new political order</span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt"> may emerge in various Arab states</span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt">, how</span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt"> that </span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt">might </span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt">affect</span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt"> the region&#8217;s stability&#8211;&#8211;as well as the</span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt">&nbsp;prospect </span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt">of peace</span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt"> between Israel and the Arab states</span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt">.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt">F</span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt">inally,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt">discuss </span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt">the </span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt">centrality of economic development</span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt"> </span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt">and why it must occur concurrently with political reforms</span><span style="font-family:'Times New Roman';font-size:12pt"> to achieve sustainable peace and prosperity.</span></p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9277  World Politics: The Age of Transition  (0 Credits)  
World politics is in an era of transition--old patterns of power are changing as new forces and features emerge. How much economic strength will rising non-Western nations like China and India gain? What are the consequences of the increasing importance of other non-Western countries such as Turkey, Brazil, and South Korea? Will the Middle East become more unstable as leadership transitions begin in Egypt and Saudi Arabia, internal tensions rise in Iran, and the Israeli-Palestinian situation remains unresolved? Will Afghanistan and Pakistan collapse? Can Japan recover? Does the West, led by America, have the capacity to face these new global challenges? These and other political, economic, and security issues suggest that the next decade could see dramatic shifts in the traditional global order. Who will the winners and losers be? What are the implications for America? Examine these and other questions in the context of current world events.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9278  World Politics: Revolutions and Power  (0 Credits)  
Revolutions have a long history and have changed the destiny of nations and the global power structure. Yet, in recent years, revolutions have been infrequent and appear to have faded as a means of political action. Now, quite unexpectedly, revolutions have returned--transforming the Middle East. Are we entering a new Age of Revolution? How will the recent upheavals affect the Middle East politically--and the world economically? What other regions could have similar uprisings--China, Russia, and South and Central Asia? Is economic crisis a catalyst for upheavals in Europe? Are the Middle East uprisings a model for parts of Latin America and Africa? Is a democratic wave in the making? How will this impact the global balance of political and economic power? How will America act and react--and how will American foreign policy evolve? Who will be the potential winners and losers? This course examines these and other key global issues in the context of current events.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9279  World Politics: Power and New Leaders  (0 Credits)  
Within the next two years or so, most of the world's major nations will have an opportunity to select new leaders. In 2012, America, Germany and France go to the polls. China will have a new leader as will Japan. Russia would have selected its next President. In Latin America, a new Mexican president will join recently elected leaders in Brazil, Argentina and Peru. Venezuela has elections and the transfer of power will continue in Cuba. In the Middle East, new leaders will begin to emerge out of the revolutionary upheavals and Israel goes to the polls in early 2013. In Africa, too, many leadership changes will take place. All this suggests that a major change is underway among key global decision makers. Who are these personalities likely to be? How will they confront critical world issues--conflict, terrorism, nuclear proliferation, energy security, environmental concerns and economic crises? How will they deal with increasingly important non-governmental forces (e.g. terrorists, crime cartels, religious radicals, revolutionary activists, etc)? The shape of the 21st century will largely be determined by the policies and approaches of this next cohort of leaders. This course will examine these concerns and outcomes in the context of current global events.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9280  World Politics: End of the Old Order?  (0 Credits)  
Major changes are taking place in world politics and economics. In politics, the usual democratic and authoritarian forms of government are under pressure and a new kind of quasi-democratic/semi-dictatorship is emerging as an alternative. In economics, the global advance of capitalism is challenged by the expansion of state capitalism. The traditional global power structure dominated by the United States, Western Europe, and Japan is changing as China rises, India moves ahead, and several regional powers claim prominent places. Developments in the Middle East and in Russia contribute to these uncertainties. How will all these happenings affect world politics and economics? Can America retain world leadership? Will the euro collapse and set back European unity? How will the Middle East evolve and how will Israel cope with regional tensions? Will Iranian nuclear ambitions lead to war? What will be the impact on Africa, Latin America, and Asia? Many important countries have elections scheduled this year--how will their new governments respond? Is the current global economic crisis a reflection of these changes? Discuss these and other issues in the context of current global events.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9281  World Politics: Power and Protest  (0 Credits)  
<p>A wave of unexpected political protest has erupted in several important regions, including&nbsp;the Arab countries, Russia, Western Europe, India, Israel, Iran, parts of China, and even in America. These protests are directed against existing governments and power structures. What is the significance of such protests&#8211;&#8211;and how will they affect the politics of these areas? Will they bring change and reshape the future? Do they have revolutionary potential? How will they impact the political prospects of leaders such as Putin, Netanyahu, the Iranian clerics, the Chinese Politburo, and others? Will they influence critical situations, such as the Arab-Israeli conflict, the stability of China, and Russia&#8217;s future? Is a new era in world politics coming and what are the economic implications? Will these movements spread to Latin America and Africa? Who are the winners and losers? Discuss these and other key issues in the context of current world affairs.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9282  The Politics of Ethical Consumption: How Fair Trade Is Made  (0 Credits)  
Whether the products are ethically sourced, responsibly produced, or directly traded, today&rsquo;s ethical consumer is bombarded with opportunities to &ldquo;buy fair&rdquo;&mdash;but what does it all mean? Can consumer behavior in the Northern Hemisphere really ignite development in the Southern Hemisphere? Examine the history of the fair trade movement, explore the variety of systems developed to facilitate fair trade, and debate the politics of fair trade certification. Case studies and self-reflective activities help you&mdash;whether a consumer, trader, activist, or critic&mdash;to develop your own arguments about the politics of ethical consumption.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9283  World Politics: The Age of Uncertainty  (0 Credits)  
The combination of three current situations has created unusual uncertainties in global affairs: instabilities in major economies, dangerous conflicts between strategically located nations, and significant changes among world leaders. Explore how the economic conditions in America, Western Europe, and Japan have an impact on global stability as well as upon the slowdown in China, India, Brazil, and other important economies. Consider whether tensions in the Middle East, the South China Sea, and Africa will escalate&#8211;&#8211;and if states such as Iran, Syria, North Korea, and Pakistan could potentially be catalysts for larger struggles. Examine the role of politicized religion and non-state activists, the causes of regional international shift of political and economic power. Discuss these and other key issues in the context of current world events.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9284  World Politics: Confrontation or Cooperation?  (0 Credits)  
Conflicts between nations over international and internal issues have risen recently&#8212;from U.S. and Chinese trade disputes, Syria, the Arab Awakening, and Iran-Israel nuclear concerns to economic policy in the European Union, the Indo-Pak border, Islamic radicalism in North Africa, and minorities in the Caucasus. These conflicts involve several powerful countries, including the United States, China, Japan, Germany, Russia, the Gulf states, Israel, and India&#8212;and have implications for the future of democracy, religion, capitalism, techno-politics, and cross-border intervention. Examine why so many conflicts have arisen at this time, and explore whether or not they can be resolved through negotiation and cooperation, or only through war and confrontation. Speculate as to how the second Obama and Putin administrations will act and react, and whether the new Chinese leadership will embrace a forceful foreign policy. Explore how recent elections in Israel, Iran, Japan, and Pakistan have been affected by these situations, and how militant religious and nationalistic attitudes might influence outcomes. Examine these and other key questions in the context of current global events.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9285  World Politics: Transforming Global Power  (0 Credits)  
Several recent trends and developments are transforming international politics, including new communication technologies that accelerate globalization. Governments and international institutions are slow to respond while other transnational enterprises&#8212;multinational companies, radical religious groups, organized crime, and intellectual property thieves&#8212;move much faster in their global operations. New disputes over resource-rich areas in the China Seas, the Mediterranean, and the south Atlantic provoke potentially dangerous conflicts between major states. Changing technologies of warfare&#8212;e.g., cyberwars and drones&#8212;redefine military strength. There are political consequences of changes in &#8220;hot spots&#8221; such as East Asia and the Middle East, together with the outcomes of elections in Israel and Europe and the transitions in Latin America. How will such changes affect leading powers like the United States, China, Russia, and the European Union? What new alliances and antagonisms are likely to arise, and what impact will they have on the global balance of power? Is a major restructuring of international politics, economics, and security under way&#8212;and can the U.S. respond effectively? Discuss these, and other critical issues, in the context of current events.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9286  World Politics: The Struggle for Leadership  (0 Credits)  
<p>As new forces challenge the existing order, we now are finding ourselves in an era of intense competition for international leadership. Are we entering a period of prolonged global instability? At the top of the world structure, China emerges to challenge the United States&#8212;a contest that will dominate world affairs for the next decade or so. In addition, there are struggles for regional primacy between local powers competing to increase their influence within specific geographic zones. As a consequence of upheavals in the Middle East, three nations&#8212;Turkey, Iran, and Saudi Arabia&#8212;see an opportunity to gain the top position in the area. In Latin America, both Brazil and Mexico seek leadership. In East Asia, Japan is trying to recover the position it once held. In South Asia, India remains the major power, but Pakistan refuses to accept this. In sub-Saharan Africa, a struggle for leadership seems to be evolving between Nigeria and South Africa. In Europe, Germany emerges as the strongest country&#8212;a situation that others may contest. In Eastern Europe and Central Asia, Russia is increasingly assertive. The outcome of these contests also will affect the Sino-American competition. In this course, examine these and other issues in the context of current world affairs.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9287  World Politics: A New Cold War--China, the U.S., Russia?  (0 Credits)  
Is world politics entering a new era of conflict&#8212;a new cold war? Recently, the foreign policies of both China and Russia have been more assertive in rhetoric and action. China&#8217;s approach to the East Asian islands, its tensions with neighbors like Japan, and its declaration of a coastal air defense zone suggest that China may want to create a Monroe Doctrine in East Asia. Will this bring conflict with the United States and its allies, like Taiwan, the Philippines, and South Korea? Meanwhile, Russia&#8217;s actions in Crimea and its policies in Syria and Central Asia are now much more forceful than before. The U.S. has strengthened its military ties with Japan, Eastern Europe, and NATO nations, has enforced sanctions, and is developing new Pacific and Atlantic economic alliances. As China, under its new leader, and Russia, under a more confident Putin, seek to redefine the global balance of power, will America&#8217;s response be too bold, or not bold enough? What will the effect be on nations in the vortex, such as Israel, India, Iran, and Brazil? Will a new cold war affect world economics, military outlays, and politics? Examine these and other critical questions in the context of current world affairs.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9288  World Politics--An Age of Transition?  (0 Credits)  
<p>Recent developments in world politics and economics suggest that we are entering a period of considerable uncertainty and disorder&mdash;rising tensions between the United States and Russia, potential conflicts with China, confusion in the Middle East, fundamentalist ideologies, weapons proliferation, slow economic growth in the Western world, etc. Yet, many positive features are also emerging&mdash;economic success in Asia, democratic stability in major areas (India, Indonesia, Latin America), progress in parts of Africa, big advances in literacy and communications, and new energy sources, among others. Are these contrasting features symbolic of a time of transition? Will destructive or creative impulses&mdash;revolution or renewal&mdash;dominate the next decade? How will this affect the global balance of power? Can the U.S. remain number one? Will the Chinese challenge fade or flourish? Will the Middle East explode as Sunni/Shia and Arab/non-Arab conflicts rise? What is the future of Israel? Who will be winners and losers as this age of uncertainty unfolds? This course examines these and other key questions in the context of current world affairs.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9289  World Politics: Modernization and Revolution  (2 Credits)  
<p>Modernization, driven by the Internet; mobile electronics; and television influence societies everywhere. This electronic empowerment is likely to have an especially dramatic influence on non-Western nations. Explore what the revolutionary political and economic impacts are as modern technologies advance, and examine whether or not the spread of military modernization will cause more violence within&ndash;&ndash;and between&ndash;&ndash;countries. Was the Arab Spring an early sign of such upheavals and are there more to come in the region? Will African, Latin American, and Asian peoples revolt or adapt? How will the American, Western European, and Japanese global position be affected? Will a more intensely competitive economic environment emerge? Can these technologies reduce poverty, inequality, and environmental problems? Will the outcome be greater international disorder or greater cooperation? How will leaders, including those from the United States, act and react? Examine these and other key questions in the context of current world affairs.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9290  World Politics--The Next Great War: Politics vs. Economics?  (0 Credits)  
In recent times, two major and contradictory trends have emerged in global affairs. On one hand, the world is becoming increasingly integrated economically. Markets, investments, trade, and production flow across borders as never before. Supply chains are transnational. Capital knows no boundaries. Huge economic zones that subsume nations are evolving, including the European zone, the projected TPP and transatlantic zones, the Chinese-sponsored zone, MERCOSUR, the Pacific Alliance, and the ASEAN zone. On the other hand, political differences and tensions between nations are growing&mdash;the West versus Russia and China versus its maritime neighbors (especially Japan), as well as in the Middle East, Latin America, and Africa. Can the contradictions between economic and political trends be reconciled or will they clash and big global conflicts result? Will there be trade wars between economic blocs? Who will be the winners and losers? How will this impact the nations in the vortex such as Israel, South Korea, and Turkey? How will presidential politics affect US policies in 2016? Will the global balance of economic and political power change? How will the outcome shape world politics in the next decade or so? This course focuses on these and other critical issues in the context of current world affairs.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9291  World Politics: Global Power in the 21st Century  (0 Credits)  
As the 21st century begins, major tensions among big powers&mdash;the US, Russia, China, the EU&mdash;have increased as they dispute over the East Pacific, Ukraine, the Middle East, etc. Concurrently, on-the-ground violence and localized conflict have escalated in Africa, the Middle East, and parts of Asia. Older conflicts, such as those in Afghanistan and Iraq, continue, while newer violence escalates, for example in Libya, Yemen, and Syria. Other concerns like nuclear proliferation, the environment, cyber intrusions, terrorism, and refugees increase. Is there a connection between big power relations and localized conflicts? Is economic strength shifting from the West to Asia? Is economic inequality both between and within nations growing as globalization expands? Are all these disturbances signs of a great global transition as a world largely designed at the end of WWII transforms into a new 21st-century one? Are there positive features, such as international action, conflict resolution, economic improvement, global literacy, and education, that can help shape the outcome? Can the United Nations evolve into an effective agent of international cooperation? Will big power rivalries increase or decline? Can they join together in helping create a new global order? Who will be the winners and the losers? This course examines these and other key questions in the context of current world affairs.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9292  World Politics: New Leadership and Global Power  (0 Credits)  
The coming year will be an unusual period of change and challenge in international political leadership&mdash;the United States will have a new president, China will select a new group of top government leaders, major adjustments in leadership of the European Union are likely, Putin&rsquo;s position will be under intense stress from growing economic and political pressures, and changes to Brazil&rsquo;s leadership are probable considering the current turmoil. In addition, leadership changes can be expected in key Middle Eastern and African countries. There already are new leaders in Canada and Australia, as well as in several nations in the Asia-Pacific (i.e., South Korea, Vietnam, the Philippines, and Taiwan). In South Asia, fresh state and local leaders are confronting existing office-holders. There also will be a new secretary general of the UN. New leaders inevitably bring different policies, objectives, and approaches. How will these changes affect international politics and the global agenda? Will there be significant transformations in the policies and objectives of major nations? What will be the impact on global power? Will there be greater international cooperation or confrontation? Who will be the winners and losers? How will all this affect America&rsquo;s position in the world? This course will discuss these and other critical issues in the context of current affairs.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9293  World Politics: The Great Global Transition  (0 Credits)  
International politics and economics are currently in a period of dramatic change. The post-World War II order, lodged in Western political and economic dominance, is collapsing, and a new global agenda is evolving. New powers like China and India are emerging. Others, like Europe, are declining. Disorder in the Middle East is growing, and the energy revolution underway could reduce the influence of petrostates. Issues like climate change, refugees, nuclear proliferation, terrorism, and economic uncertainty have become urgent. The confusion and instability during this time of transition are increasingly evident. What kind of world system will emerge? Can positive trends like the growth of literacy, communications, and civic consciousness offset negative developments? How will changes in the global balance of power affect the United States? What will the impact be on Latin America and Africa? Who will be the winners and losers? Will political rivalries, competition between big powers, and contests between political ideologies increase or abate? Are today&rsquo;s leaders, especially the in-coming American administration, able to shape a new world order? This course will discuss these and other critical questions in the context of current world affairs.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9294  World Politics: A New Era for America and the World?  (0 Credits)  
The world is going through a period of critical political and economic instability. Given the significance of the United States, changes in its foreign policy are of major importance to the world. Consequently, the Trump administration&rsquo;s indicated new approaches could have a critical impact on the global condition and prospect. What are the key elements of the Trump world view? How will they affect security, economic, and environmental policies, as well as relations with other nations? Major states like China, Russia, India, Japan, and European nations also face many challenges&mdash;how are they responding? What will American approaches be to other countries in Asia, Latin America (e.g., Mexico), and Africa&mdash;and to their concerns? Will the new dynamics of the Middle East create more or less crises? What will the US role be in the area, and will there be a reset in relations with Israel? How will the United States and other major nations confront terrorism and deal with humanitarian issues like refugees? Is cyber the new battlefield? As we enter a new era, will the outcome strengthen or weaken America? Will there be more conflict or cooperation in international relations? Who will be the winners and losers? This course will examine these and other KEY questions in the context of current global affairs.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9295  World Politics: Leadership Change and the Global Agenda  (2 Credits)  
World affairs are greatly affected by the policies, personalities, and capacities of leaders&mdash;traditionally, leaders of major nations. Today, however, even leaders of small countries (such as&nbsp;<span style="line-height: 20.8px;">North Korea and Syria)&nbsp;</span>can have an outsized impact on global events. Currently, significant changes are taking place in the leadership of several key states. Already, in the United States, the Trump administration has made remarkable shifts in both policy and how it is conducted. There are new leaders in several European nations (including Britain, France, and Germany). In Latin America and Asia, important states (Mexico, Brazil, and South Korea) have, or will soon have, new leaders. In the Middle East, older systems of government may change because of new pressures. Yet, the leadership of China and Russia remain largely unchanged. Will this balance between newer and long-lasting leaders affect world affairs? As a result, is the world safer or more dangerous? What are the present and potential danger zones and how will newer and older leaders react to them? Will leadership change in major countries enhance or diminish their international position? How will this impact on broader issues, such as climate change, human rights, and refugees? Who will be the winners and losers? This course will discuss these and other critical issues in the context of current international affairs.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9296  World Politics: Crises, Wars, and Cold Wars  (0 Credits)  
The past year has been full of international crises: the Korean crisis, worsening relations between Russia and the United States, problems in Sino-American relations, explosive tensions in the Middle East, Sino-Indian and Indo-Pakistani conflicts, and intra-European issues, among others. Big military buildups are taking place, along with threats and counterthreats. Why is this happening now? Will some or any of these situations erupt into actual physical wars, or are we entering a time of permanent crisis, always on the edge? How dangerous is this and how long can brinkmanship continue? What are the policies/activities of major powers&mdash;the US, Russia, and China&mdash;and what are their responsibilities? Is there any role for the United Nations? How will these crises affect the progress of smaller nations in Africa, Asia, and Latin America? What is the overall impact on the global economy? Are there lessons from earlier Cold War periods, such as the US/Russian relationship and the Cuban Missile Crisis? Can today&rsquo;s leaders manage these tensions? Could recklessness or misjudgments bring disaster or even nuclear war? How will current conflicts and developments affect action on other global urgencies, such as climate change, terrorism, and refugees? This course will discuss these and other questions in the context of current world affairs.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9297  World Politics: Big Powers--Stability vs. Catastrophe  (0 Credits)  
