Economics (ECON-UH)

ECON-UH 1410EJ  Research Design, Fieldwork, and Data Analysis for Development Economics  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered January term  
Close to 1 billion of the world's population live on less than what is effectively 2 US dollars a day. A child born in Sub-Saharan Africa is nearly 10 times more likely to die as an infant than a child born in the United States, largely of biologically preventable illnesses. Nearly 70 percent of the world's poor aged 15 and over are illiterate. Are these facts necessary? What has and is being done to change them? Topics in development economics are concerned with the pursuit of understanding facts and questions like these. This is a challenging introductory course for college students who are motivated to learn more about what can be done in the fight against global poverty. Through a busy few weeks of immersive learning, students will achieve basic skill development in research design, fieldwork, and data analysis for development economics. Students should expect to conduct fieldwork in rural areas.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: African Studies Minor: Social Science Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: Behavioral Institutional Design Minor: Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Development Economic History Track
  • Bulletin Categories: Political Science: Methods
  • Bulletin Categories: SRPP: Methods Electives
  • Crosslisted with: African Studies
  • Crosslisted with: Behavioral Institutional Design
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  • Crosslisted with: Political Science Major: Social Science Required
  • Crosslisted with: Political Science
  • Crosslisted with: SRPP: Major Soc Sci Required
  • Crosslisted with: Social Research Public Policy
  
ECON-UH 1411JQ  On the Economics of Cities  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered January term  
On the Economics of Cities: Ever since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, what makes some nations rich and others poor has been a central question in economics and history. At the same time, besides the mystery of economic growth, there is the mystery of spatial inequality: why is inequality found at all spatial scales, from the international and regional to the urban and local? About 70% of the earth's land surface is inhabitable, but about 3% only is urban land, clearly indicating the staggering tendency of humans to cluster. The largest 681 metropolitan areas distributed over the globe house about 24% of the world's population but produce 60% of the global output. Spatial inequality is epitomized by the existence of cities that are characterized by high densities of activities and population. But why do people choose to live in big cities where they pay high rents and endure long commutes? Cities generally offer better amenities, as well as a wide range of local public goods. On top of that, firms in larger cities pay higher wages. But then, why would firms in big cities pay their employees these high wages? In sum, why do cities exist?
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Development Economic History Track
  • Bulletin Categories: Urbanization Courses
  • Bulletin Categories: Urbanization
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  • Crosslisted with: Urbanization Courses
  • Crosslisted with: Urbanization
  
ECON-UH 1550J  Euro-American Financial System in Crisis  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered January term  
Modern European and American finance has evolved into a highly liberalized, interconnected, and globalized system that depends on markets and banks as intermediaries between users and suppliers of capital. The system has recently suffered two extraordinary shocks - the collapse of the mortgage finance market and the "vicious downward cycle" caused by linkages between bank and sovereign creditworthiness. These shocks, which have thrown the Euro-American economies into a protracted Great Recession, threaten the euro and the European Union, and represent great challenges to US and European governments, financial institutions and their regulators. The German government, based in Berlin is a key decision maker in the efforts to stabilize the euro, the weaker Eurozone member countries and the European banking system, and the European Central Bank, another key player, is not far away in Frankfurt. This course provides a broad ranging exploration of these issues for students with only general knowledge of finance and economics.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Entrepreneurship Finance Track
  
ECON-UH 1701  Economics of Gender  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
The role of women in the economy changed drastically in the 20th century. Many women around the world enjoy unprecedented freedom to decide what to study, where to work, and when to have a family, nowadays. These changes coupled with the evidence of a persistent gap in the earnings of men and women around the world raise important questions about family planning, female participation in the labor force, and public policy. These questions are at the center of this course. That is, we will explore how men and women make decisions about work and family that have a long-lasting impact on their lives. Using insights from economic theory and empirical data - predominantly from Europe, the USA and the UAE- the course covers topics such as the different incentives for men and women to study and participate in the labor market, as well as explore the reasons behind gender differences in earnings and employment. Students will learn about trends in fertility and marriage rates, and discuss recent government policies aimed at combating discrimination, encouraging women to participate in the labor force, and achieving a better work-life balance.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: SOCSC-UH 1010Q.  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Labor Health Economics Track
  • Bulletin Categories: Political Science: Breadth Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: SRPP: Institutions Public Policy
  • Bulletin Categories: SRPP: Social Structure Global Processes
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  • Crosslisted with: Political Science Major: Social Science Required
  • Crosslisted with: Political Science
  • Crosslisted with: SRPP: Major Soc Sci Required
  • Crosslisted with: Social Research Public Policy
  
ECON-UH 2010  Intermediate Microeconomics  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
This course introduces the major concepts and tools of modern microeconomic analysis. Students will study the manner in which consumers, producers and resource owners, acting through markets, determine the prices and output of goods and the allocation of productive resources. Consumers and producers are viewed as agents with well-defined objectives, choosing optimally under constraints on their resources. The price mechanism is viewed as an institution that disseminates information to decision makers - firms and consumers - and coordinates their behavior. Students will study circumstances under which markets promote an efficient allocation of resources, as well as sources of market failure where the price mechanism can lead to inefficient outcomes.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: SOCSC-UH 1111 and either MATH-UH 1013Q or SOCSC-UH 1101.  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics Major: Required
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics
  