Big powers&mdash;including the United States, China, and Russia&mdash;maintained stability in world politics for about two decades after the end of the Cold War. More recently, however, several major states have become far more aggressive in their international policies (including Russia&rsquo;s activities in Syria, Ukraine, and with cyber programs; China&rsquo;s island policies, Indo-border approaches, and economic outreach; and the United States&rsquo; stepped-up engagements in the Middle East, Asia, and in economic affairs). Other significant powers, like the European Union, Japan, and India, also have become involved in these situations. Important states like Turkey, Saudi Arabia, and Iran are now engaging in increasingly confrontational activities, often with support by and encouragement from, big powers. Is this indicative of a new era in world affairs? Will it result in some catastrophe&mdash;new or expanded conflicts, surrogate wars, or economic instability? How will this impact other nations in the Middle East, Latin America, and Africa? Can the relative stability of the past be restored, or are we on the way to major clashes and conflicts? How will this affect the global prospect as other concerns, like climate change and refugees, require international cooperation? Is there a role for the United Nations? Who is responsible for this situation? Who will be the winners and losers? This course will examine these and other issues in the context of current world affairs.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9298  World Politics: The Struggle for Global Leadership  (2 Credits)  
In the 20th century, more than 200 million people died in political and military conflicts, as big powers struggled for world primacy. Will the 21st century repeat that experience, as powerful nations now contend both directly and indirectly? Today, the US, China, and Russia engage in intense political and economic conflict. They also compete militarily via surrogates&mdash;notably in the Middle East and Asia, but also in Africa and Latin America. In Europe, sinister forces&mdash;some affiliated with big powers&mdash;seek to undermine the existing democratic order and the European Union. Will regional wars in the Middle East grow into large conflicts? How will this affect Israel and pro-Western countries? Will smaller states, like North Korea and Iran, cause major upheavals? What other areas have similar inflammatory conditions? Can positive developments in today&rsquo;s world offset these explosive tendencies? Can common global concerns (environment, refugees, cyber hacktivists, human rights, etc.) eventually bring nations together? Who will be the winners and who will be the losers? This course discusses these and other critical issues in the context of current world affairs.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9299  World Politics: The Coming Rise and Fall of Great Powers  (2 Credits)  
In the past century, there have been three periods in world politics during which the global power structure has undergone major rearrangements: after World Wars I and II and during the Cold War. Each period saw the rise and fall of great states and the emergence of new forces and fresh forms of international competition&mdash;all with fateful consequences for world order. Right now, it appears we are going through another such period, when existing patterns are shaken and the outcome will determine and possibly reshape the global power balance in the coming decades. Central elements of the present shake-up include the rise of China, the American ability to sustain its greatness, the impact of more active Islamic forces, the decline of Europe, Russian prospects, and the potential of some large non-Western states (e.g., India) to assert themselves. The current shake-up is likely to be more complex because unprecedented features will affect the outcome: dynamic new technologies (artificial intelligence, robots, electronic communications, etc.), environmental imperatives, and massive movements of displaced people, among others. Will all this create large instabilities and major conflicts? Are orderly adjustments possible? Can new instruments of power, control, and influence replace old definitions of the strength of nations? Will this affect the position of important but smaller states, like Israel and those in Africa and Latin America? Who will be winners and losers? What sort of world will emerge from this vortex? This course will discuss these and other critical questions in the context of current world events.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9300  Managing Risk and Uncertainty: Assessment, Frameworks, and Strategies  (1 Credit)  
<p>Operating in conditions of uncertainty can be disorienting and bewildering. A risk-informed approach can allow global leaders to make informed decisions, assign priorities and develop comprehensive treatment strategies, as they appreciate and anticipate threats and vulnerabilities, as well as their concomitant probabilities and consequences. Regardless of the particular field (from international security, to world politics, to the global economy, to the planet&rsquo;s changing climate) understanding the fundamentals&mdash;both pro and con&mdash;of risk, its assessment, and treatments is vital to producing robust and resilient strategies.</p><br><br><br><br><p>This one-day intensive course prepares global leaders and professionals to better understand, evaluate, and manage risk no matter what their goals. Explore a number of key risk concepts and frameworks, examine illustrative cases, and develop components of a risk assessment and treatment plan.</p><br><br><br><br><p><strong>COURSE TOPICS</strong></p><br><br><br><br><ul><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Understanding Risk and Uncertainty</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Assessing and Evaluating Risk</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Conducting a Risk Treatment/Management Plan</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Best Practices and Strategies Through Case Studies</li><br><br></ul>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9305  Latin America Today: Achievements and Challenges  (0 Credits)  
While European and North American economies continue to struggle, South America's economy has experienced a sharp economic rebound and remains relatively strong. However, South America's economic growth masks continued uncertainty in other areas--namely socially and politically. The widening gap between the rich and poor, institutional weaknesses, political corruption, and ideological and territorial disputes all challenge South America's emergence as a world power. Examine the potential of this dynamic region, as well as challenges in consolidation of a dynamic economy and robust political environment. Analyze how regional cooperation among key players, such as Brazil, could enhance growth.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9306  Women as Global Actors III: Conflict and Peacebuilding  (0 Credits)  
Explore the role of women in conflict and peacebuilding scenarios, including examples of both global and grassroots efforts in conflict resolution. Topics include how gender-based violence has come to be defined by the international community as a war crime, the work of women¿s groups in post-conflict transitional justice, and women in peacekeeping missions. Students analyze and discuss case studies in the Balkans and other areas, such as the Middle East, former USSR, Central Asia, South Asia, and Africa.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9307  Women in Global Business Leadership  (0 Credits)  
<p>This course traces the trajectory of women entering and occupying prominent roles in the global labor force over the last 50 years and its ongoing challenges. The advancement of women from employees to employers and leaders has extensive impact for the social and economic foundations of a country. In addition to affecting macroeconomic factors such as labor force participation and unemployment rates, women employees also affect the microeconomic concerns of businesses such as talent acquisition, unequal wages, and diversity. This course is designed to assist students in developing an educated viewpoint on the dynamic challenges facing women as they enter and rise to leadership positions in organizations. Students will walk away with real-world examples of how women have reached the top ranks in business and how to apply those skills to their own careers. In addition to an enlightened outlook and a practical skill set, students will be able to articulate potential issues and outline prospective strategies that can remedy the specific challenges faced by this untapped talent pool.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9310  Economic Advancement in the Middle East: A Global Priority  (0 Credits)  
Given the severe economic and political challenges facing countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), and their implications for global peace and security, economic development in this region is a matter of urgency. The Arab Spring raised expectations that for many were soon dashed&mdash;owing to civil conflicts, poor economic management, and a sluggish external economy. With growth weak, youth unemployment high, and budgets stretched, oil-importing countries need policies that spur growth and create jobs&mdash;and the financial support of the international community. The oil-exporting countries need to diversify their economies away from reliance on oil and heavy public spending. But before any meaningful reform can take root, countries in the region need political and social stability.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9311  Critical Issues  (0 Credits)  
Join the NYU School of Professional Studies Center for Global Affairs in an examination of critical issues with global repercussions. This daylong seminar features four experts who, in lectures of 75 minutes each, probe the ramifications and contours of today&rsquo;s most important topics. Each semester&rsquo;s selection of topics reflects the most pertinent issues. This spring&rsquo;s topic will be media and disinformation in global affairs.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9312  Foreign Policy in the Age of Social Media  (0 Credits)  
Governments, political activists, grassroots citizen movements, and transnational groups now rely on social media, text messaging, satellite television, and other new communication platforms for strategic communication and diplomacy. Examine the role and implications of new media in shaping world affairs. Use contemporary case studies, including Arab-Muslim political movements, dissident voices in China, and other examples, to explore how social and other new media play a central role in advancing, blocking, and managing political change.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9313  U.S. Foreign Policy in the Middle East  (0 Credits)  
The Middle East has remained the most strategically significant area for the United States since the end of World War II. Explore current U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East, and examine the extent to which U.S. policy is being reassessed in the wake of the Arab Spring and the impact that might have on U.S. allies in the region. Topics covered include U.S. policy toward the Israeli-Palestinian peace negotiations, the destructive civil war in Syria, the interim deal with Iran and the prospects for a long-term solution, the evolving U.S. relationship with the Gulf States (particularly Saudi Arabia), the fractious political nature of Egypt, U.S. bilateral relations with Turkey in the wake of its growing authoritarian rule, and the withdrawal of combat forces from Afghanistan.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9315  The Power of Words: Lessons in Foreign Policy Communication  (0 Credits)  
Savvy strategic communication is a critical element of successful foreign policy in the global media environment. Examine events, from the Cold War through the Arab Awakening, to better understand the relationship between policy, public opinion, and "messaging." How do governments, media, and activists engage and influence global publics? How are audiences and tactics determined? What defines success? Engage in practical exercises by assuming a variety of roles in order to understand historical and contemporary global communication, and to develop skills relevant to opportunities in foreign affairs, public relations, media, and marketing.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9316  Public Policy Fundamentals  (2 Credits)  
Examine the basic principles of government and political science, as well as the role of public policy, in shaping our work, culture, and society. Political discourse and debate touch our everyday lives, from social welfare programs and infrastructure to advanced R&amp;D and international trade. Evaluate policymaking through contemporary political issues, including a review of local, national, and international case studies. Through practical exercises, develop fundamental skills such as cost-benefit evaluations and the ability to craft policy briefs and recommendation memos.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9324  Energy and the World: Politics, Markets, and Technology  (0 Credits)  
<p>From the peak oil prices in mid-2014 of $100 and more per barrel to their crash to less than half of those price levels by early 2015, energy has remained a predominant focus of attention among leading governments, corporations, and investors worldwide. Examine how persistently shifting corporate and national governance standards have continued to redefine the rules of the game. As the class explores the economic, political, and security issues surrounding energy development, group discussion draws from case studies of new technologies that have reshaped the oil, gas, and electricity markets. Analysis includes consideration of the leading producer and consumer states, as well as the interaction with emerging competitors.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9325  The Evolution of Middle East Energy: Innovation, Economics, and Security  (0 Credits)  
<p>Following several years of relative stability in oil markets, crude prices were cut in half in late 2014. The dramatic growth of new energy production in North America and changing global demand has led to the prospects for a seismic impact on the Persian Gulf region given the historic effect of oil and gas in these national economies. With commodities trading remaining an important connection between the United States and the region, political ties have begun to adjust with the potential for new opportunities and challenges. Gain an introductory overview of the changing market models, technological innovations, and security considerations.&nbsp;</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9326  International Criminal Law and Human Rights  (2 Credits)  
<p>Gain a critical introduction to international criminal justice and examine the sources, systems, and foundations of international criminal law. Explore the role of international criminal law in promoting and protecting human rights; the legal value and authority of declarations, treaties, decisions, and judgments; and the interaction between law and politics, with particular focus on international criminal prosecutions at the International Criminal Court (ICC) and various tribunals. Analyze how international criminal law fits into the broader discourse of human rights.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>COURSE TOPICS:</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><ul><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Origins of International Criminal Justice</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>International Criminal Violations: Genocide, Crimes Against Humanity, War Crimes and the Crime of Aggression</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>The Emergence of International Criminal Tribunals</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Hybrid Criminal Tribunals</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>The Development of the International Criminal Court</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Alternatives to International Criminal Justice and the Future of International Criminal Law</li><br><br></ul><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>This course is eligible towards the completion of the <a href="https://www.sps.nyu.edu/professional-pathways/certificates/global-affairs-and-fundraising/global-affairs.html">Certificate in Global Affairs</a>. Bundle your coursework and earn a professional credential that communicates knowledge and skills gained. Declared Certificate students receive 10% off of courses within the program.&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9328  The National and International Security Implications of Climate Change  (0 Credits)  
Climate change is a pressing topic that has clear implications for environmental sustainability and international development. Examine questions related to this timely issue. How could climate change affect security? What are the implications of climate change for U.S. national security? What are its implications for international peace and security? What does climate change mean for countries' territorial integrity? Participants also explore the international implications of these questions in relation to how climate change is handled.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9329  Global Corporate Social Responsibility  (0 Credits)  
Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is fast becoming a lens through which businesses are evaluated. Today&rsquo;s leading organizations understand that, to be truly sustainable, CSR must become core to business strategy. Explore the driving forces behind CSR, ways that companies incorporate it into their growth strategies, and the risks of falling behind. Learn about how companies&rsquo; views of CSR have shifted from compliance and philanthropy to efficiency and growth opportunities. Understand the importance of capturing new types of data and insight and engaging new types of stakeholders.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9332  Building Sustainable Technology Through Microfinance  (0 Credits)  
Learn how microfinance and sustainable technology are driving forces behind many recent advances in international economic development. Today, poor communities around the world are using finance models and community development lessons learned from microfinance to introduce improvements such as ecofriendly housing and wastewater treatment facilities, into their communities. Examine case studies from Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America to discern why certain financial and technological collaborations have been successful while others have floundered. Explore how public-private partnerships, philanthropists, and businesses can use these lessons to better access and serve local and developing regional economies.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9336  The Social Capital Market: Philanthropic/Investment Hybrids for Social Impact  (0 Credits)  
The effective combination of philanthropy and investment has become an essential part of addressing global challenges such as poverty, climate change, and housing. Acquire a comprehensive overview of social investing strategies which blend economic returns with social and environmental benefits. Analyze specific transactions and partnerships to better understand the tactics social entrepreneurs use to achieve their goals. Case studies highlight microfinance, education, and the environment. Speakers include philanthropic investors and social entrepreneurs.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9340  Women in Global Business Leadership  (0 Credits)  
This course traces the trajectory of women entering and occupying prominent roles in the global labor force over the last 50 years and explores the ongoing challenges. The advancement of women from employees to employers and leaders has extensive impact for the social and economic foundations of a country. In addition to affecting macroeconomic factors such as labor force participation and unemployment rates, women employees also affect the microeconomic concerns of businesses such as talent acquisition, unequal wages, and diversity.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9350  Workshop in Applied Peacebuilding  (0 Credits)  
<p>This practice-oriented course provides an overview of the <br><br>evolving, professional field of peacebuilding as well as a critical <br><br>review of approaches to working in conflict environments. Students will be required to develop an international peacebuilding<br><br> project with the intention of implementing it as a summer internship.<br><br> The instructor will assist students in identifying appropriate <br><br>internships with international organizations and NGOs. Students <br><br>returning to the MSGA program in the fall will have the opportunity to<br><br> report to the CGA community about their field experience. </p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9351  The Ethics of the Use of Force: War in the 21st Century  (0 Credits)  
Two millennia ago, Cicero stated, "In time of war, the laws are silent." Military theorist Carl von Clausewitz suggested that "war is the continuation of policy by other means," but also acknowledged that war has its limits. How does this apply to waging war today? Examine when&#8211;or whether&#8211;it is just to wage war, how the actions of participants in armed conflicts&#8211;whether civilian or military&#8211;are regulated by international law, and what happens when these laws are violated. Discuss the ethics of war, nuclear weapons, and recent debates spurred by the Bush Doctrine on preventative versus preemptive war.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9352  The Chosen Few: The International Refugee Framework and Refugee Resettlement  (0 Credits)  
Who deserves the protection of refugee status and what does this protection include? Survey the root causes of displacement and the response to refugees, including the provision of temporary asylum, third country resettlement, and other durable solutions. Examine the resources for, and the obstacles facing, threatened populations who seek international recognition and protection, including legal frameworks, organizational assets, and national political considerations. Explore cases that demonstrate the exceptions and the norms of the field from the perspectives of institutional political actors, activists, advocates and service providers. Understand U.S. policies and efforts to provide refugee resettlement and asylum protection. <br><br>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9371  Social Movements in Latin America  (0 Credits)  
Learn about some of the most important social movements in Latin America since the 1990s and their relationship to broader political and economic developments. Study the wave of social movement that, during the last decades, has challenged the neoliberal economic policies implemented in the region during the 1980s and 1990s. Gain a foundation in social movement theory. By the end of the course, be able to answer the following questions: What is a social movement? Are social movements different from collective behaviors? If so, how? Why do people decide to join social movements? Why do social movements arise in a specific time and place? Does leadership play a role in the formation of social movements? Do social movements learn from the history of other movements? Also, explore these theories through some of the most salient social movements that have emerged in Latin America during the previous two decades. Based on this historical background, you will be able to understand how social movements in Latin America have reshaped the local, regional, and political dynamics of the region. Case studies will include the rise of popular support for Evo Morales in Bolivia, horizontalism in Argentina, and the Zapatista movement in Mexico.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9400  The IMF, WTO, and World Bank: Can They Revive Global Cooperation?  (0 Credits)  
Global economic cooperation has waned in recent years and the Bretton Woods Institutions created after World War II&mdash;the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, and World Trade Organization&mdash;are being challenged by regional agreements, alternative economic ideologies, and nationalist policies. This course will clarify the differences between the IMF, World Bank, and WTO and how each seeks to advance global prosperity; discuss how these international institutions have evolved and shaped the global economy; and assess the implications of declining multilateral economic cooperation for their future. It will emphasize the current world trade<br /><br><br>frictions&mdash;especially between the US and China&mdash;and their importance for future global prospects. The course will conclude by discussing if and how the IMF, World Bank, and WTO can help revive international economic cooperation to promote stronger, sustainable, and equitable economic growth.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9411  Global Financial Markets and Central Banks  (0 Credits)  
Examine how global markets have become more interrelated and how the international community adjusts to financial shocks. Explore current events through the lens of the Great Depression, the Japanese real estate bubble, the Asia currency crisis, the NASDAQ crash, the housing crisis, and the alphabet soup (CDO, ABX). We discuss Greenspan's conundrum, when excess liquidity was created despite 17 increases in the Fed funds' rate and Bernanke's new world of liquidity trap and rising sovereign risk following massive expansionary policies. Students hone their ability to separate out noise, theory, and opinion and gain a better understanding of the global financial market.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9413  Democracy, Development, and the Environment: The Human Rights Debate in India and China  (0 Credits)  
Examine continuity and change in key human rights issues through the perspective of two rising powers on the global stage: India and China. As India developed from a colonial to a post-colonial state and China shifted from a Maoist to a market-socialist state, various human rights have changed in contemporary times. Examine political rights (free press, political participation, and the right to protest), economic rights and development (education and poverty debates), and third-generation rights (women, minorities, environment, and resources).
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9414  Emerging Markets in the Global Economy  (0 Credits)  
Emerging Market Economies have been the darlings of global markets experiencing phenomenal&nbsp;&nbsp;growth but also financial meltdowns. Why have some shown resilience, agility, and ability to adapt while others are becoming mired in stagnation, pollution, and bureaucracy? Examine the role of economic models, resource management, corruption, social inequalities, and demographic migrations that characterize many of these economies. Identify the risks and strengths of BRICS, the Latin American&nbsp;PUMAs, and Asian Tiger Economies.&nbsp;Can these countries challenge multilateral organizations and succeed? Topics include governance, trade, market optimization, pollution, and urbanization.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9415  Pakistan: A Case Study in Geopolitics and Security  (0 Credits)  
Grasp the on-the-ground realities in Pakistan that affect the geopolitical and international security environment. Topics include the role religion plays in Pakistan; international security concerns; how non-state actors--including Taliban forces--influence policy; the military's role in Pakistan's civil and political affairs; why democracy hasn't succeeded in the country; the nature of Pakistan's relations with the geopolitical and economic powers of today--namely India, China, and Afghanistan; and the consequences instability and conflict in Pakistan could potentially have on global security.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9416  India in Transition  (0 Credits)  
India&rsquo;s role on the world stage has grown significantly in recent years. Examine the key issues and sociocultural forces related to the development of contemporary India. Explore the changing nature of politics in India since 1947, and examine how the 2014 election of Narendra Modi represented a new era of politics and governance. Gain insights into India&rsquo;s economic reforms, the impact of globalization and foreign investment, and the economic opportunities and challenges facing the country. Understand India&rsquo;s foreign policy priorities and the geopolitical implications that India faces as a regional and emerging global power.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9417  The Cost of Food in the Developing and Developed World  (0 Credits)  
Explore international food policy and hunger and gain critical insights into the regions of the world most impacted by this crisis. Topics include domestic food policy, energy, trade, and how experiences differ for populations in developed and developing countries. Learn what constitutes a food crisis and the roles of international organizations, sovereign governments, and civil society in ensuring food security. Case studies include agricultural subsidies in the United States, domestic food policies in Latin America, the land grab in Africa, and export bans in Asia.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9418  Resource Conflicts in the Developing World  (0 Credits)  
Developing countries with little to no government regulation have become paramount global sources of raw materials. Bound by the fact that their gross national product is reliant upon extraction, state officials are limited in their ability to negotiate on behalf of their constituents. In turn, tensions between sustainability and development are born, resulting in conflict and violent internal struggles. Analyze the ethics of exploitation and effects of resource extraction in the developing world by exploring case studies in Iran, Nigeria, and Ecuador. Examine contemporary and historical perspectives on international environmental policy, the human rights of indigenous populations, and special interest stakeholders, along with other important and relevant issues.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9419  From Third World to First: The Singapore Experience  (0 Credits)  
How can policies overcome obstacles and allow a country to remain competitive and relevant in a turbulent global economy? Study the rebranding of Singapore and its transition from a small port&#8212;first to a manufacturing center and then to a global financial center. The course culminates with the challenges Singapore faces today to deregulate and liberalize the economy and to create a new country that emphasizes innovation, creativity, and entrepreneurship. Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of Singapore&#8217;s macroeconomic and regulatory policies, and glean what lessons, if any, they hold for a country such as China.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9420  Resource Wars: The Realities and Real Costs of Natural Resource Exploitation,  (0 Credits)  
Developing countries with little or no government regulations have become a prime global source of raw materials such as minerals, petroleum, and forest products. Examine the far-reaching impact of resource extraction in the developing world with a special focus on case studies in Iran, Nigeria, and Ecuador. Issues include international environmental policy, the human rights of indigenous local populations, corporate protocol, and industry standards, as well as NGO/civil society and special interest stakeholders. Explore the realities of political and corporate will over limited resources and how tensions between development and sustainability develop into conflict and/or violent internal struggles.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9421  The Development and Finance of Carbon Markets  (0 Credits)  
Analyze the most dynamic new markets in global finance&#8211;those that trade credits for the reduction of carbon and other greenhouse gas emissions and channel capital to viable projects addressing climate change. Topics include the mechanics of the regulated and voluntary markets, the politics of the 1997 Kyoto Protocol and negotiations for a post-2012 framework, the pioneering efforts of the European Union Emission Trading Scheme, the consequences of the absence of U.S. leadership, and the arguments for a carbon tax versus mandated "cap and trade" systems, such as those being implemented regionally in the United States.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9422  Emerging Latin American Puma Economies  (0 Credits)  
The new darlings of global financial markets are the four ascending economies of Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Peru. What are the political and economic philosophies that they share, and how have they affected their development? How have these countries diversified their economies beyond commodity wealth, and what have they been doing to invest in alternative, sustainable economic engines? Are these four countries positioned to achieve Asian Tiger-style potential, and what have they done to avoid sluggish growth, infrastructure decline, weakening institutions, and political strife? Examine the newly formed Pacific Alliance comprised of these &#8220;Puma Economies,&#8221; and explore how they are moving beyond trade into integration of economic and political structures.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9423  China and America: A Global Power Struggle  (1 Credit)  
<p>For better or worse, China is America&rsquo;s most important peer, keenest friend, and most dangerous enemy, as well as the only country that truly jeopardizes American hegemony. China&rsquo;s ambitions in Asia threaten American interests far more than Putin&rsquo;s Russia do in Europe. Meanwhile, major American companies like Apple, Tesla, and Wal-Mart can overlook Russia with 146 million people and a stagnating economy, but they all believe they need China&rsquo;s market of 1.4 billion to thrive. In 2021, United States trade with Russia was an anemic $36 billion, less than half of US trade with the Netherlands. Trade with China, however, was $656 billion. Is it a new cold war, a cyber war, a new &ldquo;great game&rdquo; for the 21st century? Are we in a &lsquo;pre-war&rsquo; period, between World War 2 and World War 3? If not, what is it? And how did we get to where we are today? This course will explore the messy new reality of competition between the United States and China, from fights over the coronavirus to trade tensions to Beijing&rsquo;s censorship of Hollywood films to the battle for tech dominance. It will seek to address the two questions of our time: What does China&rsquo;s rise mean for the United States? And how should the US respond?</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9425  Microfinance and Social Entrepreneurship  (0 Credits)  
Since 1976, when Muhammed Yunus first gave group-based loans to women in Bangladesh, microfinance has successfully demonstrated how social entrepreneurs can break down the boundaries between philanthropy and investment. Examine key concepts in the evolution of the microfinance movement and the important role played by social entrepreneurs. Case studies illustrate how social entrepreneurs from around the world are using market principles and forces to tackle critical social and environmental problems.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9426  How Global Finance Really Works  (0 Credits)  
Financial terminology can be challenging to decipher, but it is critical to understanding how global markets interact. The interpretations of economic analysts vary depending on their country of origin, media affiliation, and personal biases. This course provides the basic knowledge needed to understand the issues and implications of financial and economic news reports. Topics include a general overview of the global financial system, the roles of different financial institutions and their functions, the interrelationships between these institutions, the different financial markets, the role and impact of interest rates, and the interpretation of various metrics of financial indicators.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9428  Election 2020: The Policy, Polls, and Messaging Dynamic  (1 Credit)  
<p>The 2020 US presidential election will determine not only national leadership for the next four years, but the future direction of the American political system. The course will address emerging policies and campaign strategies as factors that shape public opinion and control the narrative. We&rsquo;ll focus on the issues, data, and tactics that will determine the outcome&mdash;policy positions, demographics, polling and targeting, messaging, voter &ldquo;expansion&rdquo; and suppression, traditional and social media, and debates, among other equities. We&rsquo;ll consider the impact of the presidential election on Senate and congressional contests. We&rsquo;ll look at the global pandemic, race, and foreign affairs as specific case studies to understand better the emerging process in real time, from both the domestic and global perspectives. Finally, we&rsquo;ll evaluate the implications of the outcome.<br /><br><br><br /><br><br>Please note that class will be held on Columbus Day. If you are unable to attend, the session will be recorded.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9429  Making Sense of the Global Markets  (0 Credits)  
As global markets become even more interrelated, the bond market remains the heart of the financial system. Why are there so many different interest rates in the world? How do changes in the economy, market structure, and various government policies affect the bond market? How do the bond and stock markets interact with the three Cs: currencies, commodities, and China? We also study the Sovereign Wealth Fund and sovereignty. Students hone their ability to separate out noise, theory, and opinion from today's financial market news and gain a better understanding of the current state of the global financial market.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9430  Russia in Transition  (0 Credits)  
<p>Since returning to the presidency in 2012, Vladimir Putin has chartered a dramatically different course for Russia. Examine the roots of today&rsquo;s resurgent and nationalistic Russia by tracking developments since the breakup of the Soviet Union. Explore how Russia&rsquo;s experiment with democracy has given away to an increasingly authoritarian state. In light of recent events in Ukraine, analyze the prospects for relations between Russia and the West&mdash;and discover to what extent Russia&rsquo;s Asia pivot is realistic. Topics also include Russia&rsquo;s state capitalism and the dominant role that the energy sector plays in the economy, foreign trade, and foreign policy.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9431  The Middle East  (0 Credits)  
Revolutions and reforms are sweeping the Middle East and North Africa, causing historic transformation in the Arab world. Analyze the significance of these events and their social and political origins in Tunisia, Egypt, Syria, Yemen, Bahrain, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, Iraq, and Libya, among others. What role can current Arab regimes play in facilitating peaceful transitions, and how should the U.S. and the EU secure their national strategic interests while encouraging socio-political and economic reforms? Finally, as tensions continue to escalate between Israel and Hamas and Hezbollah, will we face another major violent conflict, and could it engulf other Arab states?
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9432  Foreign Affairs in Real Time: Global Media and Political Change  (0 Credits)  
Citizen movements for democratic political rights in regions including the Middle East and China have been attributed to the increasing availability of global information through social media, satellite television, and radio. Examine the role of global media in political change, as well as its tactical use by governments, using weekly current events as "texts." Resources on the theory, history, and practice of political communication--and empirical data from sources such as the Pew Global Attitudes Project and the InterMedia research consultancy--provide context for class discussions.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9433  The Nuclear World: Alternative Energies and Proliferation in an Era of Climate Change  (0 Credits)  
Global energy consumption is expected to increase 160 percent by 2050, while concerns over climate change grow worldwide. Analyze the global implications of nuclear power and other alternative energies. With the Obama administration offering $8 billion to build new power plants in the United States, does a danger of nuclear catastrophes (like those in Japan, Three Mile Island, and Chernobyl) loom on the horizon? Examine the strides being made to create environmentally safe energy and explore whether nuclear power is the answer for abundant energy in the developed and developing world.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9434  Latin America: Challenges, Threats, and Critical Opportunities  (0 Credits)  
Examine development and political trends in modern Latin America. Compare how various Latin American countries have managed economic growth, political governance, military coups, and financial crises. Will Latin America seize its golden opportunity to become a major resource provider to the engines of Asia&#8212;and how can those trade benefits be maximized for development and stability? Discuss challenges such as extreme economic inequalities, illiberal democracies, human migration in the Americas, the critical role of natural resource management, and relations with the rest of the world. Topics include governance, economics, political models, institutions, trade, and social trends.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9435  Revolutionary Iran: Politics, Protest, and Islam  (0 Credits)  
In the shifting political landscape of the Middle East, Iran stands to increase its regional power while its Islamic authoritarian regime challenges United States security interests and remains in power despite a vivid opposition movement. Explore the most recent developments in Iran in the context of the changing Middle East. Discussion includes the origins of modern Iran starting with the constitutional revolution in 1905 and the Islamic Revolution of 1979. What was "Islamic" about the Islamic revolution? How can we explain the role of Islam for social and political change in Iran's past, present, and future?