ECON-UH 2020  Data Analysis: Economics  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
Social Science research and policy analysis rely heavily on observational data. Students learn to analyze such data and apply appropriate statistical techniques to address various empirical questions. Topics include multivariate regression and classification analysis as well as time series modeling and forecasting. The course emphasizes applications of these techniques using statistical software.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: BOS: Methods and Analytics Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics Major: Required
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Data Science Economics Track
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics
  • Bulletin Categories: Political Science: Methods
  • Bulletin Categories: SRPP: Methods Electives
  • Crosslisted with: Business, Organizations, and Society
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  • Crosslisted with: Political Science Major: Social Science Required
  • Crosslisted with: Political Science
  • Crosslisted with: SRPP: Major Soc Sci Required
  • Crosslisted with: Social Research Public Policy
  
ECON-UH 2030  Intermediate Macroeconomics  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
Intermediate Macroeconomics addresses in depth four foundational aspects of macroeconomic theory and policy: (1) theories of exogenous and endogenous growth in per capita incomes; (2) theories of fluctuations in output, employment and other macroeconomic aggregates with a focus on policy and other economic stimuli that can lead to booms and recessions; (3) determinants of inflation including capacity constraints, money, credit and expectations; (4) the aims, objectives and tools of monetary and fiscal policies and their relationship with financial intermediation and its regulation. Throughout the course data will regularly be analyzed to critically assess the theoretical insights.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics Major: Required
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics
  
ECON-UH 2310EQ  Behavioral Economics  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
This course introduces students to the field of behavioral economics, which seeks to combine standard economic thinking with more psychologically-plausible assumptions about human behavior. This is accomplished by making nonstandard assumptions about human preferences, exploring nonstandard beliefs, and emphasizing the limitations of our decision-making faculties. Predictions about individual behavior are more accurate and the policies of governments are more effective when these more-realistic models are effectively used. The topics covered include, but are not restricted to, choice under uncertainty, overconfidence and competitiveness, stereotypes and discrimination, moral and social norms, and procrastination and intertemporal choice. Each topic is approached by examining evidence that is not easily explained by the canonical economic model and then asking how and why it can be better explained by making specific deviations from the standard rationality assumptions. Specific policy interventions that can be used to help people make better decisions will also be discussed.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: BOS: General Business Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: Behavioral Institutional Design Minor: Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Behavioral Experimental Track
  • Crosslisted with: Behavioral Institutional Design
  • Crosslisted with: Business, Organizations, and Society
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  
ECON-UH 2320E  Experimental Economics  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
As a methodological field within the discipline, experimental economics develops laboratory techniques (similar in spirit to those found in the 'hard sciences') in the pursuit of two broad ends: to empirically evaluate existing assumptions and theories of economic behavior and to 'wind tunnel' test new assumptions, theories and policies. In this course, students will learn how to marry theory with the economists' laboratory, how to interpret the results of experiments, how to advance economic thinking using those results and how this tool applies equally to individual, group, and aggregate economic behavior.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: Behavioral Institutional Design Minor: Required
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Behavioral Experimental Track
  • Bulletin Categories: Political Science: Breadth Electives
  • Crosslisted with: Behavioral Institutional Design
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  • Crosslisted with: Political Science Major: Social Science Required
  • Crosslisted with: Political Science
  
ECON-UH 2321J  Economic Rationality and Behavior  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered January term  
This class provides the insights and tools to understanding human behavior, the limits of human rationality and how public policies can be designed to improve well-being taking into account rationality and its limitations. The course will be based on readings from the empirical literature, showing empirical regularities in human behavior. Data analysis on various examples such as criminal activity, the determinants of car accidents, the role of television on the development of cognitive skills of kids or the role of public policies (education, development and health) will be used do draw first principles of human behavior. From these principles, it develops a theory of human interactions and develops welfare criteria to assess the efficiency and inefficiencies of these interactions and economic equilibria. It then studies various topics: the regulation of firms, the art market, bubbles, city development, discrimination. NOTE: This course is better suited for students having never studied economics before, but students with prior knowledge are also welcome.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Behavioral Experimental Track
  
ECON-UH 2322E  Neuropsychoeconomics  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
The course presents an introduction to new methods and techniques and recent results from the fields of Psychoeconomics and Neuroeconomics. We will discuss alternative models of decision making arising in psychology, as e.g. prospect theory or dual-process theories, and the process data on which they are based, as e.g. response times. Special emphasis will be placed on neuroscientific techniques as fMRI and the EEG. The discussion of the techniques will be focused on examples where they have been applied to specific microeconomic settings, ranging from intertemporal decision making to prosocial behavior. Other exemplary topics covered in the course include self-control depletion and the effects of time pressure and cognitive load.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: Behavioral Institutional Design Minor: Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Behavioral Experimental Track
  • Crosslisted with: Behavioral Institutional Design
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  
ECON-UH 2410  Development Economics  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
This course covers the roles of factor accumulation, technology, human capital and ideas in the growth process; the political economy of growth; the role of openness to international trade versus international trade barriers; and growth and income inequality. The course provides an overview of foreign aid in the economic development process and the policies of international institutions like the IMF and World Bank. The course also includes: the study of randomized experiments in evaluating aid projects and development interventions; rural land markets; credit markets in imperfect and fragmented capital markets; the household migration decision; and nutrition and fertility decisions.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Development Economic History Track
  • Bulletin Categories: Political Science: Breadth Electives
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  • Crosslisted with: Political Science Major: Social Science Required
  • Crosslisted with: Political Science
  