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9436  Civil Society Organizations  (0 Credits)  
The scope and impact of civil society organizations (CSOs) have grown significantly in the past 20 years as the information revolution has enhanced the effectiveness of such organizations across national borders and increased their responsiveness to a broad range of economic, social, and humanitarian issues. Examine the role and reach of CSOs in today's world, including the evolution of the term "civil society" to encompass transnational advocacy groups, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), foundations, think tanks, and microcredit entities. Analyze key "issue areas" in which CSOs are significant actors, including international humanitarian law (the Geneva Conventions), environment, the campaign to ban landmines, and microcredit initiatives.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9437  From the Rule of the Gun to the Rule of Law: International Legal and Security Sector Development.  (0 Credits)  
Analyze challenges facing states that are emerging from armed conflict or other major political upheavals while legal order, security structures, and institutions of law are being reestablished or developed. Cases of extremis--where a state is either unable or unwilling to follow international legal norms--are also examined. Explore the range of tools available to policymakers attempting to bolster fragile state institutions or enforce minimal legal obligations through foreign assistance, United Nations peacekeeping operations or multilateral sanctions, and accountability mechanisms--including international tribunals. Case studies form the basis for debate on situations ranging from Afghanistan to the Congo.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9438  Transitional Justice and Lessons Learned: Africa and Latin America  (0 Credits)  
Analyze the legal and sociopolitical questions arising from the systematic violations of human rights within the context of postconflict reconciliation in Latin America and Africa, and examine how such issues relate to the practice of transitional justice. Topics include models of redress, conflict resolution mechanisms and methods of peace building, and comparative analysis of government strategies to build democracy and the rule of law. Additional analysis focuses on local and international responses to conflict, including the role of the United Nations, international courts and truth commissions, amnesties, reparations, institutional reforms, and reconciliation programs.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9440  The Social Capital Market: Philanthropic/Investment Hybrids for Social Impact  (0 Credits)  
The effective combination of philanthropy and investment has become an essential part of addressing global changes such as poverty, climate change, and housing. This seminar provides an overview of social investing strategies which blend economic returns with social and environmental benefits. We analyze specific transactions and partnerships to better understand the tactics social entrepreneurs use to achieve their missions. Case studies will come from microfinance, education, and the environment. Speakers include philanthropic investors along with social entrepreneurs.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9441  Cuba After Fidel: Economic Reform, Political Liberalization, and Foreign Relations  (0 Credits)  
Discuss the main changes in Cuba&rsquo;s economy, domestic politics, and foreign relations of the last decade and a half. Examine the processes of economic reform and political liberalization in Cuba after Ra&uacute;l Castro&rsquo;s rise to the presidency in 2006 and the approval of the economic and social guidelines of the VI Congress of the CCP in 2011. Discuss the reasons and politics that led to the specific project of reform adopted by the government, and examine how it has succeeded or failed in different areas of Cuba&rsquo;s economic, political, and social life. Analyze the process of rapprochement with the United States under Barack Obama&rsquo;s presidency and the general effects of the US-Cuba d&eacute;tente and the domestic processes of economic reform and political liberalization on Cuba&rsquo;s role in the world. Consider the improvement of Cuba&rsquo;s relations with American allies (Canada, European Union) and strategic rivals (Russia and China). The class ends with a discussion about the rise of Miguel Diaz-Canel to the presidency and the expectations of economic and political changes in his presidential term.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9442  The United States and the United Nations: A Saga of Mixed Messages  (0 Credits)  
The United States played a pivotal role in the establishment of the United Nations and, for two decades or so, remained one of its most outspoken advocates. Since the mid-1970s, however, relations between the UN and its host country have been fraught with tensions and have fallen onto a dizzying rollercoaster track. In the latest development, after eight years of relatively friction-free cooperation under President Obama&rsquo;s administration, President Trump has signaled yet another era of tension and estrangement. Against this background, this course seeks to identify the systemic, ideological, and political (internal and external) factors accounting for and explaining the Trump administration&rsquo;s stance toward the evolving security, human rights, humanitarian, and development agendas of the United Nations and the organization as whole. Topics to be covered include an examination of the making of the UN Charter, the role of the presidency and congress in the formation of US policy toward the UN, and the significance of the changing structure of international society and growing salience of global threats.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9443  Cleantech, Renewables, and Alternative Energy Finance  (3 Credits)  
Explore the models, financing vehicles, and investment opportunities for alternative energy sources such as solar, wind, nuclear, electrical storage, and geothermal. Learn how these technologies integrate into the current power supply structure. Discover other innovative alternative energy sources&rsquo; potential and their financing mechanisms. Also, gain a greater understanding of the roles and impacts that these technologies are having on the energy sector, the different financing options for renewables, and the market impacts of increasing use of alternative fuels in the future. The different regulatory and policy matters affecting alternative energy will be studied and incorporated into modeling and written analysis. As a student in this course, you will attend events and presentations put on by members of the cleantech community in the region. Practical exercises in financial modeling (project finance and corporate analysis) specific to the alternative energy sector will be performed to utilize different analysis tools. You will be provided market data and information on one or more sectors of the energy market and be required to deliver a comprehensive analysis and forecast of relevant energy market trends, prices, and insight.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9444  The Muslim Ban and Refugee Crisis in a Historical Perspective  (1 Credit)  
This course will trace how the intertwined histories of the Middle East and United States set the stage for the contemporary moment. We will begin by examining the 19th-century origins of some of the first instances of modern ethnic cleansing in the Middle East&mdash;the Armenian Genocide and Greek-Turkish population exchanges&mdash;and delve into how these humanitarian disasters shaped conceptions of Islam in the United States. We then will study the creation of the US immigration and deportation system, its history of systemic religious and racial discrimination, and its relationship to the global regime of passports and borders. We will end the course by looking at how the bloody state response to the 2011 revolution in Syria and the lingering aftereffects of US policy in Iraq generated a wave of refugees, just as 19th-century legal precedent and deeply engrained stereotypes led to their exclusion.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9450  World Politics: Global Leadership and Regional Conflicts  (0 Credits)  
<p>In several areas of the world today, there are important conflicts between local powers for regional leadership. The collective outcomes will define world politics for the next decade and beyond. Rivalries and contests are currently most evident in the Middle East (Saudi Arabia and Iran engaging in proxy wars) and in South Asia (India and Pakistan continuing fierce competition/nuclear standoff). In East Asia, China and Japan contend over islands, but this is only part of an old struggle for regional leadership. In Europe, old conflict finds new expression as the two strongest states and leaders (Germany/Merkel and Russia/Putin) are in a showdown on the East-West divide. The future of Latin America may be seriously affected by rivalry between Brazil and Mexico, each leading increasingly competitive economic groups (Mercosur versus the Pacific Alliance). In Africa, Nigeria and South Africa are potential rivals for leadership. As these&mdash;and similar situations elsewhere&mdash;evolve, will they be resolved by diplomacy or confrontation? Could they expand into larger wars? Will the United States and other major players choose sides or mediate? How will it affect the U.S. role in the world and in global leadership? Can the United Nations be useful? Will nongovernment groups, such as terrorists, be involved? Is a new international landscape, accompanied by a new balance of power, emerging? This course discusses these and other issues in the context of current world affairs.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9510  Brand America 2016: The US Presidential Election and Global Opinion  (0 Credits)  
The evolving US leadership role in the world is the central foreign policy question of the 2016 presidential election, both within the respective parties during the nominating season and in the general election. This course will consider candidates&rsquo; stances on current global issues&mdash;nonstate terrorism, instability in the Middle East, Syria, immigration, climate change, refugees, the Iran deal, and trade&mdash;as they respond to real-time events and in historical perspective. We also will address global opinion on the election as a backdrop to candidate positions and as a means to understanding policy expectations for the new administration: How does the US political system project its vision for world affairs to domestic and foreign audiences?
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9511  Global Social Movements and Civil Society  (0 Credits)  
The emergence of a global civil society is one of the most significant developments in contemporary international politics. From combating poverty and disease to promoting human rights and environmental protection, civil society actors have become a third force in global politics. Yet the politics of exactly who and what constitutes &ldquo;global civil society&rdquo; are complex. Are global civil society entities sovereign agencies or structural outcomes of neoliberal globalization? How &ldquo;global&rdquo; is global civil society? Are these organized INGOs with transnational networks and operations or are they grassroots movements that are organizing through online social networks? In this course, we will explore how transnational networks are established, who supports them, and how they operate. More important, we will look at how global civil society has transformed the way that we understand and address international problems.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9520  Food and Water Security: Tools for Sustainable Solutions  (0 Credits)  
After nearly a decade of rising food prices, nearly one billion people in the world are hungry, and one billion people lack access to safe water supplies. Amidst these current-day realities, are there sustainable ways to improve global food and water security? Examine international and local food, water, and sanitation policies, programs and projects. Analyze the differing scenarios in developed and developing countries, as well as the roles of international organizations, sovereign governments, and civil society in ensuring food and water security through policy creation and implementation. Case studies include agricultural subsidies in the United States; domestic food policies in the US, Latin America, and Africa; hydraulic fracturing in the US; the land grab and drought in Africa; and export bans in Asia. We also will look at a few models of sustainable approaches to global food and water security.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9521  Seeking Cybersecurity: Exploring Crime, Terrorism, Espionage, and the Use of Weapons in Cyberspace  (0 Credits)  
The exponential expansion of computer technologies and the Internet has&nbsp;spawned a variety of new criminal behaviors and provided criminals with a new environment in which to operate. Cybercrime knows no physical geographic boundaries, as the Internet provides criminals with access to people, institutions, and businesses around the globe. The reach of the threat defies conventional notions of jurisdiction of sovereign nations, thus making the targeting of cybercriminals particularly challenging for authorities worldwide. This course seeks to enter into the complex world of cybercrime by exploring its evolution and by critically evaluating the international and domestic measures enacted to fight it. During this course, gain a basic understanding of cyberlaw and cybercrime investigation techniques; explore issues related to cyberliberties and examine the relationship between these rights and cybersecurity; and analyze global policies to combat cyberterrorism. During a final scenarios exercise, assume the role of a cybersecurity investigator and present your findings and recommendations to the group.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9540  The 21st Century: Age of the Pacific  (0 Credits)  
<p>Examine evolving trade relations with an emphasis on divergent economic development models, governance issues, demographic challenges, and resource management.&nbsp;Explore the security issues that relate to trade and development in the Pacific Rim region and analyze whether this region will become a viable power bloc&nbsp;or whether it will simply become&nbsp;a new battleground for rising powers.&nbsp;Analyze the future of APEC and how it could&nbsp;define the region, who the winners and losers&nbsp;could be;&nbsp;and how the&nbsp;Pacific Rim affects the Eurozone, Latin America, the Middle East, and Asia. Case studies focus on China, Japan, Southeast Asia, the U.S., Chile, Mexico, Russia, Korea, Canada, and Australia. </p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9541  World Views and the Real World: Foreign Policy Doctrines and Presidential Elections  (0 Credits)  
<p>Foreign affairs analysts have identified an &#8220;Obama Doctrine&#8221; that will be central to the foreign&nbsp;policy debate in the Fall 2012 election, in contrast to the world view of the Republican platform&nbsp;and nominee. Examine these contrasting views on critical contemporary global&nbsp;issues, including political change in the Arab-Muslim world, the rise of China, nuclear proliferation, and&nbsp;the environment. In addition, the course reviews the principles and electoral consequences&nbsp;of key doctrinal foreign policy debates in U.S. electoral history and the tenor and role of foreign&nbsp;affairs rhetoric in presidential elections.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9542  Genocide in the 20th Century: What Have We Learned?  (0 Credits)  
Genocide is the deliberate and systematic destruction, in whole or in part, of an ethnic, racial, religious, or national group. The term was coined as such in light of the atrocities committed during World War II. The 20th century was marked by all too many examples of history repeating itself after WWII. This course will explore the phenomenon of genocide as a product of modernity through the analysis of comparative case studies from the 20th century, including the Holocaust and events in Armenia, Rwanda, Bosnia, Cambodia, and Darfur. We will examine central debates regarding the field of genocide studies, including the legal definition of genocide, mechanisms of prevention, the hierarchy and severity of crimes in international law, the act of naming a conflict, reconciliation between victims and perpetrators, and the impact of recognition and denial of genocide on contemporary politics.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9543  The Middle East: Fallout from the Arab Spring  (0 Credits)  
<p><span style="FONT-FAMILY: ; FONT-SIZE: 12pt" new="" times="" roman?,?serif??="">The term &#8220;Arab Spring&#8221; suggested the advent of a new socioeconomic and political order in the Arab World. While some conclusions can be drawn from what has emerged since the first uprisings, the only certainty that has emerged is that the Arab world will never be the same. Examine the most important issues in today&#8217;s Arab World, including the role of internal politics; the significance of Islam in forming new constitutions; the impact of regional powers, geopolitics, and resource wars; the importance of economic development; and the effect of these changes on Arab-Israeli tensions and regional stability.</span></p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9544  Food and Water: Crisis of Our Time  (0 Credits)  
With almost a decade of rising food prices, nearly one-billion hungry people in the world, and nearly one-billion people lacking access to safe water supplies, how can food and water security be improved? Examine international and domestic food, water, and sanitation policies. Analyze the differing scenarios in developed and developing countries, as well as the roles of international organizations, sovereign governments, and civil society in ensuring food security. Case studies include agricultural subsidies in the United States, domestic food policies in Latin America, the privatization of water around the world, hydraulic fracturing in the U.S., the land grab in Africa, and export bans in Asia.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9545  Tyrants on Trial: Case Studies in Prosecuting Heads of State  (0 Credits)  
Since the end of the Cold War, an increasing number of former heads of state, political leaders, and government officials have been put on trial and held accountable for violations of human rights, economic crimes, and other such abuses of power. This trend of prosecutions has led to what some refer to as the &#8220;justice cascade,&#8221; or an established norm of individual criminal accountability for human rights violations. Examine the history and politics of the emergence of prosecutions of heads of state. Explore trends common in trials of heads of state, lessons from these prosecutions, and the existence (or not) of a resulting deterrent effect. This course draws from case studies throughout Europe, the Middle East, Africa, and Latin America, including the trials of Slobodan Milosevic, Saddam Hussein, Alberto Fujimori, Augusto Pinochet, and Charles Taylor, as well as current developments in Sudan, Libya, the Ivory Coast, and Guatemala.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9546  Rwanda: Before and After the Genocide  (0 Credits)  
Twenty years after the Rwandan genocide, issues of cultural and economic conflict remain a leading political challenge on the African continent. State collapse, protracted wars, and humanitarian crises continue to present obstacles to international conflict management. Explore the convergence of violence and memory in the context of Rwanda. Examine causes and consequences of violence before, during, and after the 1994 genocide and civil war. Analyze mechanisms of transitional justice and peace building, as well as central debates regarding the field of genocide studies, including reconciliation between victims and perpetrators and the impact of recognition on contemporary politics.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9550  SI International Relations  (0 Credits)  
<P>SI International Relations</P>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9551  SI Politics of International Economic Relations  (0 Credits)  
<P>SI Politics of International Economic Relations</P>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9552  SI International Negotiations  (0 Credits)  
SI International Negotiations<br><br><P></P>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9553  Journalism and Global Affairs  (0 Credits)  
Journalism, at its core, is a set of relationships between those who report the news and two groups: political, economic and military interests and the broader community. Discuss freedom of expression, journalism ethics, and repression of the news media, notably in China and Iran. Study news media as agents of change, from Latin America to the &quot;Arab Spring,&quot; before turning to controversies such as Wikileaks and the Snowden revelations. Explore the roles of journalism in international affairs and the impact of technological change.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9554  SI Latin America  (0 Credits)  
SI Latin America<br><br><P></P>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9555  SI NGOs  (0 Credits)  
SI NGOs<br><br><P></P>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9556  SI International Law  (0 Credits)  
<P>SI International Law</P>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9557  SI Emerging Markets  (0 Credits)  
SI Emerging Markets<br><br><P></P>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9558  SI Inside Africa Today  (0 Credits)  
SI Inside Africa Today <br><br><P></P>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9559  SI Inside Asia Today  (0 Credits)  
<SPAN style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Times New Roman','serif'; FONT-SIZE: 12pt; mso-fareast-font-family: Calibri; mso-fareast-theme-font: minor-latin; mso-ansi-language: EN-US; mso-fareast-language: EN-US; mso-bidi-language: AR-SA">GLOB1-CE9559</SPAN><br><br><P></P>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9560  SI Global Climate Change  (0 Credits)  
SI Global Climate Change<br><br><P></P>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9561  Afghanistan Today: Politics, Security, and Transition  (0 Credits)  
This summer should mark what is expected to be the first peaceful transition of political authority in Afghanistan&#8217;s history, following elections scheduled for April 2014. But will it last with the drawdown of U.S. and foreign military forces by the end of the year? What are the prospects for maintaining peace and security in the country despite an ongoing insurgency? How are Afghanistan&#8217;s neighbors, such as China, India, Iran, Pakistan, and Russia, preparing for the transition? Explore key factors affecting the fate of Afghanistan&#8217;s future, and examine the regional geopolitical challenges facing policymakers and scholars today.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9562  The North Atlantic Treaty Organization: Origins and Transformations  (0 Credits)  
<p>Since its creation in 1949, NATO has undergone a remarkable transformation. Formed to deter a Soviet attack on Western Europe, NATO has since grown from 12 to 28 member states, has shifted focus from the Soviet Union to myriad global threats, and has led major interventions far from Europe. Examine NATO&#8217;s transformation by considering the Alliance&#8217;s history, from its Cold War origins to the present. Looking toward the future, also consider the Alliance&#8217;s future in light of downward trends in European defense spending, the Obama Administration&#8217;s &#8220;pivot&#8221; to Asia, and the end of combat operations in Afghanistan.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9563  The Rise & Fall of the Left: The Impact of Socialism, Democracy, & Neoliberalism in Latin America  (0 Credits)  
Examine today&#8217;s Latin America. Has Mexico under President Pe&#241;a Nieto closed the door on the left as he opens up government-controlled energy sectors and reforms powerful unions? Did the death of President Hugo Ch&#225;vez deal a permanent blow to the Bolivarian Revolution? Can Brazil implement reforms to create a vibrant and sustainable economy? How can countries such as Peru and Bolivia exploit their commodity wealth while serving the nearby indigenous peoples? Will Chile&#8217;s new election be a shift to the left? What are the causes of ever-increasing restrictions on independent media in Venezuela, Ecuador, Nicaragua, and Argentina? Topics include the influence of various political, religious, and social trends; the challenges of extreme economic inequalities; natural and human resource management; and evolving relations with the rest of the world.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9564  Bringing the Powerful to Justice: Prosecuting Heads of State in Domestic and International Courts  (0 Credits)  
Recent developments at the International Criminal Court and African Union have highlighted the debate over whether sitting heads of state should be tried for violations of human rights and international law. Examine the history and politics of the emergence of prosecutions of heads of state. Explore common challenges and trends in trials, and discover what lessons can be learned and whether trials create a deterrent effect. Discuss the legality of immunity for heads of state in international courts. What does the act of indicting sitting heads of states and governments mean for peace, stability, and reconciliation? This course draws from case studies, including the trials of Slobodan Milosevic, Augusto Pinochet, Saddam Hussein, Alberto Fujimori, and Charles Taylor, as well as from current developments in Sudan, Kenya, and Guatemala.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9565  Saudi Arabia: History, Culture, and Politics  (0 Credits)  