ECON-UH 2411  Technology and Economic Development: Markets and Networks  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
This course will cover topics on the interface between economics and computer science, with special emphasis on issues of importance to economically developing regions. Students will work in teams to tackle real-world and interdisciplinary problems. Students will address questions of markets and economic development using Information and Communications Technologies for Development (ICTD) techniques in the context of development.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: BOS: General Business Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Development Economic History Track
  • Crosslisted with: Business, Organizations, and Society
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  
ECON-UH 2451X  Economic History of the Middle East  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
The Middle East was the cradle of civilization and one of the most vibrant regions of the world for thousands of years. Since the Middle Ages, however, it has been surpassed by Europe in economic performance. This course explores this reversal in fortune. Was it due to culture, religion, law, geography, agrarian structure, globalization, or state policy? What attempts have been made to catch up with the West? Which have been successful? How has the history of the Near East compared to that of other parts of the world and what light do those comparisons shed on the region's experience?
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: SOCSC-UH 1111.  
  • Bulletin Categories: Arab Crossroads Studies: Society Politics
  • Bulletin Categories: BOS: General Business Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Development Economic History Track
  • Bulletin Categories: History: Mediterranean Zone Electives
  • Crosslisted with: Arab Crossroads Studies Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Arab Crossroads Studies
  • Crosslisted with: Business, Organizations, and Society
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  • Crosslisted with: History: Major Required
  • Crosslisted with: History
  
ECON-UH 2502J  Household Finance  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered January term  
Household Finance is the field of study of how individuals make their financial decisions: how they choose a mortgage to buy a house, how they decide to invest their savings, how much insurance coverage they want to undertake, whether households have the financial capabilities to make sound decisions and how they do when confronted with financial markets and individuals. This course reviews the academic literature on households' financial decisions, focusing on the determinants of investors' financial choices. It will show how people's preferences and attitudes towards risk, regret and ambiguity affect their choices and how these can be measured. The course emphasizes the role of informal institutions - such as trust and social capital - in shaping the adoption of financial instruments and the functioning of retail financial markets.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Entrepreneurship Finance Track
  
ECON-UH 2510  Foundations of Financial Markets  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
This course offers a rigorous examination of the basic concepts and tools of modern finance. Students are introduced to cash flow analysis and present value, as well as basic concepts of return and risk, in order to understand how financial markets work and how financial instruments are valued. These instruments, including equities, fixed income securities, options, and other derivative securities, become vehicles for exploring various financial markets and their utilization by managers in different kinds of financial institutions to enhance return and manage risk.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: BOS: Business Foundations Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics Finance Specialization: Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Entrepreneurship Finance Track
  • Crosslisted with: Business, Organizations, and Society
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  
ECON-UH 2511  Financial Systems  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Recent global financial turbulence has demonstrated both how important the financial system is to the world economy and how complex it is. Financial systems are centered on key institutions, instruments and markets. But they also involve governments, public policy and regulation. They span the globe from the US, the EU, Japan, Russia, China and the Emerging Markets. In critical ways, country-­‐level financial architectures are integrating to form a more seamless, high-­‐performance whole. This is good for efficiency, innovation and growth, yet it also amplifies problems during times of crisis.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: SOCSC-UH 1111.  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics Finance Specialization: Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Entrepreneurship Finance Track
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  
ECON-UH 2512  FinTech Innovation: Finance, Technology, Regulation  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
FinTech innovation is the hottest topic in Financial Services and touches all aspects of industry transformation. Digitizing a financial institution or competing with established players requires an interdisciplinary approach. For FinTech entrepreneurs and investors to be capable of creating or evaluating innovative business models that can generate revenues they need to possess knowledge on 3 key areas: Finance (quantitative methods and behavioral finance), Technology (artificial intelligence, blockchain, API) and Regulation (MIFID2, PSD2, GRDP). In this course we will cover these key three areas and study their implications for FinTech founders and investors, established financial institutions and regulators.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: BOS: General Business Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics Finance Specialization: Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Breadth Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Entrepreneurship Finance Track
  • Bulletin Categories: Legal Studies: Electives
  • Crosslisted with: Business, Organizations, and Society
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  • Crosslisted with: Legal Studies
  • Crosslisted with: Pre-Professional: Law
  
ECON-UH 2513J  Social Entrepreneurship for Economic Development (SEED): India  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered January term  
Social Entrepreneurship for Economic Development (SEED): India. The development of homegrown, community-owned business is a critical element for the economic success of any society, and yet it is not a major area of focus for development institutions and nonprofits in their work with vulnerable populations around the world. Social Entrepreneurship for Economic Development (SEED), India is a unique educational experience that will combine business theory and experiential learning in an effort to harnesses the talents of low-income populations to generate sustainable businesses. The objectives are to (1) develop prototypes or minimum viable products that can help solve a social need in a rural community in India, and, with this foundation, (2) develop an entrepreneurship module for the volunteer staff of one of India's leading education-oriented nonprofits, Educate Girls. SEED will also build on the experiences of NYU's Stern International Volunteers (Ghana) course, which has helped incubate several community-owned businesses and educational initiatives in rural Ghana.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Breadth Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Entrepreneurship Finance Track
  • Bulletin Categories: Leadership Social Entrepreneurship
  • Bulletin Categories: Pre-Professional: Leadership Social Entrepreneur
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  • Crosslisted with: Leadership Social Entrepreneurship
  • Crosslisted with: Pre-Professional: Leadership Social Entrepreneur
  
ECON-UH 2514  Economics of Sovereign Wealth Funds  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
Sovereign wealth funds (SWFs) are key actors in the global financial landscape of the twenty-first century. These funds manage assets worth more than 7 trillion of US dollars and have grown more rapidly than any other class of large global investors - and thus appear set to strongly influence international investing for the foreseeable future. Yet, in spite of their size and relevance, SWFs are still quite poorly understood. What explains their momentous rise? What is the economic rationale for their establishment? How do they differ from other global institutional investors? Which economic, institutional, and governance challenges to they face? Against this backdrop, this course will introduce the student to the economic principles of sovereign investing and to key, selected problems and issues in sovereign wealth management in the international context and with special reference to the impact COVID-19 crisis in the UAE, home of some of the leading SWFs.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Entrepreneurship Finance Track
  
ECON-UH 2610  International Economics  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
Examining both macro and micro aspects of the globalization of world economies, this course begins with the fundamentals of trade: comparative advantage, gains from trade, the price of factors of production, and the implications of labor and capital mobility. The second part of the course covers the role of money and finance in global economic activity. Topics include: the roles of the exchange rate; current and capital accounts as key variables in international economic relations; purchasing power parity and interest rate parity; the international effects of macro policy and government exchange rate policies; the role of oil exports in the world economy; and the role of international economic organizations such as the International Monetary Fund and the World Trade Organization.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: SOCSC-UH 1111.  
  • Bulletin Categories: BOS: General Business Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Global Macroeconomics Track
  • Crosslisted with: Business, Organizations, and Society
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  
ECON-UH 2620J  Understanding Financial Crises  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered January term  
The purpose of this course is to understand the key facts and basic mechanisms concerning financial crises and related topics. The course will first begin by studying empirical evidence about financial crises as well as the basic crisis mechanisms (bank runs, sovereign default decision, currency collapse). The empirical facts will provide a perspective on the recurrence of different types of financial crises (banking crises, currency crises, and sovereign debt crises). Students will study their causes, their resolutions, and their long-run consequences. The crisis mechanisms will be introduced through very simple canonical models, with emphasis on intuition and insight over model technicalities. Once these foundations are in place, the course will open up on a series of topics with mixed themes such as crises and long run growth; inequality and crises; crises, stabilization and reforms. An in-depth study of major crises episodes, such as the Great Depression, the US Financial Crises of 2007-2008, and the Euro Crisis will be offered.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: SOCSC-UH 1111.  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics Finance Specialization: Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Global Macroeconomics Track
  
ECON-UH 2621J  Crises, Policies and their Aftermath  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered January term  
The purpose of this course is to review the key facts and understand the mechanisms at work before, during and after financial crises. Located in Paris, a specific focus will be given to European developments in the wake of the sovereign crisis. The course will be divided into two parts. It will start by looking at the main empirical evidence about financial crises. This evidence will be used to establish a "typology" around the canonical models of bank runs, sovereign defaults, and currency collapses. These empirical facts and the derived typology will equip students with the tools to analyze the causes of crises, the policy responses that they have triggered, and their long-run economic and financial consequences.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: ECON-UH 1112 or SOCSC-UH 1011.  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics Finance Specialization: Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Global Macroeconomics Track
  
ECON-UH 2710  Labor Economics  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This class will study the various ways that workers and firms interact in labor markets. What factors determine how much labor individuals supply to the market? What determines labor demand by firms? How do firms design contracts to provide the right incentives to their workers? What determines wage inequality in the economy? What can insights from labor economics contribute to debates surrounding policies such as immigration reform, welfare reform, and income taxation? The class will expose students to the basic theoretical models used by economists to tackle these issues. Students will also survey evidence from empirical studies on these topics.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Labor Health Economics Track
  
ECON-UH 2711  Health Economics  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course will focus on the application of economic principles to examine issues in health economics. The first part of the course will focus on theoretical models of supply and demand for health and health care, and the transformation of health care into health. We will then apply these models to understand how health insurance markets work, the importance of externalities in health and health care, the interaction between markets for health and labor, and the role of government intervention in health care provision. We will also discuss key characteristics of current health care programs in the United States and elsewhere. Overall, this course will be a combination of discussion of important issues in health care, learning models that are helpful in explaining various aspects of health care and understanding what is known empirically. By the end of the course, students should be able to use economic reasoning to think critically about health-related policy issues.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: SOCSC-UH 1010Q, SOCSC-UH 1111.  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Labor Health Economics Track
  
ECON-UH 2920  Individual Rationality & Collective Action  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
How do individuals make decisions? What does it mean to be rational? How do rational individuals behave collectively? Can collective action be efficient? How stable are preferences? This course explores the extent, and limitations, of rationality in individual and collective decision making - both from a positive and normative perspective. It describes and characterizes the interaction between individual and collective choices on the market place and in firms, especially when markets fail. It investigates the interplay between the market mechanism and the democratic principle in the economy. The course introduces fundamental concepts, methods and paradigms of decision theory, general equilibrium theory and social choice theory. These are illustrated through short cases borrowed from the current economic, political and business scene. It examines how these tools might lead us to make better decisions; both as individuals or members of groups, and enables a better understanding of the dynamics of collective action.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: ECON-UH 2010.  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Economic Theory Track
  
ECON-UH 2921  Law and Economics  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course introduces students to economic thinking about legal topics. The first half focus on property rights and how legal institutions have evolved to settle disputes between property owners and allocate risk between different agents. Historical court cases from the British and American common law system will be used to aid in this discussion. The second half of the course examines law as a system of incentives for promoting pro-social behavior. Participants will expand their analysis to civil law as practiced in much of the world, and compare it with the theory built from the common law experience to see which lessons still apply. The core question participants will be asked to answer is "when is the law efficient?"
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: SOCSC-UH 1111.  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Economic Theory Track
  • Bulletin Categories: Legal Studies: Electives
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  • Crosslisted with: Legal Studies
  • Crosslisted with: Pre-Professional: Law
  
ECON-UH 2922  Industrial Organization  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
Industrial Organization is a branch of applied microeconomics that studies a wide range of issues including market competition, firms' strategic behaviors, effects of firms' decisions on market outcomes (like prices, quantities, the type of products offered, location, innovation and social welfare) and their feedback effects on market structure, anti-competitive practices and regulatory interventions. In particular, Industrial Organization is concerned with the way firms compete with each other, with the way firms acquire and maintain market power, with the way public policies are used to address undesirable implications of market power. This course introduces the students to a range of issues in the field of Industrial Organization with the goal to understand different forms of market structures, of firms' strategic decisions and of regulatory and competition policies. The course combines theoretical concepts and basic models with some noteworthy real-world applications; it also briefly considers some competition laws and regulatory policies. It builds on concepts and methodologies from microeconomics and game theory.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: ECON-UH 2010 (or BUSOR-UH 2006), and MATH-UH 1013Q.  
  • Bulletin Categories: BOS: General Business Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Economic Theory Track
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Entrepreneurship Finance Track
  • Crosslisted with: Business, Organizations, and Society
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  
ECON-UH 3010  Economics of Imperfect Markets  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
The market is the main institution for the allocation of economic resources. It operates through a price mechanism that disseminates information to decision-makers – firms, consumers, and regulators – and coordinates their behavior. When it works well, it promotes an efficient allocation of resources. But markets can suffer from several imperfections: some markets can be missing, as for most externalities; they can be incomplete, for example in the financial sector; agents can be price-makers or hide information, and therefore prevent competition from promoting efficiency. The course will review in depth most of the sources of market failures and their consequences.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics Major: Required
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics
  
ECON-UH 3030  Economic Growth  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
This course introduces students to the modern analysis of economic growth. This branch of macroeconomics is concerned with questions such as: What explains the considerable growth in incomes per capita that advanced economies have experienced since the late eighteenth century? Why are some countries so much richer than others? Will poor countries close the gap with rich countries? What is the driving force of growth in the long run? Are the benefits of growth equally shared between different social classes? How does government policy affect growth? How do the underlying characteristics of an economy - such as its institutions, skill distribution, and demographic trends - affect its growth rate?
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics Major: Required
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics
  
ECON-UH 3210  Quantitative Methods and Program Evaluation  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to an applied, intermediate level of quantitative and econometric analysis. The first part of the course will focus on multiple regression analysis. The second part covers experimental and non-experimental methods that are often used in empirical research and evaluation. The course is intended to give students hands-on experience with real data and real analysis, helping students become sophisticated consumers of relatively advanced statistical techniques, as well as to provide students practical knowledge to conduct their own empirical analysis. Many applications will use data from developing countries.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Data Science Economics Track
  • Bulletin Categories: Political Science: Methods Electives (pre-2017)
  • Bulletin Categories: Political Science: Methods
  • Bulletin Categories: SRPP: Methods Electives
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  • Crosslisted with: Political Science Major: Social Science Required
  • Crosslisted with: Political Science
  • Crosslisted with: SRPP: Major Soc Sci Required
  • Crosslisted with: Social Research Public Policy
  
ECON-UH 3300  Topics in Behavioral and Experimental Economics  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
In this course students work through academic research papers in the area that is closely connected to the research interests of the professor. One of the outcomes is a research proposal that each student prepares. Students can take multiple versions of this course for credit.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: ECON-UH 2320 or ECON-UH 2310EQ.  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Behavioral Experimental Track
  
ECON-UH 3310EJ  Economic Decisions and the Brain  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
What drives economic decisions? How much risk should you accept, how much money should you save, how should you negotiate with others? Can you trust your gut? Modern research in economics has clearly shown that humans are not fully rational, impulse-free decision makers. But how are decisions actually made then, and how can we improve them? This course will review experimental evidence on the many mistakes and biases that humans fall prey to and look at evidence from psychology and neuroscience illustrating the origins of those mistakes. We will use that evidence to illustrate models of decision making arising from both economics and psychology (for example, expected utility theory vs. prospect theory, exponential discounting vs. hyperbolic discounting). Along the way, we will discuss related evidence from brain scanning and imaging studies and process data (response times, eye tracking) and what they have to say about economic decisions.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Behavioral Experimental Track
  
ECON-UH 3400  Topics in Development and Economic History  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
In this course students work through academic research papers in the area that is closely connected to the research interests of the professor. One of the outcomes is a research proposal that each student prepares. Students can take multiple versions of this course for credit.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: SOCSC-UH 3220.  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Development Economic History Track
  
ECON-UH 3410  Development and Public Policy  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course will cover the international aspects of contemporary economic development and poverty reduction in developing countries, including the various dimensions of globalization (trade, migration, capital movements, knowledge transfer, global public goods ...), the potential conflicts of interest between developing and developed countries, the need for global governance and the role of international organizations.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: ECON-UH 2030.  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Development Economic History Track
  
ECON-UH 3450  A History of the Modern World Economy  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
The modern world economy is marked by large disparities in incomes between countries. Why are some countries rich, while others are poor? This course explores the origins of this "Great Divergence" in living standards between countries, focusing on the way in which geography, colonialism, culture, and globalization have spurred or hindered economic development across the globe.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: ECON-UH 2020 or POLSC-UH 2211.  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Development Economic History Track
  • Bulletin Categories: Political Science: Breadth Electives
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  • Crosslisted with: Political Science Major: Social Science Required
  • Crosslisted with: Political Science
  