Saudi Arabia is the home of Mecca and Medina, the two holiest sites of Islam, and is a pilgrimage destination for many of the world&#8217;s 1.6 billion Muslims. It is one of the only countries in the world to be named after its founding dynasts, the Al Saud. It controls one-fifth of the world&#8217;s known oil reserves, and it is the only Arab state to be a member of the G20 group of wealthy nations. Yet what do we really know about Saudi Arabia? This one-day workshop introduces you to the history, culture, and politics of the most influential country in the Arab Middle East. Beginning with an ecological and religious history of the Arabian Peninsula, investigate modern Saudi Arabia through a number of key events and themes, both historical and contemporary. Discuss the development of Wahhabism, the kingdom&#8217;s rise during the oil age, the complicated cultural life of modern Arabia, the contested place of women in Saudi society, and the regional politics of the Persian Gulf and the Middle East.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9566  BRICS: Building Blocks of a New International Order or Just a Buzzword?  (0 Credits)  
Originally thought of as the emerging markets with the greatest potential impact on global finance and trade, BRICS (Brazil, Russia, India, and China, along with South Africa) is now seen by some as the greatest challenge to the West for international influence politically as well as economically. But just how much of their vaunted economic promise can these countries deliver? And does that promise translate into political and diplomatic weight? Is BRICS a cogent group capable of exercising unified authority, or is it just a catchy acronym for countries in search of a real role? Explore these and other questions regarding BRICS, including how the China-India relationship is a key to the future.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9567  South Africa in Transition  (0 Credits)  
South Africa has become legendary for its negotiated progress from racial oppression to multiracial democracy, but the change has been more challenging than the legend implies. Discuss both the political transition that began in 1990 with the release of the African National Congress leaders and the achievements and limitations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Then, examine the unfinished work of addressing deep poverty, rampant crime, the AIDS epidemic, sex discrimination, and structural inequality&#8212;and of building the rainbow nation that its beloved leader, the late Nelson Mandela, envisioned.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9568  Trade Wars Trade Policy in the Trump Administration  (0 Credits)  
In 2018, President Trump put into effect an &ldquo;America First&rdquo; trade policy featuring protectionism and aggressive unilateralism. The administration restricted steel and aluminum imports for national security reasons, forced Canada and Mexico to revise NAFTA, and imposed massive tariffs on China that provoked massive tariff retaliation by China. The World Trade Organization is being marginalized. This course will explore the Trump administration&rsquo;s trade policy and its implications for the US economy, the world trade regime, and US and international politics.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9570  From the Inside: The United Nations at 75--Where It's Been and What Comes Next  (1 Credit)  
Founded in 1945, the United Nations is a global body with 193 member states and a founding document that begins, &ldquo;We the peoples of the United Nations determined to save succeeding generations from the scourge of war &hellip; and to reaffirm faith in fundamental human rights &hellip; and to establish conditions under which justice and respect for the obligations arising from treaties and other sources of international law can be maintained, and to promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom.&rdquo; In its 75 years of existence, the UN has developed mechanisms, tools, and a global bureaucracy to attempt to fulfill these lofty ambitions. Led by two faculty with current and extensive UN experience, this course will consider how the various UN bodies work; examine the key structures that have been created to carry out its mission; and analyze the successes and failures of the institution to date, including how and why they occurred. We also will explore what comes next for the UN&mdash;what challenges it faces, what needs to change, and if and how it can better achieve its goals in the next 75 years.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9571  Quantitative Boot Camp: Foundational Statistics for Global Affairs and Beyond  (1 Credit)  
Statistics is used across disciplines in global affairs, from energy and international development to security studies, public policy, and beyond. This course will provide a practical, hands-on foundation in basic statistics by leveraging open data sources and free, open-source data analysis tools. The course will begin by covering basic descriptive statistics, leveraging Google Sheets to run tests that allow you to understand and explain essential qualities of a dataset such as its mean, median, mode, and standard deviation. Next, explore the core battery of inferential statistics that will help you to draw conclusions about a population based on data from a sample. Using R, the class will apply its knowledge by running tests including correlation, t-test, ANOVA, and Chi-Square. Walk away from this class with the ability not only to run these tests but also to explain when and for what purpose they are used.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9600  Persuasive Writing for Global Audiences: Speeches  (0 Credits)  
This immersion into the principles, skills, and methodologies of speech writing incorporates universal techniques of presentation and persuasion to develop effective rhetoric. Use lectures, videos of classic foreign policy speeches, drills, and breakout sessions to produce draft speeches on timely international issues that you then deliver to the class for critique and review. Gain the skills to organize and write material that is powerful and compelling to the mind and ear in any language and anywhere in the world.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9601  The Politics of the Islamic World: From 1979 to the Arab Spring  (0 Credits)  
The year 1979 marks an important milestone in the modern politics of the Islamic world: the Shah of Iran was overthrown, the Soviet Union invaded Afghanistan, and a radical group of Saudis captured the Great Mosque of Mecca and declared the arrival of the end of days. Beginning in that critical year, this course traces the emergence of modern Islamic political movements and their varying manifestations across diverse continents, political systems, and societies. Study the origins and development of modern Islamic movements throughout the Middle East and the broader Islamic world&#8212;from the Muslim Brotherhood to the Salafist movement to al-Qaeda&#8212;paying close attention to the ideological and material factors that both unite them and set them apart. Consider the way Middle Eastern governments have negotiated challenges from Islamic movements, and look closely at the varied influences of the Arab Spring uprisings on the practice of politics in the region. The aim of this course is to provide a broad context for making sense of the rapid and revolutionary changes taking place across the Middle East today.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9602  The Age of the Financial Crisis: What's Next?  (0 Credits)  
The global financial crisis marks the end of era and the start of a new one. But what is next? After nearly 20 years in which global capital markets became more integrated, financial disintegration has increased and sovereigns from high-income countries have taken unprecedented measures in the financial sector and the broader economy. In this course, explore the causes and consequences of the crisis, including its impact on development, governance, and geopolitics. Also, discuss new forms of money (e.g., Bitcoin), the European Economic and Monetary Union, Abenomics, and the rise of capitalism with Chinese characteristics.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9603  1914: The History of the Descent into World War I  (0 Credits)  
One hundred years ago, the shadow of the First World War fell across Europe and much of the African and Asian continents. Its effects continue to haunt Western policymakers today. The &ldquo;Great War for Civilization&rdquo; spawned the Armenian genocide, sowed the seeds of the Balkan Wars in Bosnia and Kosovo, and precipitated the seemingly insoluble Arab-Israeli conflict. Its legacy can be clearly seen in the escalating tensions between China and Japan over the future of the Diaoyu/Senkaku islands. How did this catastrophic &ldquo;War for Civilization&rdquo; come about? This full-day course will trace the origins of this conflict from its beginnings in the French Revolution to its volcanic eruption in 1914. The culminating experience of this study will be an interactive simulation of the outbreak of World War I using primary source documents drawn from prominent Internet research sites.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9605  Ethnic Conflicts  (0 Credits)  
<P>This course introduces concepts in the literature on ethnic conflict, nationalism, and separatist movements. Through various case studies, notably, Kosovo, Gujarat, Kenya, Syria, Quebec, and Israel-Palestine, students explore the origins of cultural, linguistic, and religious pluralism, as well as emergent communal and parochial loyalties in our understanding of intra-state conflict. Also discussed are the influences of post-Cold War developments on the revival of ethnicity around the globe. Salient issues that have taken center stage in the early 21st century, particularly the contrast between global integration and regional fragmentation as well as ethical concerns pertaining to military intervention, are highlighted. </P>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9606  Urbanization and Food and Water Security  (0 Credits)  
<p>With more than half the world&#8217;s population living in cities and moving away from agriculture, how will people continue to nourish themselves? And how is the way we eat changing? This course will examine the effects urbanization has on food and water security. The course pays particular attention to the fastest developing countries and how international food production, food policy and international organizations are adapting to these trends. The rise in obesity rates, the differences between rural and urban hunger, the role of climate change, and recent land grabs&#8212;specifically in Asia (India and China), Latin America (Brazil and Colombia), and Africa (North Africa and Ethiopia)&#8212;are closely examined.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9607  "Follow" Us/"Like" Us: U.S. Public Diplomacy from the Cold War to Twitter and Facebook  (0 Credits)  
Public diplomacy &#8220;soft power&#8221; engages foreign audiences to create a sympathetic understanding of the U.S. to increase support for U.S. foreign policy. How have public diplomacy exchange and advocacy programs from the Cold War to the Arab Uprisings&#8212;from short-wave radio and magazines to Facebook and Twitter&#8212;reflected U.S. foreign policy goals in a dramatically changing geopolitical landscape? How do the programs reflect shifting views of national security, individual citizen empowerment, and the U.S. global presence? What defines success? How have U.S. approaches compared to those of other countries? Multimedia materials, case studies, and guest speakers will make for a lively group experience.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9608  Asia and the Americas: New Strategic Challenges and Alliances  (0 Credits)  
<P>This course addresses the critical issues facing Asia and the Pacific&#8212;the U.S. pivot to Asia and the associated repositioning and funding of the&nbsp;military to the Pacific Command, Asia&#8217;s deepening relationship with Latin America, the new stronger Trans-Pacific Partnership and Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation initiatives, as well as&nbsp;the growing Pacific Alliance comprised of Latin America&#8217;s ascendant economic powers: Mexico, Peru, Chile, and Colombia. The course also assesses the historic alliances of the Americas regarding the Sino-Japanese&nbsp;and Sino-ASEAN relationships and includes an examination of China&#8217;s new role as a major actor in the Western Hemisphere. <BR></P>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9609  The Arab Spring: Three Years Later  (0 Credits)  
This spring marks three years since the Arab Spring swept across the Middle East, ushering in an era of revolutionary fervor and geopolitical realignment. This course provides a general review of how the Arab Spring has evolved and examines various factors that have now come into focus, including exploring common developments shared between affected countries, tracking the rise of political Islam, examining new geopolitical alliances and shifts in the region&#8217;s political dynamics, understanding the escalating Sunni/Shiite conflict and its implications, determining the prospect for orderly transition to democracy, qualifying the evolving relationship of Sunni Arab states and Israel, and determining the Arab Spring&#8217;s impact on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Finally, the course offers a prognosis for the future stability of the Middle East.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9610  War and Security in the 21st Century  (0 Credits)  
<p>Is a war between the United States and China inevitable? Do international institutions have any power over states? Why don&rsquo;t democracies fight wars against one another? Why did the Cold War end? Addressing questions like these each week, this course uses international relations theory, policy analysis, historical case studies, and current events to delve into the most important contemporary debates in international security. Through a combination of lectures, group discussions, and in-class debates, students will engage with critical questions confronting scholars and policymakers alike.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9611  World Politics--A New Balance of Power?  (0 Credits)  
<P>These are times of much uncertainty in global political and world affairs. Major democracies, such as America, Western Europe, Japan, and India have serious economic concerns; Russia and China have unsure political prospects; and leading non-Western nations (Turkey, Brazil, Egypt) have had unexpected upheavals. There are continuing Middle East tensions, concerns about nuclear issues in Iran and North Korea, internal disruptions in Africa, etc. Are these essentially local situations or are they inter-related signs indicating a new international era? Is a new balance of power unfolding? Are historic fault lines emerging as current hot spots? Are modern technologies (e.g., electronic communications) driving current crises? How will these situations evolve and impact on the global condition? Will confrontation between nations increase or compromise and cooperation prevail? Who will be winners and losers? How will America&#8217;s position be affected? This course will focus on these and other key issues in the context of current world events.</P>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9612  Cities and Globalization  (0 Credits)  
<p>The continuing urbanization of populations around the world, especially those in developing countries and emerging markets, is transforming the dynamic of the international political and economic system. Cities are becoming centers of power and influence that are reshaping the global economy and system of governance. This course explores how the role of cities has evolved historically and will continue to change as a result of globalization. Economic topics will include cities as centers of world trade, global financial hubs, and cities' roles in global supply chains. Additionally, political and cultural topics will be discussed, such as cities' influence on the international political system, globalization, popular culture, and the arts. Finally, the course will present new trends such as urban innovation centers and the emergence of megacities in around the world with tens of millions of inhabitants. </p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9613  Brazil: Country of the Future?  (0 Credits)  
<p>This course explores Brazil&#8217;s economic and political development in a comparative&nbsp;perspective. After a brief survey of Brazil&#8217;s economic and political history, the class focuses on the political economy of structural reform and macroeconomic policy under the Cardoso, Lula, and Dilma governments, including a deeper analysis of Brazil&#8217;s political system. Students evaluate the country&#8217;s economic performance over the past decade as well as its position in the global economy by way of a comparison with other larger emerging economies (aka BRIC) and its neighbors in the Latin American region. Additionally, students evaluate Brazil&#8217;s present economic challenges and will attempt to formulate and assess a number of reform and policy proposals. Lastly, the course touches upon Brazil&#8217;s political, economic, and financial relations with its BRIC peers and the wider world, with a special emphasis on Sino-Brazilian relations.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9614  Foundations of Clean Energy  (4 Credits)  
<p>Cleantech is a dynamic and growing field with frequent new discoveries, innovations, and setbacks, along with ever-increasing urgency. This course will provide foundational knowledge of the cleantech landscape across multiple perspectives. The course will guide students in understanding traditional and nontraditional clean technologies and teach how to assess their impacts and viability. The electrical system, including clean generation, transmission, distribution, and energy efficiency, will be given focus. Industry professionals will serve as guest lecturers on key topics, including the many levels of policy, transportation, and cleantech in the developing context.</p><br><br><br><br><p><meta charset="utf-8" /></p><br><br><br><br><p dir="ltr">COURSE TOPICS:</p><br><br><br><br><ul><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Fundamentals of Energy</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">The Energy System</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Energy &amp; Environment</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Building Energy Systems</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Energy Policy</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Climate Change</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Construction of DER Resources &amp; Resilience</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li role="presentation">Transportation Systems Fundamentals</li><br><br></ul>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9615  In Real Time: The Presidential Primaries, Foreign Affairs, and Global Opinion  (1 Credit)  
Examine US presidential politics in 2020 through a domestic and international lens, tracking the unfolding primaries state by state and region by region. Discuss the role of foreign policy, past voting behavior, and emerging demographics. Evaluate what the issues and results of the primaries suggest about the shape of the general election. Explore how emerging US political developments are perceived and processed globally in media and by governments. An expert pollster will serve as a guest speaker to address how foreign affairs are used in shaping campaign platforms and tactics.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9616  Information Wars: The History, Strategy, Tactics, and Effects of Disinformation  (1 Credit)  
<p>This course will help in understanding the power, theory, strategy, tactics, and effects of information wars being waged by nation-states such as Russia and by extremist organizations. We will examine various historical and contemporary case studies of information operations by American adversaries that are used to have political, social, military, and economic influence, in the United States and around the world. Drawing on the professor&#39;s background in national security and foreign policy communications, including combating violent extremist propaganda, the course will delve further into the strategy and tactics used in various contexts to demonstrate how disinformation can be employed. Become engaged in this subject through a variety of practical discussions to learn about the effects of disinformation and the need for a coordinated effort (by government, nongovernmental organizations, the media, and social media companies) to combat disinformation.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9620  Clean Energy and the World: A Comparative Perspective  (0 Credits)  
<p>Energy remains a principal focus of attention among governments, corporations, and investors. Consider the economic and political issues surrounding clean energy development through national and global urban case studies of the new cleantech initiatives in Germany, Denmark, the United Arab Emirates, and the United States that are reshaping the energy sector. This course provides hands-on, real-world exposure to some of New York City&rsquo;s leading clean energy and energy efficiency demonstration projects through site visits and in-class briefings.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9621  The Energy System: Cleantech as a Game Changer  (0 Credits)  
<p>The provision of affordable and reliable energy is fundamental to economic activity and has far-reaching consequences for society, the environment, and human welfare. Examine the economics and finance of our current energy system with a focus on the electric power industry. Discuss anticipated trends in energy demand, consumption, efficiency, and safety. Key issues addressed include energy security, renewable power, and grid modernization (smart grid). The course also covers the environmental impacts&mdash;including climate change&mdash;of electricity production and the various regulatory approaches to deal with these and other externalities. The objective of the course is to provide a practical understanding of how the various areas of the energy sector operate and interact within the marketplace.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9622  Capstone: CGA-ACRE Certificate for Cleantech Professionals  (0 Credits)  
Gain real-world experience working directly with a New York City-based clean energy start-up company that is aligned with your interests. This is an opportunity for you to interweave theory with practice in real-time and in an unpredictable, complex, real-world environment. While working on a project with a clean energy start-up (the &ldquo;capstone host&rdquo;), meet with&mdash;and present to&mdash;faculty and fellow students regarding your work, lessons learned, and project outcomes.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9623  Analytics for Energy Professionals  (0 Credits)  
<p>This course provides a foundation for understanding and using qualitative and quantitative tools effectively within the energy sector. Explore methods for evaluation work, discuss processes to collect and analyze data, and learn how to interpret and utilize evaluation findings.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9624  Urban Infrastructure Systems  (0 Credits)  
<p>Gain an overview of key issues involved in the planning, management, operations, and maintenance of urban infrastructure systems, including transportation, water supply, power, communications, and information systems. Topics include elements of engineering and technology, management, economics, finance, and regulatory and public policy that have an impact on the sustainable development of the urban environment. The course features guest lecturers from infrastructure industries and public agencies who share significant case studies with the class.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9625  Entrepreneurship  (0 Credits)  
<p>Entrepreneurship and venture creation are key agents of innovation within the cleantech sector. Examine strategies and methods that are essential for creating and sustaining start-ups, early-stage companies, and small-business enterprises. Topics include strategic assessment and decision making; financial, human, and technology resource management; and marketing tools and tactics specifically geared toward entrepreneurs. Sessions also include lessons on investments, venture capital, public and private grantmaking opportunities, and other forms of start-up capital.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9626  Behind the Lead Story: How the Press Covers the World  (0 Credits)  
Join Alexis Gelber, a long-time top editor at <em>Newsweek</em>, in an examination of how the media&rsquo;s coverage of international events in the Middle East, Asia, Latin America, and Europe affects public attitudes and diplomatic decisions. Analyze major stories in a range of print, digital, and broadcast media, and look at how new media platforms are changing perceptions of important world developments. Leading reporters, editors, and producers share experiences about stories they have covered. Topics include opening up Cuba; the Mideast: Israel, Iran, and ISIS; 2016 presidential candidates and foreign policy; Putin&rsquo;s Russia; and doing business in China.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9630  Root Causes of Violent Extremism and Countering Measures  (0 Credits)  
<p>Survey the context behind the rise of violent extremism and identify the root causes behind it, including, but not limited to, historical developments; socioeconomic conditions; the reign of ruthless despots; the role and ambitions of regional powers; the inability to integrate young Muslims into Western societies; and finally, the self-imposed isolationism of these groups in their adopted countries. Examine the main tools available to the international community and explore ideas on how communities should counter violent extremism, including systematic approaches to field-based social understanding and psychological motivation.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9631  America in the World: Is the US Constitution in Crisis?  (0 Credits)  
<p>The Constitution is the bedrock of American democracy and government. Having endured for more than two centuries, it is the oldest written constitution still operating in the world and has been a model for many other countries. Yet the past 25 years have brought three contentious presidential impeachments, a dysfunctional Congress riven by partisanship, a more politicized&nbsp;Supreme Court, and an Electoral College that has twice delivered the White House to candidates who lost the popular vote. Public confidence in government is plummeting and policymaking rarely seems up to the challenges of the 21st century, but attempts to amend the Constitution have repeatedly ended in failure. So, is the US constitutional system no longer up to the task? Are there practicable ways to renew and revitalize it? Or may a new constitutional convention be needed? This course will explore these topics with an eye to what we can learn from America&#39;s past, from the constitutional&nbsp;experiences of other countries, and from novel proposals for reform. Students will actively participate in the course by offering their own insights, ideas, and suggestions for reform of the many problems facing American politics and government.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9633  Revolutions in Sustainability: A U.S./German Perspective  (0 Credits)  
<p dir="ltr" style="line-height:1.38;margin-top:0pt;margin-bottom:0pt;"><span style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Calibri; line-height: 17.9400005340576px; white-space: pre-wrap;">Germany has formally committed itself to deriving at least 80% of its power from renewable energy by 2050, while at the same time fully phasing out nuclear power by 2022. &nbsp;Industrial corporations and financial concerns are pushing the green movement as well, and a number of key NGOs have also advanced the clean tech agenda. </span><span><span style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">The world is in a transition to cleaner and smarter consumption and production.&nbsp;This is being driven by a number of important factors, including the looming threat of climate change; the favorable economics; a desire by nations for food, energy, and natural resource independence and security; the urge to escape from the massive burden of water and air pollution many societies still experience; and rapidly evolving technology.&nbsp;Sustainable development is no longer a dream; it&rsquo;s fast becoming a global reality. </span></span><span id="docs-internal-guid-891754a4-9ab9-cd65-9a11-93e4740e5af2"><span style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">This Global Field Intensive examines the United States and Germany&#39;s distinct approaches to renewable energy and energy efficiency, electricity transmission, and distribution, green building, and transportation. Examine some of the various social, political, economic, and technological differences between the two countries and how these have influenced their respective development in clean tech. </span></span><span id="docs-internal-guid-891754a4-9ab9-cd65-9a11-93e4740e5af2"><span style="font-family: Calibri; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">Germany has been at the epicenter of many of the most important developments in this sustainability revolution.</span></span></p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9640  Countdown to November: Primaries, Policies, and Politics in Real Time  (1 Credit)  
<p>Register for this course on the <a href="https://nyusps.gatherlearning.com/admin/events/countdown-to-november-primaries-policies-and-politics-in-real-time---spring-2024-virtual">NYU SPS Academy of Lifelong Learning</a> website.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>The course will follow real-time national, state, and local political developments with a focus on primaries - during the most decisive period of the nominating cycle. Each week, we&#39;ll focus on the current state of play and the implications for the fall contests. We&#39;ll look at how party rules and the primary calendar will jump-start the general election campaign earlier than in the past. We&#39;ll discuss the electoral implications of developing events--front-burner and emerging issues--including the economy, foreign affairs, and the legal cases that will be under way. We&#39;ll look at ideological and policy divisions within the major parties and their potential effect on the presidential, Senate and House contests, i.e. the fight for control of these bodies. And we&#39;ll look at how third parties could affect outcomes in close contests. We&#39;ll explore how demographic trends and key voter groups&#39; engagement may shape the campaigns&#39; targeting decisions for the general election campaign. Week-by-week, we&#39;ll review what the polls may be telling us (and not telling us) about the fall. We&#39;ll look at key gubernatorial and state legislative elections, and their potential impact on issues such as abortion, climate change, gender equality, reapportionment, and the future of democracy. The course will rely on current media to shape a weekly dialogue on the direction of American politics in this historically critical election. It will be highly participatory, with topical presentations followed by ample time for class discussion.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>Spring 2024 tuition is $495.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9644  The Rise of ISIS: Cause and Effect in a Changing Middle East  (0 Credits)  
Just three years after the Arab Spring, a time of hope in the Middle East, sectarian divisions and civil war gave rise to the success of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS). This course will explore the political and societal factors that led from the hope of the Arab Spring to the chaos of the Islamic State. We will discuss the nature of the ISIS threat to the West and examine what the international community is doing to defeat it. Moreover, as ISIS threatens to destabilize several more countries, to turn Arab governments against each other, and to produce perpetual war, this course also will investigate the wide-ranging effects that ISIS&rsquo;s rise has had on neighboring states and the entire region.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9646  The American Presidency: Fact vs. Fiction  (1 Credit)  
American presidents are among the most glamourized and villainized, mythologized and fictionalized government figures in the world. Yet the realities of the job--constitutionally, institutionally, and politically--a far cry from how they are often presented in popular lore and mass entertainment. This course will focus at the intersection of history, political science, and cultural studies. In interactive sessions, students will compare and contrast how movies, television, novels, and art have depicted the commander-in-chief in light of the actual historical record and the contemporary functioning of America&#39;s most powerful yet widely misunderstood political office. From <em>The West Wing</em> to the <em>John Adams</em> miniseries, from the heroic painting of &quot;Washington Crossing the Delaware&quot; to the vile machinations of <em>House of Cards</em>, this course will sort fact from fiction and shed new light on America&#39;s Chief Executive.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9654  International Financial Issues  (0 Credits)  
Countries can no longer solve economic problems unilaterally without impacting economies beyond their borders. Gain a general overview of the intersection between markets and geopolitics in today's highly complex and interconnected financial and economic landscape. Topics include the issues surrounding Greece and the Eurozone, the dollar as a reserve currency, and the Chinese currency peg.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9656  UN Peacekeeping: From Mandate to Global Action  (0 Credits)  
UN peacekeeping continues to evolve to meet new challenges and political realities. Faced with the rising demand for increasingly complex peace operations, the UN has been overstretched and challenged as never before. Examine the development of UN peacekeeping mandates and missions, from the initial negotiating stages in the Security Council through the increasingly diverse roles peacekeepers play in countries in which they are deployed. Analyze the impact that the Security Council's Iraq debate and the subsequent U.S.-led invasion have had on the UN's peace and security mechanisms, and the effectiveness of UN-led peacekeeping versus alternative arrangements.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9657  Globalizing Gender: Inclusion, Mainstreaming, and Resistance  (0 Credits)  
Gender issues have taken an increasingly significant role globally. Explore recent and current work on the mainstreaming of women's issues, sexuality, and gender issues into global development. What roles do colonial legacies and cultural relativism play in shaping norms and in debates on the politics of representation, &#8220;pink washing,&#8221; and &#8220;homonationalism&#8221;? What is their impact on global politics? Examine the strategies that state and nonstate actors in global politics use to frame, organize, and advocate the globalization of gender and sexuality, as well as resistance to&#8212;and criticism of&#8212;this movement.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9658  Essential Concepts in Security Management  (1 Credit)  
Working in the field of security today means mastering a number of processes and procedures, from risk assessment to contingency planning. Each of these is built on a foundation of key concepts, such as risk, complexity, uncertainty, accountability, and resilience. But what do these concepts actually mean? And does everyone understand them in the same way? The aim of this course is to enable security professionals and those who manage them, across a number of industries (ranging from commercial to governmental to international settings), to move beyond the process and develop a thorough appreciation for what makes security management actually work. This course will enable you to reflect on and adapt your own practices so they are in line with a new, more sophisticated understanding of the concepts that underpin the field. Explore these fundamental ideas in an environment of cooperative learning, discussion, and self-reflection. Focus will be given to identifying strengths and weaknesses, with applicability across the development, management, and security professions.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9670  Politics Meets Policy: Foreign Affairs in the 2016 Presidential Election  (0 Credits)  
<p>Foreign affairs will be a significant focus of the 2016 US&nbsp;presidential race, in both the primaries and the general election. Trends in the global landscape&mdash;such as instability in the Middle East, the rise in nonstate actors, public empowerment through social media, and the broad ideological spectrum among candidates&mdash;suggest a vigorous debate. Examine current international issues and the range of candidates&rsquo; positions with an in-depth historical review of the role of foreign affairs in US&nbsp;presidential elections, including the historical and current divide between isolationism and internationalism. Explore public opinion along with candidate rhetoric, tactics, and strategies to better understand the role of foreign affairs issues in electoral outcomes.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9671  Introduction to Clean Energy Policy  (0 Credits)  
From local sustainability programs to the US Department of Energy&rsquo;s ARPA-E initiative, government programs have and will continue to play a critical role in the growth of the clean energy economy. In some areas, government efforts are driving change and, in other areas, stifling it. Understanding the actors, mechanisms, and interplay of clean energy policy can be complex, and initiatives must be compared against each other and against doing nothing.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9672  Critical Infrastructure: Security and Resilience  (0 Credits)  
Infrastructure associated with energy, water, telecommunications, and transportation services is an essential element of any society. Few things are more impactful than an interruption to any one of these lifeline sectors. As such, the activities that align with the security and resilience of critical infrastructure are vital components of sound preparedness activities within all levels of government and industry. This course provides a framework for identifying and organizing lifeline-critical infrastructure protection and resilience activities. It establishes a foundation for engaging in risk management activities and explores restoration prioritization, dependency analysis, and infrastructure preparedness activities. The course leverages lessons learned from a wide range of all-hazards threats, all with an eye toward reducing the consequences of future interruptions.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9673  Tools of Multilateral Diplomacy: The Evolving Role of UN Sanctions  (0 Credits)  
As President Obama said in 2009 in Oslo, &ldquo;We must develop alternatives to violence that are tough enough to actually change behavior&mdash;for if we want a lasting peace, then the words of the international community must mean something&hellip;sanctions must exact a real price.&rdquo; The United Nations Security Council is increasingly turning to smart sanctions to defend international standards, without the human and financial cost of using force. The increase since 2011 in the number of UN sanctions regimes indicates the Council&rsquo;s readiness to use sanctions to address a growing list of issues, including countering terrorism, preventing nuclear proliferation, defending human rights, and supporting peaceful political transitions. Explore the UN&rsquo;s multifaceted sanctions architecture, examine implementation challenges that threaten the viability of these sanctions, and evaluate the merits of multilateral sanctions as a tool for addressing emerging global threats.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9674  Renewable Energy in an Age of Conservative Politics  (0 Credits)  
Well before the 2016 election of President Donald Trump, the US political landscape was shifting rightward. Since 2008, Democrats have suffered a net loss of 1,042 state and federal posts, including congressional and state legislative seats, governorships, and the presidency. Today, over two-thirds of state legislatures are controlled by Republicans, and in 25 states, Republicans control both legislative chambers and the governorship. Yet, against this conservative backdrop, renewable energy has flourished. What are the political origins of the current renewable energy revolution, and is this growth because of, or despite, Republican-leaning public policies? This course will provide an introductory overview of the fundamentals of policy and the role of politics in shaping the clean energy economy, including technological innovations and market factors that may determine the industry&rsquo;s continued growth.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9687  Climate Justice and Inequality  (2 Credits)  
Low income, working classes, indigenous, and people of color have historically been exposed to a disproportionate share of environmental harms. Others have gained immense wealth and power by extracting from and polluting the environment. The climate crisis is set to exacerbate this inequality, but also offer new opportunities for justice. In this course, we will trace the uneven distribution of climate harms and goods across social groups. We will ask how climate change inequality can be identified and measured and examine how groups have mobilized in the name of climate justice. Different societies, cultures, and historical moments have articulated varied (and sometimes competing) visions of climate justice, and we will follow how national, state, and city governments, firms, environmental NGOs, and justice movements are crafting responses to concerns of environmental racism, inequality, and climate change. We will explore how projects to respond to climate change can create new inequalities, and opportunities for justice, revealing difficult paradoxes between claims of justice.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9700  Emerging Economies in the International Financial System  (0 Credits)  
Explore the main features of the international monetary and financial system. Gain an understanding of the opportunities and constraints faced by the emerging economies operating in this system. Analyze various types of emerging-market (EM) financial crises and the role that the International Monetary Fund (IMF) plays in them. Become familiar with important concepts related to EM monetary, exchange rate, and fiscal policies. Finally, debate the rise of the Chinese renminbi as an international reserve currency and the potential challenge this may represent to the US dollar.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9701  The Middle East  (0 Credits)  
Explore the Arab Spring and its lasting effects on the Middle East and North Africa. Examine the Palestinian plan to secure UN recognition and its repercussions for both Israelis and Palestinians. Discuss Turkey's role as a rising player, and the extent to which Ankara might diffuse the growing tensions between various states in the region. Consider the prospect of finding a solution that stifles Tehran's nuclear ambitions peacefully despite Iran's continued intransigence in its pursuit of a nuclear program. Different facets of these issues are analyzed along with the changing intra-Arab relations and their impact on the Arab-Israeli conflict.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9702  An Introduction to Economic Advancement in the Middle East: A Global Priority  (0 Credits)  
Economic development is a matter of urgency for countries in the Middle East and North Africa&mdash;an issue that carries profound implications for global peace and security. The Arab Spring raised expectations that cannot be easily achieved in light of political instability, weak economic management, and a sluggish external economy. Oil importers in the region must design and adopt policies to spur growth and generate jobs, while the oil-exporting countries need to find ways to reduce their dependence on oil and public subsidies. Examine the economic challenges facing Middle Eastern countries, the policies most likely to address these challenges, and the most realistic prospects for realizing them.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9705  UN Essentials: Global Issues and Multilateral Approaches  (0 Credits)  
The United Nations, headquartered in New York City, is the largest multilateral organization in the world. Learn more about the UN system, including its operations and overall structure, the major issues it seeks to address, its partnerships, and its controversies. With a special focus on the work of the General Assembly and the Security Council, this intensive program provides a thorough grounding that is essential for those seeking to work within the UN system or for related institutions. Explore a variety of major themes and issues related to UN security, development, and human rights. Particular attention is given to peace and security operations, the sustainable development agenda, human rights, women and gender in international development, refugee and humanitarian aid in complex emergencies, and the roles of NGOs and the private sector in the UN. Briefings throughout the week expose you to a variety of insider perspectives, which may include those of diplomatic missions and member states of the United Nations, the Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO), civil society organizations and NGOs, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), UN Women, and the UN Department of Political Affairs. This program is recommended for those already working for diplomatic missions to the UN or for NGOs engaged in humanitarian and security work internationally, or for those seeking careers in these areas.&nbsp;This program features a variety of high-level speakers from within the UN community and site visits to UN agencies.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9706  Navigating the Arctic  (0 Credits)  
Sea ice is melting at an unprecedented rate, the long-term survival of polar bears is jeopardized, and countries are staking claims in the Arctic&#8212;but what does this really mean and why should you care? Examine the climate change behind the melting and predictions for future trends. Analyze what this melting means for shipping; natural resource exploration; and production, ecosystems, and indigenous people. Explore the geopolitics of what rules govern the Arctic now, and what conflicts and problems lie ahead. In addition to lectures, take part in a simulated short scenario exercise.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9707  Understanding Global Capital Markets: The Basics  (0 Credits)  
Gain an introduction to financial markets in this course. Learn the basic elements, including the markets&rsquo; organization, common instruments, and participants. Also, examine the cross-border movement of capital and develop a sense of the drivers. Attention will be paid to the historic and institutional development of the markets for capital, and linkages to current events and the Great Financial Crisis will be explored. Upon completion of the course, have a greater understanding of the global political economy and enhanced comprehension of economic news.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9708  Social Impact Assessment and the Private Sector in Developing Countries  (0 Credits)  
This course introduces the tools available to evaluate the societal consequences of private sector projects in developing countries. Students will learn how to analyze the possible positive economic and development benefits that business expansion might offer local communities, as well as how to measure the harm that could be caused by disruptive business activities. Such skills are used in the private sector to mitigate the reputational and operational risks that can arise from fractured relationships with local communities. These skills also are used by government officials, NGOs, and other civil society organizations to anticipate and measure the negative repercussions for local populations that may result from irresponsible business practices. By the end of the course, students will have a toolkit of assessment techniques for identifying how business expansion might affect populations in developing countries and for formulating strategies to avoid or mitigate negative outcomes.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9709  Risk Management: Critical Infrastructure Preparedness and Resilience  (0 Credits)  
Securing a network of critical infrastructure requires synergy across intelligence, protection, and resilience activities. Within the United States, a combination of man-made incidents and natural disasters has brought together disciplines in nontraditional partnerships to drive preparedness activities across the nation. This course will establish a framework for conducting threat, vulnerability, and consequence analysis, with an eye toward reducing the likelihood of infrastructure interruptions. It will explore the maturation of these activities resulting from terrorist incidents and natural disasters since September 11, 2001, and it will highlight the newly developed partnerships across government and private sector entities. Focus will be given to identifying lessons learned for applicability across the development and security professions.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9711  The Art of Negotiation: From Global to Local  (0 Credits)  
Gain an in-depth understanding of the application of negotiation. Focus on the theory, principles, and all the elements that must carefully be considered throughout the negotiating process. Develop a negotiating strategy consistent with the overall objective of the parties involved. Real-life case studies will include political, social, and business examples, in addition to real estate negotiations that will provide firsthand experience on how to negotiate effectively and successfully. Scores of examples will be used to demonstrate the common denominators and negotiating strategies to reach mutually gainful and sustainable agreements.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9712  The US in the World: North, South, and Central America  (0 Credits)  
The United States is moving in new directions regarding sociopolitical and economic relations with Western Hemisphere neighbors. From the Monroe Doctrine to the present, the US has played decisive roles in the Hemisphere; what are the new roles envisioned by the Trump administration? How have allies and foes within the Hemisphere responded to recent American pronouncements? Could current US relations within North America force Mexico and Canada to decouple as NAFTA is examined and renegotiated? Will relations with Central and South America significantly change as a result of Trump&rsquo;s actions regarding immigration and America First policies? Discuss the US positioning with long-term allies, and analyze the threats and opportunities going forward. What may the consequences be of new border regulations affecting immigration flows throughout the hemisphere? And what are the consequences of legal challenges, tariff policy changes, and political retaliations? It has been a turbulent period since the Trump administration took office, and we will assess how the Trump world view has affected alignments in the Americas, as well as the strengthening of hemispheric ties with China. Who will be the winners and losers as we close the decade?