ECON-UH 3460  Poverty  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
International organizations today define poverty as having to live with less than USD 1.90 a day at the prices observed in advanced countries. With such a definition, there are today a little less than 1 billion poor people in the world, or 13 percent of the global population. With the same definition, there were more than 90 per cent two centuries ago. This seems indeed a huge progress. Yet, there are serious questions behind that definition and those figures. Why USD 1.90 a day? Where does this figure come from? How satisfactory is a definition of poverty that implies that there is practically no poor person in the United States or Europe today? Should poverty be measured with a pure monetary metric? How should the subjective and social aspect of poverty be taken into account? Alternative definitions often paint a much less optimistic landscape, with poverty diminishing much more slowly and in some cases not at all. More fundamentally, how is it the case that, even with the 1.90 USD a day definition, there still are countries today where about half the population is below that level? What are the obstacles these countries face in trying to access a higher standard of living?
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Development Economic History Track
  • Bulletin Categories: Political Science: Breadth Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: SRPP: Institutions Public Policy
  • Bulletin Categories: SRPP: Social Structure Global Processes
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  • Crosslisted with: Political Science Major: Social Science Required
  • Crosslisted with: Political Science
  • Crosslisted with: SRPP: Major Soc Sci Required
  • Crosslisted with: Social Research Public Policy
  
ECON-UH 3500  Topics in Entrepreneurship and Finance  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
In this course students work through academic research papers in the area that is closely connected to the research interests of the professor. One of the outcomes is a research proposal that each student prepares. Students can take multiple versions of this course for credit.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: SOCSC-UH 3220.  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Entrepreneurship Finance Track
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  
ECON-UH 3511X  Islamic Economics and Finance  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course provides a foundational understanding of the principles of Islamic economics and mode, products and procedures of Islamic finance. This course familiarizes students with the roles and functionalities of Islamic finance in the context of the financial services industry today.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: ECON-UH 2510.  
  • Bulletin Categories: Arab Crossroads Studies: Society Politics
  • Bulletin Categories: BOS: General Business Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Entrepreneurship Finance Track
  • Bulletin Categories: Legal Studies: Electives
  • Crosslisted with: Arab Crossroads Studies Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Arab Crossroads Studies
  • Crosslisted with: Business, Organizations, and Society
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  • Crosslisted with: Legal Studies
  • Crosslisted with: Pre-Professional: Law
  
ECON-UH 3512  Global Asset Allocation  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
This course analyzes the drivers of asset prices and explains how they impact the investment decision process in diversified global multi-asset portfolios. The students will learn to distinguish between macro-economic fundamentals, technical parameters and valuation parameters and how the overall assessment of these indicators impacts the investment decisions. The course will cover portfolio optimization as well as techniques of risk management based on the utilization of derivative instruments. The students will subsequently analyze how specific macro-economic drivers have historically had differentiated impacts across advanced, emerging and GCC markets, observing market movements across risk-on- and risk-off moments (financial crises). Equipped with the tools of asset allocation in global multi-asset portfolios, students will finally use this historical empirical analysis as a basis for identifying global and local risk factors in today's market context, and discuss ways of how to protect portfolios accordingly. This will be done with a special focus on GCC and Emerging Markets.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Entrepreneurship Finance Track
  
ECON-UH 3513  Advanced Investments  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
This course presents classical and modern ideas of finance with an applied focus. Students will master the analytic tools and the financial theory for making smart investments by using stocks and bonds but will also get their hands dirty with data. The course starts with an overview of important methods from mathematics and statistics, software tools and financial data. It continues with the pricing of bonds and other fixed-income instruments, discusses the risks associated with fixed-income investments, demonstrates the methods to derive zero-coupon yield curves and shows how to hedge interest rate risk. The course then deals with stocks and covers the following topics: Predictability of stock returns, The cross-section of stock returns, Asset pricing theory (utility, discount factors, expected returns, CAPM, ICAPM, APT), Empirical asset pricing methods (time-series predictive regressions, cross-sectional Fama-MacBeth as well as Fama and French regressions). We also study the performance of Mutual funds and Hedge funds. The final session of the course will be devoted to answering questions related to this course that are frequently asked in the job interviews in investment banks.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: ECON-UH 2020 or SOCSC-UH 3220.  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics Finance Specialization: Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Entrepreneurship Finance Track
  
ECON-UH 3520  Corporate Finance  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
This course introduces the student to selected problems and issues in financial management and corporate financial policy. Topics include: capital budgeting (strategy and techniques associated with the analysis and selection of capital projects, financial forecasting, and financial planning) and corporate finance (the cost of capital and issues associated with raising capital, mergers and acquisitions decisions, corporate bankruptcy, managerial control, and compensation strategies). Problem sets and case studies are integral parts of this course.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: ECON-UH 2510.  
  • Bulletin Categories: BOS: General Business Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics Finance Specialization: Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Entrepreneurship Finance Track
  • Crosslisted with: Business, Organizations, and Society
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  
ECON-UH 3521  Asset Pricing and Derivatives  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
This course is a strong introduction to the theoretical and practical aspects of financial derivatives including Futures, Options and Swaps. Derivatives have recorded huge growth due to their hedging, speculative and bona fide applications and due to their profound effects in times of crisis. Derivatives are quantitative in nature; however, they also relate to theoretical knowledge and intuitive judgment in structuring and real-life applications. This course will use the quantitative tools learned as a prerequisite. The goal is to develop an understanding of how derivative securities work (pricing, trading, marking to market, hedging…), grow intuition on their application and expand on their basics to engineer innovative and exotic securities that allow tailoring the amount and kind of risk, be it risk associated with changes in interest rates, exchange rates, stock prices, commodity prices, inflation, weather, etc. The course will also explore the emergence of derivatives market and its applications in the local economy.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: ECON-UH 2510 and MATH-UH 1021.  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Entrepreneurship Finance Track
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  
ECON-UH 3522  Corporate Governance  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
What do the disastrous IPO of WeWork, the multi-billion 1Malaysia Development Board scandal, and the recent Wirecard AG dramatic bankruptcy have in common? They are all corporate governance failures. Indeed, firms of all stripes are plagued by agency problems whereby performance is threatened by moral hazard, misaligned incentives, and unethical behavior. Corporate governance is the broad set of economic institutions and contractual arrangements designed to balance the conflicting interests among firm's stakeholders, allowing them to get a fair return from their investment. In this course, using the standard tools from microeconomics and finance the student will understand the agency costs associated with different corporate financing choices and the suitable mechanisms to mitigate them. The COVID-19 crisis has sparked the debate whether companies should pursue wider social objectives, embracing purpose rather than profit. The course will also expose the student to the frontier of corporate social responsibility, addressing how companies can foster the transition to a more sustainable, equitable, and socially resilient economic paradigm.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics Finance Specialization: Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Economic Theory Track
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  
ECON-UH 3600  Topics in International and Macroeconomics  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
In this course students work through academic research papers in the area that is closely connected to the research interests of the professor. One of the outcomes is a research proposal that each student prepares. Students can take multiple versions of this course for credit.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Global Macroeconomics Track
  
ECON-UH 3630  Public Economics  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
This course is about the economic activities of government, largely revenue raising and spending, in a global context. The course considers market failures; the evaluation of public expenditures; and the incidence, efficiency, and effects of various taxes. The primary purpose is to use economic tools (mainly microeconomic) to study the impact of government policy on the distribution of resources. Topics include: welfare economics; public goods and externalities; public choice; important issues of government expenditure, taxation, and activity (e.g., international public goods and institutions, tax competition and coordination, education, social security and health care); fiscal federalism (including European integration); and mechanisms of political influence (e.g. elections and lobbying).
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Global Macroeconomics Track
  
ECON-UH 3640  Monetary Economics and Policy  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Central Banks across the world are tasked with maintaining price stability and possibly consider economic growth as a secondary objective, but why do independent central banks exist? What are the many roles modern Central Banks must satisfy? Why do people hold cash and are blockchain technologies going to change the way people trade? What are considerations for stabilization policies and why can economies typically not achieve full employment and zero inflation? What are optimal currency areas and why does monetary policy have to consider fiscal policy?
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Global Macroeconomics Track
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  
ECON-UH 3710  Economics of Education  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course will study the Economics of Education. This is an important area of investigation both because of its inherent interest to all of us involved in education and for its policy relevance. The course will use the tools of microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics that you have accumulated over your undergraduate studies. Students will refresh these tools as part of the lectures. The course is organized around traditional economic themes of demand, supply, equilibrium and government policy.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Labor Health Economics Track
  • Bulletin Categories: Education
  • Bulletin Categories: Pre-Professional: Education
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  • Crosslisted with: Education
  • Crosslisted with: Pre-Professional: Education
  
ECON-UH 3900  Topics in Economic Theory  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
In this course students work through academic research papers in the area that is closely connected to the research interests of the professor. One of the outcomes is a research proposal that each student prepares. Students can take multiple versions of this course for credit.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: SOCSC-UH 3220.  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Economic Theory Track
  
ECON-UH 3910  Advanced Microeconomics  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
Building on the foundations laid down in courses in Microeconomics at the intermediate level, this course provides a thorough treatment of some more advanced questions. The course starts with a careful study of the functioning of markets, culminating with the first and second theorem of welfare economics. The next topics cover an introduction to strategic behavior and game theory, and subsequently a study of market failures under adverse selection and moral hazard. This course involves a more formal analysis than that used in Intermediate Microeconomics. The course is mathematical, and at times proof-oriented. Students should be familiar and comfortable with multivariable calculus and basic linear algebra.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: ECON-UH 2010 and MATH-UH 1021, or consent by Program Head.  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Economic Theory Track
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  
ECON-UH 3911  De Gustibus Non est Disputandum  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
So called "non-economic" aspects like social interactions, trust, solidarity, fairness, emotions or cultural and social norms become increasingly acknowledged in various important economic and social policy areas like crime, ethnic conflicts, gender, the welfare state and economic development, The purpose of this course is to introduce the basic tools of microeconomic analysis and other fields (sociobiology, evolutionary anthropology, network theory, population dynamics) to such issues, emphasizing the role of endogenous preferences, culture, social norms and social interactions and their implications for markets, communities and institutions.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Economic Theory Track
  
ECON-UH 3912  Economics of Networks  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
Our opportunities and our choices are shaped by our connections. The awareness that connections matter leads us to invest in them. And these investments give rise to networks of friendship, the World Wide Web, supply chains, research alliances, transport links, and many other networks which we see around us. These observations have inspired an exciting new research program which examines the origins and the implications of networks. The lectures in this course provide a rigorous introduction to this research.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
Prerequisites: ECON-UH 2010 and MATH-UH 1021.  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Economic Theory Track
  • Bulletin Categories: Political Science: Methods
  • Bulletin Categories: SRPP: Methods Electives
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  • Crosslisted with: Political Science Major: Social Science Required
  • Crosslisted with: Political Science
  • Crosslisted with: SRPP: Major Soc Sci Required
  • Crosslisted with: Social Research Public Policy
  
ECON-UH 3913  Market Design  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
Traditional economics studies how markets price and allocate scarce resources, and how prices adjusts to equalize supply and demand. While markets may work well, there are many cases where the market mechanism fails and intervention is required. Worse, there are also cases where prices and, and hence money transfers, cannot be used to properly allocate resources. Economists are more and more involved in designing markets or institutions. Examples abound nowadays. For institutions where money transfers are possible, economists have been at the forefront of the design of auction mechanisms -e.g. to sell radio spectrum, diamonds, electricity etc. For cases where money transfers are not possible, economists have designed market-like mechanisms to allocate resources -e.g. assigning students to schools, assigning organ transplants such as kidneys, assigning seats to courses in college. The course will illustrate how microeconomic theory is used effectively and practically to solve important resource allocation problems, in instances where there were no good solutions prior to the microeconomist' help.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: ECON-UH 2010.  
  • Bulletin Categories: BOS: General Business Electives
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Economic Theory Track
  • Crosslisted with: Business, Organizations, and Society
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  
ECON-UH 3920J  Collective Welfare and Distributive Justice  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered January term  
This course explores the contribution of macroeconomic analysis to the normative issues surrounding the design of collective decision processes (voting rules, bargaining protocols), and the fair distribution and exploitation of scarce resources through prices or other market mechanisms. Attention is on the rigorous modeling of individual and collective welfare, and the logical difficulties of combining economic efficiency with the requirements of end-state and procedural justice. Applications include the Gini and other inequality indices, the Borda and Condorcet voting rules, the design of tax schedules, fair division of an inheritance, overcoming the tragedy of the commons, and more.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: ECON-UH 2010.  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Economic Theory Track
  
ECON-UH 3940  Advanced Macroeconomics  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
This course provides a formal study of aggregate, dynamic, stochastic, and economic analysis, with attention paid first to the determination of the level of income, employment, and inflation. Next, the class will examine theories and the policies associated with inflation and hyperinflation, entitlement reforms, and the formation of optimal monetary and fiscal policies. Throughout the course modern computational methods will be introduced and applied to solve economic models. We review the main tools and concepts of modern macro: OLG (Over-lapping Generation Models), Ramsey Model, Infinite Horizon Models, Bubbles, Market Frictions in Macroeconomic Models, Optimal Taxation, RBC (Real Business Cycles), DSGE (Dynamic Stochastic Growth Equilibrium) and Heterogeneous Agent Models.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: ECON-UH 3910 and SOCSC-UH 3220.  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Economic Theory Track
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Global Macroeconomics Track
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  
ECON-UH 4000  Economic Policy  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
Economic policy may be seen as the ultimate goal of economic analysis. How to choose between alternative economic courses in some specific area or at the macroeconomic level? How to tradeoff one policy objective, e.g. equity, versus another, e. g, efficiency? How to take into account political constraints while looking for socially optimal policies? Such is the nature of the questions to be handled in this course, which may be taken as the natural culmination of an economic curriculum. Its aim is to make students familiar with the main contemporary issues in economic policy at national level and to equip them with the analytical instruments to understand what is at stake in policy debates around the world and, ultimately, to form one's opinion about what should be done in particular areas. The course will deal with economic policy issues as applicable to any country, even though special attention will be given to emerging and developing countries. As far as possible, it will also systematically emphasize the distributional consequences of policies and consequent political economy dimension? It will not deal with multilateral issues like trade, migration or environment.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics Major: Required
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics
  • Bulletin Categories: Political Science: Breadth Electives
  • Crosslisted with: Economics Major: Required
  • Crosslisted with: Economics
  • Crosslisted with: Political Science Major: Social Science Required
  • Crosslisted with: Political Science
  
ECON-UH 4020  Capstone Seminar  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
The Capstone is a year-long project that students work on in their senior year of the Economics major, culminating in the submission of a Capstone thesis at the end of the Spring semester. The Capstone provides an opportunity for students to gain first-hand experience of economic research: • Choosing a research topic • Formulating a research question and hypotheses • Evaluating related literature • Formulating a research design • Conducting an empirical/experimental/theoretical analysis • Presenting findings to peers and specialists • Writing a research paper The Capstone seminar provides a forum to guide and advise students as they work on their Economics Capstone projects. At the end of the Fall, students submit a detailed project proposal and present in a Course Capstone Seminar ECON-UH 4020 Conveners David Blakeslee, Jean Imbs, Samreen Malik, Maximilian Mihm, Nikos Nikiforakis Term Fall 2023/ Spring 2024 Class Days Wednesday Class Times 3:35 – 6:15pm Class Locations: TBA Prerequisites: Senior standing, any ECON-UH 3xxx course and SOCSCUH 3220 Cross-lists: Majors > Economics Credits 4 for Fall and 4 for Spring “work-in-progress” event. In the Spring, students give a formal presentation of their work to gain practice communicating their ideas and answering questions about their work. At the end of the Spring semester, students submit a final thesis.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Capstone
  
ECON-UH 4099  Capstone Project  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
The sequel to the Capstone seminar is designed to conclude the capstone experience. Students work closely with faculty and fellow students to complete their senior theses.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: ECON-UH 4020.  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Capstone
  
ECON-UH 4210  Advanced Econometrics  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
The course presents advanced econometric methods for cross-sectional, time series and panel data. It introduces estimation methods such as Maximum Likelihood and Generalized Method of Moments for univariate and multivariate linear and nonlinear micro-econometric models, including discrete choice, censored regression and sample selection models. Attention is next turned to time series models, such as stationary ARMA and autoregressive distributed lag models with dynamic causal effects, and issues that arise when nonstationarity is present, such as structural breaks, trends, unit roots and cointegration. The course proceeds to introduce static and dynamic panel data models along with appropriate methodology such as fixed and random effects. It finally considers methods for high-dimensional ("big") data, such as regularization, principal component and factor analysis, and offers an introduction to non-parametric estimation. The students will apply the methods to real data using appropriate econometric packages such as STATA and R.
Grading: Ugrd Abu Dhabi Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: SOCSC-UH 3220.  
  • Bulletin Categories: Economics: Data Science Economics Track