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9713  Solar Energy Fundamentals: Engineering, Policy, and Deployment  (1 Credit)  
This course provides a comprehensive analysis of solar photovoltaics (PV) as a clean energy solution. Gain an introduction to solar systems engineering, policy and regulatory drivers, and deployment drivers. In the systems engineering segment, learn the science behind photovoltaic modules and their arrangement in series and parallel combinations to form arrays, inverter power electronics, and highlight racking equipment for rooftop, carport, and ground mount deployments. An introduction to the technical evaluation of installations will closely follow the industry-standard NABCEP system design criteria. The widespread adoption of this technology is dependent on a variety of major policy and regulatory drivers, such as federal incentives (ITC, depreciation), state incentives (RECs, rebates, net metering, etc.), and decreasing system costs that support evaluating the commercial deployment of solar energy today. Using industry standards, consider different deployment scenarios and apply simple technical and financial evaluation metrics.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9714  Policy Challenges of Economic Globalization  (0 Credits)  
In this introduction to economic globalization and interdependence, examine the dynamic interaction of politics and economics in the world economy. Discuss the recent book by Steven Weisman, <em>The Great Tradeoff: Confronting Moral Conflicts in the Era of Globalization</em> (2016). Also, explore alternative ideological perspectives on political economy, the evolution of the international economic order, the UN sustainable development goals, and the roles of international economic institutions such as the IMF and WTO. By the end of the course, have a fundamental understanding of key questions and issues about international economic policy and the world economy, including trade and monetary policy and the globalization of production and finance.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9715  The European Union's Role in Resolving Multiple Middle East Conflicts  (0 Credits)  
Given the increasing turmoil in the Middle East, the European Union is more eager than ever before to play a larger role in settling regional conflicts. Europe is suffering from domestic Islamic radicalization and is actively seeking resolutions to significantly reducing radicalization at home, while protecting its extensive interests in the region. The myriad regional issues&mdash;the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, the fight against ISIS, and the war in Syria, among many others&mdash;necessitate a comprehensive yet nuanced approach in the search for resolutions. Yet, with the looming political reality of Brexit, the Union is being tested in unprecedented ways. This course will focus on how the EU functions, what its role is in Middle Eastern politics and diplomacy, and what the future of the EU looks like with so many domestic and foreign challenges.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9716  Macroeconomic Principles for Understanding the Modern Economy  (0 Credits)  
Has the American economy fully recovered from the Great Recession? What caused the European debt crisis? Should the Federal Reserve raise interest rates? Why does the United States have such large trade deficits with China and the rest of the world? This course aims to impart the macroeconomic concepts that underlie the theoretical groundwork for thinking about these questions and other real-world policy issues that require an understanding of how a modern economy operates. The course will cover a broad range of topics in macroeconomics, including an introduction to key measurements of economic performance such as growth, inflation, and unemployment. We will examine the importance of economic variables such as interest and exchanges rates and see how they are determined. Through long-term and short-term economic models, we will explore the relationships between money, banking, and the real economy.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9718  Comparative Political Systems  (2 Credits)  
Global affairs is largely driven by the actions taken by states, which are, in turn, heavily influenced by the internal political processes, governmental institutions, and regime characteristics that shape policymaking within these state actors. Yet the study of international relations too often overlooks the powerful impact of these factors, including democracy versus authoritarianism, parliamentary versus presidential structures, and variations among constitutions and judiciaries and among electoral and party systems. In this interactive course, gain a broad overview of comparative political systems while also tailoring your own course work to target the specific countries that are of greatest interest and significance to you. Drawing upon a wide range of models, concepts, and examples from comparative politics, this course will provide the opportunity to craft either a policy memo or a potentially publishable op-ed article.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9720  Understanding the 2016 Presidential Election  (0 Credits)  
Examine the presidential election as it unfolds during the fall of 2016. Review the primary elections and the party conventions; examine important historical precedents; and review key structures, such as the Electoral College. Analyze the debates and around Election Day itself, including the many so-called &ldquo;down-ticket&rdquo; races for congress, governorships, etc. Then, review the outcome of the election and look ahead toward the transition to a new administration, in particular the implications for US foreign policy over the next four years. Discuss the comparative / international dimension of how the American system of choosing its chief executive is highly unusual in the world.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9721  ISIS and the Media  (0 Credits)  
ISIS&mdash;also known as the Islamic State, ISIL, and Daesh&mdash;came into its own as a force roughly two years ago. In that short time, from its power plays in the Middle East to the horrific attacks in Paris and Brussels, much of what the world has come to know about the group has been through the media: journalism by Western reporters and documentary film producers and the group&rsquo;s own media outreach. In addition to the brutal, videotaped beheadings that have become ISIS hallmarks, the group publishes a magazine, <em>Dabiq,</em> and utilizes social media to recruit new members. In this course, we will examine what we know about ISIS from award-winning journalism, and we will explore the terror group&rsquo;s own media initiatives. We also will analyze and critique journalistic accounts of ISIS methods and practices. We will explore whether ISIS fighters are motivated purely by a fundamentalist view of Islam or, as Fareed Zakaria recently wrote, whether &ldquo;today&rsquo;s terrorists are not religious extremists who became radicals but rather radicals who became religious extremists.&rdquo; We also will examine the role that technology has played in the Islamic State&rsquo;s media and propaganda efforts.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9723  Global LGBTI Rights  (0 Credits)  
Over the past decade, issues pertaining to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) rights have moved from the periphery of global affairs to a major topic in international human rights. This online course will provide a detailed examination of how these issues have evolved and how they have been addressed at the UN and in other international forums. Topics to be covered include the role of global civil society; the contributions of bilateral and multilateral diplomacy; the involvement of the UN treaty bodies, the Human Rights Council, and the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights; policy areas including discrimination, violence, health, and family issues; and the evolving position of sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, and sexual characteristics (SOGIESC) under international law and public policy.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9724  Doing Business in China in an Era of Questionable Globalization  (0 Credits)  
The phrase &ldquo;Made in China&rdquo; elicits both positive and negative reactions. On one hand, multinational corporations understand the value of globalization and efficiency; however, trying to convince this to a manufacturing employee based in Detroit whose job was recently outsourced can be much harder. The US and China, the world&rsquo;s two biggest trading partners, have one of the most dynamic and codependent relationships in the world. Given the heightened importance of China, both in the US and globally, American students and professionals require a more-nuanced understanding of the critical changes that are shaping current Sino-US economic relations. What factors are critical in enabling multinational companies, nonprofit organizations, and entrepreneurs to be successful in China? What&rsquo;s at stake with a potential US trade war with China? These questions and others will be explored in this course. Moreover, this course offers students the opportunity to develop and hone their negotiating skills, coupled with gaining a stronger conceptual and analytical framework by which to understand the Sino-US bilateral relationship, which will help to further equip and prepare future leaders who are entering the private sector, government, and other careers to succeed.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9725  Practicing Qualitative Research  (0 Credits)  
This in-depth, hands-on course introduces critical concepts in qualitative thinking; provides opportunities to analyze qualitative studies; walks you through the design of a mini-study; and incorporates practical sessions in interviewing, focus groups, and participant observation. You can tailor the course&rsquo;s practical component to topics related to your professional and personal interests. Documentaries, interactive sessions, and field explorations will help you to truly grasp &ldquo;qualitative&rdquo; thinking and to become proficient in the practice of qualitative research.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9801  Hacking for Defense Intensive  (0 Credits)  
This is a beta version of the full credit course of Hacking 4 Defense
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9802  East Asia Today  (0 Credits)  
<p>East Asia, the world&rsquo;s most densely populated region, has stepped into the international spotlight as a center of economic growth. It is a region under rapid transformation, struggling between historical baggage and many challenges for potential opportunities ahead. The goal of this course is a better understanding of domestic politics, as well as international relations, in contemporary East Asia. We pay particular attention to seven Asian countries: India, China, Japan, South Korea, Myanmar, Vietnam, and Singapore. We analyze key economic, political, social, security, and cultural issues in these countries from a comparative perspective.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9803  Beyond the Headlines: The Balance of Power in a Post-Pandemic World  (1 Credit)  
<p>The COVID-19 pandemic and global recession have left indelible scars on global power, accelerating some existing trends and upending others. The rise of far-right parties and demagogues appears to have ended, with the so-called populist leaders failing to contain the coronavirus. After four years of President Trump, American leadership in the world has been undermined, from the UN to NATO to the Iran nuclear deal. Allies are deeply skeptical about long-term US commitments, while at the same time relying on American leadership. The EU has survived the existential threats of Brexit and the Syrian refugee crisis, but migration flows from the south will intensify with climate change, while Russian interference from the east shows no sign of abating. In the Middle East, Saudi Arabia and Iran continue to destabilize and reshape a region that is still recovering from the unfinished legacy of the Arab Spring. In Asia, the inexorable economic rise of both China and India is realigning global power as well as domestic politics. Meanwhile, the triple crises of climate, global health, and recession have pushed the world backward in its goal of achieving the Sustainable Development Goals in the next 10 years. What are the root causes of the current geopolitical trends and how will they unfold in the next 12 to 24 months? Where will those trends leave the United States and its allies? This course will contextualize global news and politics with both historic and forward-looking perspectives.<br /><br><br><br /><br><br><a href="https://cdnapisec.kaltura.com/p/1674401/sp/167440100/embedIframeJs/uiconf_id/23435151/partner_id/1674401?iframeembed=true&amp;playerId=kaltura_player&amp;entry_id=1_s2ba11lw" target="_blank"><strong>WATCH THE OVERVIEW VIDEO</strong></a></p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9811  Facilitating Intergroup Dialogue  (0 Credits)  
Building the capacity of groups to dialogue, create, and collaborate is a skill that is needed across many spectrums and by many organizations, both nationally and globally. Through this course, gain a critical introduction to the role that facilitation can play in creating space for groups to build authentic relationships, learn, unlearn, be creative, and take action. After taking this course, which will feature group exercises, readings, guest speakers, and class discussions, you will walk away with facilitation skills and structures to start a reflective practice.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9812  Understanding Terrorism, Radicalization, and Violent Extremism in the 21st Century  (0 Credits)  
With the attacks of 9/11 and now the rise of ISIS, there is an increasing emphasis on countering terrorism and violent extremism at home and abroad. As a result, law enforcement, practitioners, and policymakers have focused their attention on understanding the radicalization process. What exactly are terrorism and violent extremism and how can we differentiate them from other kinds of violent behavior? What are the key strategies and objectives of terrorist groups? What are the motivations for participating in terrorism and violent extremism, and how does knowledge of the radicalization process inform or obscure our understanding? How do lone-acting terrorists differ from members of terrorist groups? What role does the Internet play in radicalization and recruitment? What role do societal factors, such as the media and public opinion, play in dealing with terrorism? How can we deter involvement in terrorism and encourage the disengagement and rehabilitation of those involved through, for example, &ldquo;deradicalization&rdquo; programs? This course examines these questions through a combination of lectures, case studies, and an in-class hostage crisis simulation.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9891  Introduction to Monitoring and Evaluation  (0 Credits)  
Gain a basic foundation in monitoring and evaluation program design and implementation. Explore the tools and techniques used to measure project progress and report outcomes to internal and external stakeholders. This course will introduce the fundamentals of monitoring and evaluation (M&amp;E), while addressing questions such as the following: What is monitoring and evaluation? Why do it? Who does it? Learn how to conduct a monitoring and evaluation program for development organizations, NGOs, or private organizations in the development, peacebuilding, energy, gender studies, or transnational security sectors. By the end of this course, you will be able to develop a monitoring and evaluation theoretical framework.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9892  Transitional Justice and Memory  (0 Credits)  
This course explores the convergence of violence and memory in the context of postconflict societies through the use of case studies and the theoretical questions they raise. Does each society implement its own unique structure for dealing with mass atrocity and human rights, or can we examine individual and collective trauma through a cross-cultural lens? This course draws from classic and modern texts to analyze the ways in which postconflict societies shape collective memory through various transitional justice mechanisms, such as memorials, truth commissions, and courts. We will draw from examples in countries such as Rwanda, Uganda, Sierra Leone, Guatemala, Argentina, Chile, Peru, and Colombia, in addition to historical examples such as the Holocaust, the Cambodian genocide, and the war crimes committed in the former Yugoslavia.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9904  Deconstructing the Foreign Exchange Market: Organization, Drivers, and Impact  (0 Credits)  
The foreign exchange market is the largest of the capital markets, with an average daily turnover of an estimated $4 trillion. Currencies are no longer fixed&#8211;&#8211;and with no anchor and valuation is more elusive&#8211;&#8211;causing a significant political and economic impact. Examine various aspects of the foreign exchange market, including how it is organized, its primary players, and their motivations. Discuss formalized models of exchange rate determination, current drivers of the exchange rate, and the role of the dollar as a reserve asset, including its current challenges and challengers.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9905  Climate Change After The Paris Summit: Politics, Economics, Business, and Finance  (0 Credits)  
Climate change&mdash;coupled with the costs, benefits, and risks of action or inaction&mdash;is the most global topic of all, one that ignores national boundaries. This course focuses on how the world will coordinate to slow down and adapt to the effects of climate change in the wake of last December&rsquo;s 21st UN Climate Summit in Paris. Gain an understanding of what was accomplished in Paris and what issues remain outstanding in the crusade to avoid catastrophic global climate change. Special attention will be given to the United States, the world&rsquo;s largest historical emitter of greenhouse gases, where the population&rsquo;s lifestyle accounts for the world&rsquo;s highest per capita &ldquo;carbon footprint.&rdquo;
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9908  China and Singapore: Two Very Different States of Mind  (0 Credits)  
Analyze the policies of Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping's "Gaige Kaifang" (Reforms and Openness), which laid the foundation for the rapid economic growth and global influence of China today. In the early eighties, thousands of top Chinese civil servants were sent to Singapore to learn the best practices of governments and corporations. Examine the influence of Singapore's institutions and macro-economic regulatory policies on China's vigorous economic growth and expansion and discover how this influence helped turn China into a dominant force in today's global economy. Gain insights into what "capitalism with Chinese characteristics" entails by studying the model of the Suzhou Industrial Park, a joint venture between China and Singapore to develop a modern industrial township.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9909  Singapore and China: Two Unique Growth Experiences  (0 Credits)  
Study the rebranding of Singapore and its transition from a small port to a manufacturing center, and then to a global financial center&#8212;all before culminating in the challenges it faces today&#8211;&#8211;which include deregulating and liberalizing the economy and creating a new country that emphasizes innovation, creativity, and entrepreneurship. Examine to what extent Singapore has successfully used policies to overcome obstacles, and which of these experiences can be transplanted to China&#8211;&#8211;a country that is significantly more complex in terms of history, culture, population, and geography.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9910  Global Entrepreneurship and Ecosystems  (0 Credits)  
Whether in Buenos Aires or Beirut, Mombasa or Mumbai, people across continents are using entrepreneurship to solve the problems that have plagued them for so long and to revolutionize the systems that have denied them progress. They are doing what Silicon Valley did to corporate America&mdash;impelling the establishment to abandon outdated and hierarchical processes and to adopt more flexible and collaborative practices. Individuals in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East who have promising ideas are driving change. They are turning the start-up dream&mdash;once limited to Silicon Valley&mdash;into a universal one. This course looks at seven obstacles in seven countries and examines what seven inspired entrepreneurs have done to overcome them. It is an in-depth look at an emerging economic force that is transforming societies just as completely as Steve Jobs and other Silicon Valley idols did just decades ago.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9911  The First 100 Days: The US Presidency and Foreign Affairs  (0 Credits)  
Review the critical policy, personnel, and public affairs dimensions of the new presidential administration, with special reference to global affairs. We will explore the key elements of the transition from campaign to governance: setting the strategic foreign policy agenda, identifying priorities, communicating domestically and globally, establishing congressional relations, initiating legislation, and mobilizing public support. Follow political and policy developments in real time on current media and with expert guest speakers.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9912  International Conflict Resolution  (0 Credits)  
This course will employ a multifaceted approach to international conflict resolution, exploring the principles and theories that inform the negotiation process and its practical application in search of solutions to conflicts. The course will closely examine eight current conflicts and their unique characteristics from historical, religious, and cultural perspectives, evaluating how these characteristics might impact the search for a solution. Case studies will include the Turkey-Kurdish conflict, Iran and Saudi Arabia, the Syrian civil war, Afghanistan, the fight against ISIS, the Sunni-Shiite schism in Iraq, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, and the Turkish-Armenian conflict.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9913  Gender in International Affairs  (2 Credits)  
<p>Since the Universal Declaration of Human Rights was adopted in 1948, gender has played an increasingly central role in the conduct of international affairs. Global civil society has organized to advocate for the rights of women and girls; several major international agreements, commissions, and conferences have addressed gender equality; and feminist critiques have informed the development of international relations. At the same time, there has been considerable social and political backlash, and severe problems of discrimination and violence persist, including socioeconomic inequities, denial of sexual and reproductive rights, sexual assault, and numerous other forms of oppression. This course will provide a broad multidisciplinary overview of key concepts regarding gender in international affairs, including the application of a &ldquo;gender perspective&rdquo; and the practice of &quot;gender mainstreaming.&quot; It also will take into account intersectional perspectives and evolving conceptions of gender and sexuality, including LGBTI status.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>COURSE TOPICS:</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><ul><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Key Terms, Concepts, and Debates in Gender in International affairs</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Global Foundations of Gender Equality and Non-Discrimination</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>The Gender Perspective</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Gender Mainstreaming</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Expanding Understandings of Gender and Sexuality</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>The Evolution of Gender Equality and Equity in the US</li><br><br></ul><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>This course is eligible towards the completion of the <a href="https://www.sps.nyu.edu/professional-pathways/certificates/global-affairs-and-fundraising/global-affairs.html">Certificate in Global Affairs</a>&nbsp;or <a href="https://www.sps.nyu.edu/professional-pathways/certificates/global-affairs-and-fundraising/international-development.html">Certificate in International Development</a> (please note, this course can only be used towards one Certificate).&nbsp;Bundle your coursework and earn a professional credential that communicates knowledge and skills gained. Declared Certificate students receive 10% off of courses within the program.&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p dir="ltr">&nbsp;</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9914  Peacemaking and Peacebuilding  (2 Credits)  
<p>This course will explore contemporary methods for peacemaking and peacebuilding as responses to real and pertinent internal and external conflicts, relating to internal and international peacebuilding measures. There will be an emphasis not only on addressing conflict through high-level diplomacy - often thought of as &quot;peacemaking&quot; - but also with an emphasis of what local communities increasingly understand as &quot;peacebuilding,&quot; in the form of restorative justice and long term peacebuilding efforts which consists of, but is not limited to, a set of highly interdependent social, religious, and political approaches to interpersonal, international conflict.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>This course is eligible towards the completion of the <a href="https://www.sps.nyu.edu/professional-pathways/certificates/global-affairs/global-affairs.html">Certificate in Global Affairs</a> or <a href="https://www.sps.nyu.edu/professional-pathways/certificates/global-affairs/international-development.html">Certificate in International Development</a> (please note, this course can only be used towards one Certificate). Bundle your coursework and earn a professional credential that communicates knowledge and skills gained. Declared Certificate students receive 10% off of courses within the program.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9915  The Cold War: Tales and Takeaways  (0 Credits)  
The Cold War&mdash;a struggle for global dominance&mdash;concluded without a shot ever directly exchanged between its two great protagonists, the United States and the Soviet Union. Yet it was as seismic a conflict as the two bloody world wars that preceded it, and its impact will continue to shape events for generations to come: China&rsquo;s rise (some would say &ldquo;return&rdquo;) to global preeminence can be straight-lined from the Cold War, while much of today&rsquo;s upheaval in the Middle East and elsewhere cannot be accounted without reference to it. And the Cold War&rsquo;s influence can be seen far from the realm of politics, reaching deeply into technology, culture, and even language. But questions about the Cold War&mdash;some of them very basic&mdash;remain more than 25 years since it ostensibly ended: Why did it start? When did it start? Is it over? Was it a struggle of military might and economic power, or was it a contest of values? Who gained the most from it, which is a very different question from who won it? We will review these and other questions using contemporary and current sources from both the American and Soviet/Russian sides, trying to see where perceptions about the Cold War end and truth about it begins.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9916  Intro to Analytics and Digital Tools for Global Nonprofit  (0 Credits)  
Nonprofits work to change the world, but how do such organizations analyze and measure the impact they have? This course is geared toward individuals in, or thinking about getting involved in, the nonprofit sphere who seek to acquire the skills for tracking and measuring impact. Begin by studying a theory of impact mapping, and then gain a foundation in Google Analytics so that you can work toward getting certified with that tool. Next, you will learn how to use social media advertising and branding and how to apply for, manage, and employ the Google Ad Grant as an impact tool. At the end of the course, you will leave with both a theoretical grounding and technological skills that can be utilized at any social impact organization.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9917  International Political Economy  (2 Credits)  
<p>This course provides an introduction to international political economy (IPE) - the interaction of economics and politics, of markets and government, in the international arena. The course has three fundamental premises: first, economic factors play an important role in international relations; second, the world economy has become integrated and interdependent; third, political institutions and policies have a significant impact on the world economy. The goal of the course is to give students a better understanding of the world economy, the nature of international economic issues, the roles of international economic institutions and multinational enterprises, and the policy challenges of economic interdependence. The course is intended to provide an interdisciplinary analytical framework for the subject incorporating political science, economics, and recent history and to examine contemporary issues of international economic relations.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p><strong>COURSE TOPICS:</strong></p><br><br><br><br><ul><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>International Trade: Theory, Institutions, and Current Topics</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>International Finance: Exchange Rates &amp; Financial Crises</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Environmental, Social &amp; Governance Issues and the Global Economy</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>History of Globalization</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Country Risk and the Credit Rating Agencies</li><br><br></ul><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>This course is eligible towards the completion of the <a href="https://www.sps.nyu.edu/professional-pathways/certificates/global-affairs/global-affairs.html">Certificate in Global Affairs</a>. Bundle your coursework and earn a professional credential that communicates knowledge and skills gained. Declared Certificate students receive 10% off of courses within the program.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9918  Foundations of Transnational Security  (2 Credits)  
<p>The concerns of national and international security have evolved considerably since the days of the Cold War. While states are still concerned with traditional threats such as military aggression from other states, emerging issues present different, yet no less compelling, challenges to security. These new challenges include terrorism, failed states, environmental catastrophes, and major public health crises. Explore how security policy issues are addressed at the national and international levels. How prepared are agencies and organizations to meet newer security challenges? How prepared is the international community to handle environmental volatility? To what extent can technology be relied upon as a tool to address current security needs?</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>Examine how states and non-state actors address these growing threats to global peace and security. Learn how state and non-state actors work together (or not) to mitigate these threats. This course is open to students of national and international security who wish to broaden their understanding of policy and procedure as well as security professionals looking to develop understanding of the new challenges to security.</p><br><br><br><br><p><strong>COURSE TOPICS</strong></p><br><br><br><br><ul><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Transnational Security&mdash; Definitions, Threats &amp; Actors</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Fragile States and New Security Issues</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Terrorism and Organized Crime</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Global Health and the Disease Burden</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>Climate Change and Security</li><br><br>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<li>The Future of Transnational Security</li><br><br></ul><br><br><br><br><p>This course is a mix of asynchronous weekly modules and synchronous live sessions.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>This course is eligible towards the completion of the <a href="https://www.sps.nyu.edu/professional-pathways/certificates/global-affairs-and-fundraising/global-affairs.html">Certificate in Global Affairs</a>. Bundle your coursework and earn a professional credential that communicates knowledge and skills gained. Declared Certificate students receive 10% off of courses within the program.&nbsp;</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9919  The Americas' Season of Discontent: Political Upheavals, Trade, Trump, and Social Unrest  (2 Credits)  
Latin America is experiencing a wave of anger and discontent that has turned major cities into battlefields. Much has happened in the region over the past year. Have class conflicts been converging in various countries, or are they unique to specific nations and situations? What are the similarities and differences in Bolivia, Nicaragua, Colombia, Panama, and Chile? Has the unrest been too quickly characterized as a &ldquo;tsunami against elites&rdquo;&mdash;a backlash against rising inequality&mdash;or is that too simple an explanation? Have new leaders in Mexico, Brazil, and Argentina implemented effective changes that can provide more transparency and opportunity? Has populism mutated into authoritarianism, or has there been effective public resistance to presidential attempts throughout the hemisphere to alter existing institutions and constitutions? How has President Trump changed US relationships in the Americas with such actions as enthusiastic personal support of Jair Bolsonaro, the development of a new trade deal (USMCA) to replace NAFTA, ongoing personal attacks of Justin Trudeau, and a failed strategy to oust Maduro in Venezuela? Join in the analysis and assessment of challenges facing the Americas at the start of the new decade.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9920  Global Civil Society Organizations  (0 Credits)  
Civil society organizations (CSOs) have long been forces for change on the local and global scene. In recent decades, the scope and impact of CSOs have grown considerably, aided by the speed of communications and the emergence of new partners. In this course, analyze the evolving role of CSOs by examining their interactions with international organizations and the private sector, as well as their role in setting the agenda for change at local, national, and international levels. Also, examine how CSOs raise money, implement global humanitarian projects, and respond to emerging challenges.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9921  Radicalization and Deradicalization of Muslim Youth  (0 Credits)  
In the last 15 years, the Arab world has experienced an unprecedented wave of Islamic radicalization, often attributed to incorrect sources and sometimes erroneously dismissed as a passing phenomenon. This course will examine the root causes behind the rise of Islamic radicalism and will cover the historical, psychological, religious, political, ideological, and socioeconomic dimensions that have contributed to its rise. While Islamic radicalism will be with us for years, if not decades, this course will explore the ways by which Western governments, civil society, the media, and individuals should collaborate to reduce its overall intensity. In particular the focus will be on the role that Arab states should play to choke off radicalism, which, although rooted in their lands, they are either unwilling or unable to tackle effectively.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9923  Energy and the Environment  (2 Credits)  
<p>It&rsquo;s been said that you can&rsquo;t really know where you are going until you know where you have been. Fossil fuels generated the standard of living presently enjoyed by developed nations; however, the policies and practices that led to their proliferation also rendered serious harm to the environment and emitted unprecedented levels of greenhouse gases that are expediting changes to the climate. Business as usual is no longer sustainable. In this course, students will develop a foundation from which to chart an environmentally conscious path toward decarbonizing the energy sector.</p><br><br><br><br><p>This course is eligible towards the completion of the <a href="https://www.sps.nyu.edu/professional-pathways/certificates/global-affairs-and-fundraising/global-affairs.html">Certificate in Global Affairs</a>&nbsp;or <a href="https://www.sps.nyu.edu/professional-pathways/certificates/global-affairs-and-fundraising/international-development.html">Certificate in International Development</a> (please note, this course can only be used towards one Certificate).&nbsp;Bundle your coursework and earn a professional credential that communicates knowledge and skills gained. Declared Certificate students receive 10% off of courses within the program.&nbsp;</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9924  International Development  (2 Credits)  
<p>Why do some countries develop rapidly while others, even with similar resources, languish? What can be done at domestic and international levels to lift people out of extreme poverty? This course will cover the main elements of development as a national and global issue from multiple perspectives&mdash;economic, political, social, and environmental. It will consider the role of the major actors, including international financial institutions; the United Nations system with its goals for equitable and sustainable human development; and other multilateral, bilateral, and nongovernmental institutions. The readings and discussions will introduce key development analysts from both the West and the developing world that will provide insights into why poverty and related issues persist and what can be done about it. In class, we will consider factors that contribute to or impede development success through case studies of countries at various stages: the least developed, those moving upward, and those that have risen to middle income status.</p><br><br><br><br><p>&nbsp;</p><br><br><br><br><p>This course is eligible towards the completion of the <a href="https://www.sps.nyu.edu/professional-pathways/certificates/global-affairs-and-fundraising/global-affairs.html">Certificate in Global Affairs</a>&nbsp;or <a href="https://www.sps.nyu.edu/professional-pathways/certificates/global-affairs-and-fundraising/international-development.html">Certificate in International Development</a> (please note, this course can only be used towards one Certificate).&nbsp;Bundle your coursework and earn a professional credential that communicates knowledge and skills gained. Declared Certificate students receive 10% off of courses within the program.&nbsp;</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9930  Global Capital Markets and the Importance of Foreign Exchange  (0 Credits)  
The foreign exchange market is the largest of the capital markets, with an average daily turnover of $4 trillion. It is a key nexus for the international economy and for global finance. Explore various aspects of the foreign exchange market, including how it is organized, its primary players, and their motivations. Gain insights into short- and long-term drivers of prices, challenges to the dollar, and how the dollar is affected by global events such as China's rise and the European debt crisis.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9942  The Effect of Climate Change on the Global Environment  (0 Credits)  
Climate change is often associated with apocalyptic images and scenarios. Gain a comprehensive introduction to climate change, including what it is, what we know about it, and its global impact. Questions considered include: What are the different causes of climate change? What could climate change mean for biological diversity, weather, the global economy, and international peace and security? What is being done about climate change in the international community? What types of technologies might help reduce climate change? And finally, what can we do as individuals to help reduce climate change?
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9943  Creating a Nonprofit in a Global Landscape: A Comprehensive and Practical Approach  (0 Credits)  
Nonprofits and civil society organizations play an important role in the developed world and are also critical to the growth of developing countries. As the importance of nonprofits has grown, the sector has been &#8220;professionalized,&#8221; as donors, funders, and affiliates demand more efficiency and transparency while nonprofits seek employees with advanced credentials. Through creative lectures and activities, this course addresses developing a mission and vision, strategic branding, legal and logistical considerations, monitoring and evaluation, fundraising, and more.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9950  MSGA Global Field Intensive  (0 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
This is a Career Advancement Course option for students participating in an M.S. in Global Affairs Global Field Intensive program. Students must receive special permission from the M.S. in Global Affairs administration in order to register for this course.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9951  Covert Action: From Poisoned Cigars to Hellfire Missiles and Cyberattacks  (0 Credits)  
Covert action is a critical&mdash;and widely misunderstood&mdash;tool of U.S. foreign policy. By exploring the evolution of U.S. government covert action from the Cold War to the present, students will gain insight into the historical and contemporary workings of covert action while engaging in debates over the ethics and efficacy of this aspect of statecraft. Begin by focusing on the history of covert action as well as the nuts-and-bolts of authorization and oversight in the United States. In the afternoon session, we will examine three case studies: the Kennedy Administration&rsquo;s efforts to overthrow Fidel Castro, the Bush and Obama Administrations&rsquo; drone program, and the Bush and Obama Administrations&rsquo; efforts to subvert the Iranian nuclear program.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9952  Urban Transportation Policy and Planning  (0 Credits)  
This one-day course will give an overview of transportation policy and planning in cities in developed and developing countries through two case studies. Gain an understanding of common transportation practices and challenges in terms of land use, financing, and politics. Explore factors that influence public policy at local, national, and international levels. By the end of the course, be able to answer the following questions: What is transportation infrastructure, and how is it typically funded in developing and developed countries? What constitutes public transportation? What is bus rapid transit and how does it compare to a subway system? Also, learn about policy memo writing and turn in a transportation planning-focused policy memo.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9957  Buenos Aires: A Case Study in Sustainable Development  (0 Credits)  
Civil society initiatives are leading the way toward innovative strategies in the development arena. South America&#8211;&#8211;Buenos Aires in particular&#8211;&#8211;provides vibrant examples of how bottom-up strategies can enable communities to improve their own development, whether it be in the political, social, or economic arena. Examine the initiatives taken by civil society and government to tackle issues such as economic empowerment, anti-corruption, workers rights, and community development. Meet with a variety of organizations through site visits and briefings. Organized lectures provide students with the contextual knowledge needed for analysis.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9958  Youth as Agents of Change in Peacebuilding  (0 Credits)  
As the shift in modern warfare has made civilians primary targets, the role of youth in war and peacebuilding has taken on greater urgency. Using three case studies from recent conflict zones, examine both the productive and destructive roles played by youth in peacebuilding. Discuss how youth have been affected by conflict, how the various actors in their respective countries' peacebuilding efforts have viewed them, and how their inclusion and exclusion in peacebuilding have affected those efforts. Overarching themes include child soldiers, conventions that seek to protect youth, the role of education, the difficulties in defining "youth" and youth as agents of change.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9959  Foreign Aid: The New Role of Corporate and Private Giving  (0 Credits)  
Low-income countries have traditionally relied upon aid from foreign governments to help them pursue policies for sustainable development, but official aid budgets are under strain and unlikely to grow sufficiently in the coming years. Corporate and private philanthropy, however, is increasing and offers many advantages over official aid. Examine in depth the advantages and disadvantages of philanthropic versus governmental aid and analyze the role of philanthropic institutitons play in influencing official aid.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9991  Summer Institute in Global Affairs  (0 Credits)  
<p>Increase your understanding of global affairs and explore international career paths by learning from experts in politics, economics, law, and international relations. This program covers the political, economic, social, and cultural issues that shape relations throughout the world. Gain insight into the work of the United Nations, specialized international agencies, private sector firms, and nongovernmental organizations through private briefings and site visits. Participate in a global crisis decision-making exercise involving interactive negotiation and crisis resolution.</p>
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9997  UN in Geneva Study Program  (0 Credits)  
Geneva, Switzerland is the European headquarters of the United Nations, the primary seat of several of its specialized and affiliated agencies, and the center of many of its global responsibilities. This unique study tour places you in the historic Palais des Nations, the setting for hundreds of year-round meetings and conferences, the original home of the League of Nations, and now a hub of international activity. Meet and be briefed by senior UN officials, diplomats, and key representatives of governments and nongovernmental organizations on such topics as human rights, refugees, peace and security, world health, world trade, development, HIV/AIDS, women and children, international labor issues, and humanitarian assistance. The program includes a tour of the International Committee of the Red Cross and its world-renowned museum; briefings at missions to the UN in Geneva; visits to specialized agencies such as the World Health Organization and International Labor Organization; and access to high-level diplomats and representatives.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
GLOB1-CE 9998  The United Nations' Role in the War on Terror: U.N. Sanctions and Counterterrorism  (0 Credits)  
Through the use of targeted sanctions and the institutionalization of a comprehensive counterterrorism strategy, the United Nations has developed innovative ways to tackle evolving terrorist threats. The recent 10-year anniversary of the establishment of the Security Council&#8217;s Counter-Terrorism Committee serves not only as a commemoration of how far the U.N. has come in leading the international community&#8217;s efforts to eradicate terrorism, but also as a reminder of the challenges that remain. Explore the U.N.&#8217;s multifaceted counterterrorism architecture, examine due process and implementation challenges that threaten the viability of U.N. sanctions, and evaluate the merits of multilateral approaches to countering terrorism and violent extremism.
Grading: SPS Non-Credit Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes