Cinema Studies (CINE-GT)

CINE-GT 1010  Film Form/Film Sense: Industries & Aesthetics  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
This core course introduces the methods and areas of study in the Cinema Studies MA program. In keeping with the department's evolving profile, we'll also learn about research idioms that blend theory and practice, such as documentary, data visualization, and curation. The course is divided into modules that reflect this range of possibilities. Assignments comprise both written and practical projects and will involve some group/collaborative work.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1015  Film History/Historiog  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
This course examines the ways in which the history of film has been conceptualized, written, documented, researched, and revised. Readings include theoretical considerations of historiography, methodological approaches, practical guides to conducting research, and a variety of essays from the field of cinema and media history and related disciplines. We analyze social, cultural, aesthetic, economic, ideological, and technological histories of cinema. How do we frame questions about film and the historical past that are substantial, answerable, and logically sound? What evidence might help answer these questions? How should we thereby write historical analyses that answer questions posed? We will not attempt to survey the entire history of cinema. In roughly chronological sequence, we will consider particular aspects of that history: “early cinema,” “classical Hollywood cinema,” social history and exhibition, nonfiction and nontheatrical traditions, and the web-based media that cause us to reconsider what cinema is and was. This eclectic approach is indicative of the recent forms that film history has taken: de-centering Hollywood and feature films, rediscovering neglected archives, seeking “lost” works, moving past film specificity to historicize all moving images and sounds as a form of media archaeology.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1020  Film Theory  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
This course closely examines a variety of theoretical writings concerned with aesthetic, sociocultural, and psychological aspects of the cinematic medium. Theoretical frameworks are approached thematically, rather than chronologically, in order to formulate new conceptual connections between different modes of cinematic inquiry. The course uses the innovative organizational structure of Thomas Elsaesser and Malte Hagener’s Film Theory: An Introduction Through the Senses to address the multisensory relationship between spectators and cinema. Sound, sight, touch, smell and taste provide a way to access and compare theories ranging from classical to digital, and to explore areas that have been marginalized from overarching canons of film analysis. Approaching film theory through the senses opens up new ways of thinking about the screen-spectator relationship as the course moves from “external” to “internal” [cognitive/mnemonic] associations. Students will study the writing of classical theorists such as Eisenstein, Metz and Bazin, as well as contemporary thinkers such as Sobchack, Mayne, and Friedberg. Questions addressed range from the nature of cinematic representation and its relationship to other forms of cultural expression, to issues of theorizing film spectatorship. Theory will also be studied alongside examples from popular culture, digital contexts, and contemporary media in order to interrogate certain ideas about cinema and spectatorship that persist despite the medium’s material and technical changes. By the end of the semester, students will acquire the critical skills to apply a broad range of analytical perspectives to films and other media.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1025  Topics in Media & Cultural Studies  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered all terms  
Topics vary per semester. Check departmental listings.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1026  Television: History and Culture  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
This M.A. core course examines the background, context, and history of television with an initial emphasis on broadcast and digital eras in the U.S., then expansion into case studies of international television. The approach is comparative, with a focus on television as cultural, social, and aesthetic formation. Topics include histories of technology, economics of media institutions, local and networked intersectional politics, audiences and reception, and questions of representation. We will also pay particular attention to methods and modes of historiography, especially in light of emerging opportunities for online access and digital research tools.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1104  Hist Italian Film II  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Documentary Italian Style Non-fiction films have been made in Italy since the beginnings of cinema, yet they are less well known than those made in France, Britain or North and South America, despite the cult status of a few Italian documentarists, such as De Seta and Grifi, and the fact that many Italian directors of features, from Antonioni and Bertolucci to Pasolini and Visconti, also made non-fictions. The course has three main aims: (1) to familiarize students with a sample of Italian non-fiction films of different types: instructional, industrial, newsreel, propaganda, ethnographic, social, memoir, found footage; (2) to equip them to engage critically with these films through close analysis and reading of key texts on documentary; (3) to help them produce high-level critical writing about Italian documentary, paying particular attention to film style. The course consists of weekly readings, viewings and seminars and is graded on class participation, regular assignments and a final paper of 15-20 pages. A few non-Italian films will be viewed, either whole or in part, for comparison and context. Students will be invited to make by the end of the course a visual project, not formally graded, to complement their written paper. A knowledge of Italian will be an asset, but all prescribed films will either have English subtitles or an accompanying written translation or summary and all required readings will be in English.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1113  Sound/Image in The Avant Garde  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
This interdisciplinary course will investigate the relations between experimental film, radio, music, and sound art in modernism and postmodernism. The inventions of photography, cinema and sound recording radically altered the 19th century consciousness of perception, temporality, selfhood, and death. This course will study the aesthetic and ideological effects of this epochal shift, especially as it concerns the subsequent practice of avant-garde art and aesthetics. It will specifically focus on the recontextualization of the history of avant-garde film in the broader context of the sound arts and their discursive practices, from Dada and Surrealism through Lettrism, Situationism, Fluxus and the American Independent Cinema.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1114  Topics in French Cinema  (4 Credits)  
Topics vary per semester. Check departmental listings.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
CINE-GT 1122  Lecture in Irish Cinema:  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course surveys the cinema of Ireland from the silent period to the present day. In addition to looking at feature films, we will examine home movies, documentary, and television programming. Film and media intersect with this history of modern Ireland in complex ways, as the readings will detail. In the period spanning the beginning of the twentieth century (when film was introduced) to the present day, the Irish people lived through colonial domination, revolution, partition, civil war, mass emigration, theocracy, paramilitary sectarian violence, martial law (The Emergency Provisions Act), an unprecedented peace agreement and, finally, a contradictory sort of liberal secularism.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1127  Topics in TV  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Topics vary per semester. Check departmental listings.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1128  Television Sitcom  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course examines the history and politics of television’s most enduring genre, the situation comedy. The sitcom occupies a particularly important place in U.S. cultural hierarchies. Some see it as an innovative, quintessentially televisual form. For others it embodies mass culture's formulaic dross. But regardless of which side they may fall on, most scholars of TV history agree that the genre showcases U.S. preoccupations with class, race, gender, and other forms of difference, and that it simultaneously defines a particular kind of televisual aesthetic. How do we talk about this aesthetic—the distinctive typologies of character, plot, and mise-en-scene, and the unique institutional and narrative voices that find expression therein—in the context of debates over genre's political meanings? Such questions invite new ways of conceiving, and writing, genre criticism in TV, and that is the goal of this writing-intensive class.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1135  History of Chinese- Language Cinema I  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
This course traces the origins of Chinese cinema and its transformation and diversification into a multi-faceted, polycentric trans-regional phenomenon in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan up to the 1960s. We study a number of film cultures in Shanghai/China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, including the complex web of their historical kinship ties, and place them within the regional and global contexts of modernity, revolution, nation-building, and attendant socio-cultural transformations. To investigate these unique yet interrelated film cultures together raises the question of national cinema as a unitary object of study, while suggesting new avenues for analyzing the complex genealogy of a cluster of urban, regional, commercial or state-sponsored film industries within a larger comparative and transnational framework. Topics related to screenings and discussions include urban modernity, exhibition & spectatorship, transition to sound, stardom & propaganda, gender & ethnic identities, and genre formation and hybridization.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1136  History of Chinese-Language Cinema II  (4 Credits)  
The course offers a historical survey of Chinese-language cinema from the emergence of the new waves in Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Mainland China in the 1970s-1980s to the more recent formations around the turn of the new century. The distinctiveness of the three important Chinese cinemas and their increasing convergences after the Hong Kong handover in 1997, and under the impact of globalization, offer ideal laboratories for reconsidering the premises and usefulness of the concepts of national and transnational cinema. Along the same axis, we will also probe questions of cultural nationalism, neo-regionalism, a persistent cold war culture within the trans-Asian context, and the tension between the state's cultural policy and film industry, commercial cinema, and art or independent cinema. Given the massive transformations in media technology and industrial organization in the last two decades, we will also consider the ramifications of new media for film and screen culture, including new documentary movements, amateur and activist film/video practices, and queer and feminist cinema.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
CINE-GT 1141  Film Criticism  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
This course will examine the history and practice of film criticism as a means of helping students to sharpen their own critical thinking and writing. We'll focus on the finer points of film scholarship and film criticism, and discuss the benefits and drawbacks of theory as applied in criticism. We'll also examine the role of criticism in the age of the internet, and the specific demands of covering the festival circuit. Students will explore the practicalities and challenges of writing about film across all genres—including mainstream comedies and action films, art cinema and avant-garde film, political films and documentaries—and we’ll discuss modes of critical practice useful in addressing those films.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1148  British Cinema Now  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course explores trends in British cinema from the rise of the multiplex, through New Labor, to the postcolonial cinema of the present.   It examines key genres such as comedy, the gangster film, the Bond franchise, and the heritage film, as well as new examples of experimental and independent cinema.  It considers the centrality of the idea of a “national cinema” to British critics, the role of television in the financing of film, as well as the transnational character of this cinema. Directors whose work is discussed include Mike Leigh, Shane Meadows, Michael Winterbottom, Gary Oldman, Sally Potter, Ken Loach, Pawel Pawlikowski, Gurinder Chadha, Stephen Frears, and Terrence Davies.  The course introduces students to lesser known films as well as those that have successfully crossed the Atlantic--The Full Monty, Trainspotting, The Queen, Shakespeare in Love, Nil by Mouth, and Control. Course requirements include keeping a weekly viewing journal, writing a class paper, and giving an in-class presentation.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1151  Silent French Cinema  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
An evaluation of silent film production in France, including narrative and avant-garde films as well as non-fiction works, from the emergence of cinema to the transition to sound.  Among other topics, students will learn of France’s international dominance of cinema over the medium’s first ten years, of Max Linder’s importance to Charlie Chaplin, and of Alice Guy Blaché’s significance in the history of women’s filmmaking. Genres studied and screened include the modern studio spectacular, the serial film, science fiction, urban and maritime realism, the oriental fantasy, and the bourgeois melodrama
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1160  Contemporary African Cinema  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
The class explores major issues in African cinema from the politics of representation, decolonization, to authorship and aesthetics. A special focus will be on film language, apparatus ideology, politics, and reception. The main area of concentration will be the cinemas of sub-Saharan Africa. We will look at the aesthetic and political evolution of African film from the social, radical neo-realist cinema of Sembene Ousmane to the present. With the view of defining new aesthetics, since Sembene’s groundbreaking films, we will analyze films by such directors as Djibril Diop Mambety, Souleymane Cisse, Idrissa Ouedraogo, Abderrhamene Sissako, Safi Faye and Mati Diop, among others.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1163  The Chinese Martial Arts Film  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Where and when did the martial arts film emerge? What are the cultural resources this hybrid genre draws from? What kinds of spectatorship has it fostered over the course of nearly a century across national borders? This course addresses these and other related questions through a historical tracing of the genre’s origins and transformations in the broad landscape of transnational Chinese-language cinema (Hong Kong in particular) and its articulations in other cinemas (e.g.; US, Thailand, and Vietnam). Screenings include works by or featuring key figures such as King Hu, Chang Cheh, Bruce Lee, Tsui Hark, Chuck Norris, and Tony Jaa, as well as neglected experiments and films associated with their female stars including Angela Mao, Michelle Yeoh, and Cynthia Rothrock.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1177  Introduction to Latin American Cinema  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
For January 2022: Archives and Counter-Archives in Latin American Cinema A critical overview of Latin American diverse cinematic legacies that analyzes the history and access to archives and holdings of major national film archives, and minor archives (regional film archives, private film collections, community archives, border archives, and centros de la memoria).
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1202  Film Directors:  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Directors vary per semester. Check departmental listings.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
CINE-GT 1204  Comparative Directors:  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Topics vary per semester. Check departmental listings.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1205  Films of Alfred Hitchcock  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course will focus on representative films from all stages of Hitchcock’s career as a director, including his work in the silent era, his sextet of thrillers in the 1930s, his early films in Hollywood, and the films of his "major phase" in the 1950s and ‘60s, including his television work. Recurrent topics of discussion will include Hitchcock’s visual style; analysis and presentation of human weakness, wickedness, and sexuality as well as his critical examination of social institutions and political issues; representations of women; and reflections on the act of watching and the art of cinema.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1212  Neo Noir  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
“Neo Noir” explores the multiple ways that films made beyond the classic period reference, appropriate, extend, pay homage to, and even define that amorphous category called “film noir”: from nostalgia to escalation, from remakes to meta discourse retroactively constructing a “genre,” from (further) genre hybridization to the dispersion of disconnected noir elements (crime, paranoia, the femme fatale, subjective flashback, existentialism), from realist-expressionist black and white to blatant and stylized color, from censorship’s dark sexuality to hyperreal violence, from national to international. A tentative list of films includes Body Heat, Taxi Driver, Blood Simple, Exotica, Coup de Torchon, High and Low, One False Move, The Grifters, Memento, Usual Suspects, The Last Seduction, Kill Bill, Chungking Express, Mulholland Drive, The Thin Blue Line, and Funny Games. Rather than attempting to rein in film noir, the course celebrates Neo Noir’s exponential extrapolations. Students are encouraged to pursue their cinephilic aptitude in outside screenings. Key literary texts will also be examined. Hence, although critical readings are crucial, a large component of the course assignments will include creative works.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1225  Hitchcock and His Influence  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Hitchcock is the most recognized and imitated film director in the history of movies. The course will seek to examine and explain Hitchcock's influence and seek to understand, through the case of Hitchcock, the very idea of cinematic influence. The class will begin by closely examining key works of Hitchcock (Rear Window, Vertigo, Psycho, and The Birds) in order to understand the elements that make up Hitchcock's universe, in particular, the complex role and function of suspense. We shall then examine the nature and scope of Hitchcock's influence upon American and European Cinema in the work of directors such as Chabrol, Truffaut, Almodóvar, Argento, Verhoeven, Spielberg, Scorcese, Lynch, Antonioni, Fincher, and de Palma.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1230  Scorsese's New York  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Summer term of even numbered years  
This course will focus on the New York City films of Martin Scorsese. We shall approach several of the films (e.g. Gangs of New York, The Age of Innocence) as filmic examples of historical fiction and most of the other films in terms of their socio-cultural representation of New York City phenomena (e.g. immigration, crime, the art and entertainment industries). As well, we will be concerned with exploring Scorsese’s “narrative method” – his usages of film form and style – in relation to the above issues.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1304  Film Noir  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Whether one understands film noir as a genre, cycle, or style, one cannot deny that it has become an important cultural mythology. Using a broad array of historical and critical frameworks, this course explores why film noir has been so significant, beginning with its roots in 1930s European cinema, moving through its "classic" period in 1940s and 50s Hollywood films, and concluding with the current success of neo-noir.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1312  Noir/Neo-Noir  (4 Credits)  
“Neo Noir” explores the multiple ways that films made beyond the classic period reference, appropriate, extend, pay homage to, and even define that amorphous category called “film noir”: from nostalgia to escalation; from remakes to meta discourse retroactively constructing a “genre;” from genre hybridization to the dispersion of disconnected noir elements (crime, paranoia, the femme fatale, subjective flashback, existentialism); from realist-expressionist black and white to blatantly stylized color; from censorship’s dark sexuality to hyperreal violence; from national to international. To support our study of neo noir, we will simultaneously reference classic film noir from the 1940-50s and its scholarship, considering visual aesthetics, historical/cultural resonances, international/interdisciplinary influences, philosophical/psychological references, and gender relations. However, rather than attempting to rein in Neo Noir insisting on fidelity to film noir, the course celebrates Neo Noir’s exponential extrapolations.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1315  Asian American Cinema  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered all terms  
Asian American Media: As anger coalesced around the injustice of law enforcement and judicial systems sanctioning the murder of black and brown people, network television took up the case of “diversity.” ABC featured a slate of "diverse" primetime programming through Black-ish and Cristela in Fall 2014; in February 2015, Fresh Off the Boat, featuring an Asian American family, premiered. This course uses Asian American media to help us think through the interrelation of these events. While necessarily familiarizing students with the historical and historiographic contexts of the field, we will foreground the rubric “Asian American Media” as an analytic rather than as an object of knowledge. In other words, we’ll approach Asian American media not as a set of texts produced by “Asian American” bodies, but instead as a continuous inquiry into the challenges of and to embodied representation. Our aims are: 1) to apprehend the mechanisms of racial formation in a U.S.-based context, especially as they are negotiated by various media; 2) to develop an understanding of the ways in which Asian-raced bodies have interacted with mainstream and independent American media industries; and 3) to interrogate the intellectual and material conditions that produce the disciplinary boundaries of media studies. Screenings will range from pre-code Hollywood to studio musicals, community video, independent cinema, television, and the Internet.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1317  Blaxploitation  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course explores the rise and fall of Hollywood's "Blaxploitation" period and genre. We will look at the genre's continuing influence on American commercial cinema and popular culture. We will locate the fifty-odd films of the period in the cultural, political, ‘black identity and liberation' contexts at the end of the Civil Rights Movement, and at the rise of the Black Power and Black Aesthetics movements of the mid-‘70s. Also, we will explore what Blaxploitation was ‘saying' to (and about) its audience; how Blaxploitation draws upon black literary convention; the black crime novel; and black music and film noir. We will also examine Blaxploitation's niche in, and contribution to, Hollywood's political economy, and how Blaxploitation's aesthetic and cultural conventions and formula have crossed over to address a broad popular audience in a number of popular contemporary films and popular cultural expressions.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1325  The Musical  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course surveys the film musical genre from the coming of sound to the present, engaging the rich critical literature about it. We examine the musical’s relation to technological changes (the use of optical sound, dubbing, widescreen, motion capture) and also to social, cultural, and economic transformations (the Depression, rise of teen audiences, changing priorities in casting, innovations in music). By paying close attention to editing, cinematography, lighting and other aesthetic elements as well as to the multiple aspects of performance that contribute to the musical’s milieu, we uncover both its utopian and its grittier sides. The course pays attention to: early all-Black cast musicals; history of classical Hollywood titles of the 1930s-1950s (Maurice Chevalier, Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, Gene Kelly and Cyd Charisse, etc); a range of genre appropriations and deconstructions by non-Hollywood and often non-American filmmakers (Julie Dash, Chantal Akerman, Jacques Demy, Lars von Trier); and weighs more recent musical titles within this history (eg. La La Land). Coursework: short written responses; a presentation; a short final paper.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1332  Black Experimental Cinemas  (4 Credits)  
What might it mean to consider avant-garde and experimental film and video with attention to the art of blackness? With a focus on Black artists from around the world, the course examines the history, politics, culture, and aesthetics of avant-garde and experimental film and video. With a concentration on new methodologies of black study and interdisciplinary scholarship devoted to black visual and expressive culture, the course will challenge and expand canonical conceptions of avant-garde and experimental cinemas.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
CINE-GT 1402  Culture and Media  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
This course offers a critical revision of the history of the genre of ethnographic film, the central debates it has engaged around cross-cultural representation, and the theoretical and cinematic responses to questions of the screen representation of culture, from the early romantic constructions of Robert Flaherty to current work in film, television, and video on the part of indigenous people throughout the world. Ethnographic film has a peculiar and highly contested status within anthropology, cinema studies, and documentary practice. This seminar situates ethnographic film within the wider project of the representation of cultural lives, and especially of natives. Starting with what are regarded as the first examples of the genre, the course examines how these emerged in a particular intellectual context and political economy. It then considers the key works that have defined the genre, and the epistemological and formal innovations associated with them, addressing questions concerning social theory, documentary, as well as the institutional structures through which they are funded, distributed, and seen by various audiences. Throughout, the course keeps in mind the properties of film as a signifying practice, its status as a form of anthropological knowledge, and the ethical and political concerns raised by cross-cultural representation.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1403  Culture & Media II  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
In the last decade, a new field–the ethnography of media–has emerged as an exciting new arena of research. While claims about media in peoples’ lives are made on a daily basis, surprisingly little research has actually attempted to look at how media is part of the naturally occurring lived realities of people?s lives. In the last decade, anthropologists and media scholars interested in film, television, and video have been turning their attention increasingly beyond the text and the empiricist notions of audiences (stereotypically associated with the ethnography of media), to consider, ethnographically, the complex social worlds in which media is produced, circulated, and consumed, at home and elsewhere. This work theorizes media studies from the point of view of cross-cultural ethnographic realities and anthropology from the perspective of new spaces of communication focusing on the social, economic, and political life of media and how it makes a difference in the daily lives of people as a practice, whether in production, reception, or circulation.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1500  The Scriptwriter's Craft  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course is designed to center the work of the writer by analyzing the storytelling techniques employed by a mix of Hollywood, independent, and international screenwriters from Waldo Salt to Dee Rees, Bill Gunn to Guillermo Arriaga, Julie Dash to Sooni Taraporevala and more (this list of writers is subject to change and in several cases we will screen at least two different films by the same screenwriter).
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1513  French New Wave I  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course offers an historical and critical overview of the French New Wave. Along with examining the philosophical underpinnings of the movement in philosophical existentialism (Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir), the artistic underpinnings in modernism, and the theoretical underpinnings in the film theory/criticism of Cahiers du Cinema, we will examine key films and directors. We will explore the work of the three core groups that together formed the New Wave, notably 1) the Cahiers critic-directors (Truffaut, Godard, Chabrol, Rivette, Rohmer); 2) the Left Bank directors (Resnais, Duras, Varda, Marker); and 3) Cinema Verite (Jean Rouch, Edgar Morin), along with 4) precursors like Jean-Pierre Melville and Roger Vadim, and 5) mavericks like Jacques Demy and Louis Malle. While we will focus largely on the films themselves, we will also situate New Wave films within a broader artistic, historical, and social context. Some key themes in the course will be: first-person auteur cinema; artistic modernism and the New Wave; the relation between film and the other arts; the revolution in film language; the question of adaptation; treatment of love, romance, and adultery; representations of race, gender and sexuality; the theory of style and aesthetics; the impact of Brecht; the hauntologies of war, collaboration, and colonialism; and the political changes, reflected in film, that led to the near-revolution of May 1968 and to dramatic changes in the film world.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1703  Stars  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Topics vary per semester. Check departmental listings for current description when offered: https://tisch.nyu.edu/cinema-studies/courses/ma-in-cinema-studies
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1780  Queer Studies:  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Topics vary per semester. Check departmental listings for current description when offered: https://tisch.nyu.edu/cinema-studies/courses/ma-in-cinema-studies
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1809  Save Your Stuff: DIY Media Archiving  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
In a world where individuals are constantly generating digital content for personal and professional use, learning how to organize and save this material is essential for ensuring its long-term accessibility. This introductory course will impart practical skills from the world of archiving to help students take control of the media they store at home, in the studio, or online. Students will learn to identify legacy analog and digital formats, assess a filmmaker's collection for a digitization project, and plan for the ongoing care of their media. Designed for anyone who wants to save their digital content, this course is especially well-suited for students, scholars, artists, filmmakers, musicians, activists, bloggers, and journalists. Emphasis will be placed on preserving audiovisual and photographic materials, with additional consideration of documents and social media.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1904  Copyright Law for Cultural Institutions  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Includes in-person and online sessions. Please contact tisch.preservation@nyu.edu for questions about this course or enrollment. This course addresses the intellectual property issues and related ethical ones that surround the management, preservation, and dissemination of cultural material (such as paper records and their digital surrogates, museum objects, film, video, and other ephemera) in collecting institutions. The course is designed primarily as a professional development opportunity for those who already work with cultural objects, providing either a refresher or an upgrade to existing knowledge and practice. Some of the questions to be addressed are: What are the various legal and ethical rights that may encumber cultural material? How do these rights affect the subsequent long-term exhibition of the works once they enter into the collection of a museum or archive? How do we go about clearing these rights, and can these issues be managed effectively over time? What are the international considerations in dealing with content created in one jurisdiction, but exhibited or distributed in another? This course also has an online component. Students will be required to analyze existing film, video, paper or other cultural material, examine the intellectual property issues, present findings within existing standards of practice in the field, and use electronic means of communication (NYU Wikis, blog) to compare and contrast findings.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 1981  Topics:  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Topics vary per semester. Check departmental listings for current description when offered: https://tisch.nyu.edu/cinema-studies/courses/ma-in-cinema-studies
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 2001  Cultural Theory and The Documentary  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
This class applies forms of anthropological, historical, gender, and cultural studies theory to a range of genres: countercolonial, cinema verité, direct cinema, ethnographic, instructional, historical, and auteurist documentaries. It is designed for cinema studies graduate students interested in documentary film or working toward the Ph.D. exam in cultural theory and/or history of the documentary and for students in the M.A. Certificate Program in Culture and Media.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 2004  Topics & Problems Film Narrative: Voice-Over  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Topics vary per semester. Check departmental listings.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
CINE-GT 2005  Close Analysis of Film  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Summer 2022: This class examines a small number of films in great detail with the intention of enhancing student comprehension of the multiple levels at which films are made and engage us. Among the film scenes that we may analyze are examples taken from: Touch of Evil (1958), Do the Right Thing (1989), In the Mood for Love (2000), Pan’s Labyrinth (2006), Run, Lola, Run (1998), Fish Tank (2009), Whisky (2004), Power of the Dog (2021), and Gilda (1946). The course encourages the intensive, and comparative study of film, and concentrates on a discrete number of tasks: the formal analysis of the sound and image tracks; examination of the shape of the scenario and the segmentation of the narrative; consideration of techniques of stylistic analysis; and a consideration of a film’s surrounding documents, such as studio papers, posters, blogs, trailers, and critical reviews. Students will acquire vocabulary and tools through which to describe the textual patterns and forces by which a film produces its meanings and effects. Students complete a central project for the class: the close analysis of an individual film that they have chosen, including a final presentation on their findings.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 2006  Psychopaths  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course will consider popular film and literary representations of psychopaths and sociopaths. We will be interested not only in what horrifies audiences but what attracts them to these figures. When, how, and why are we asked/required to identify/empathize with psychopaths? How do such characters negotiate attractions to and fears of hyper/hypo masculinity? What type of female falls for psychopaths (i.e., into love and/or into death)? How do popular renditions of psychopathy compare and contrast with journalistic and medical discourses on the subject? Several key films/novels from mid 20th century provide a core for our investigation of a classic contradiction in this characterization: Night of the Hunter (dir. Charles Laughton, based on novel by Davis Grubb); In a Lonely Place (dir. Nicholas Ray, based on novel by Dorothy Hughes); Brighton Rock (dir. Rowan Joffee, based on novel by Graham Greene); The Talented Mr. Ripley (dir. Anthony Minghella, based on novel by Patricia Highsmith); In Cold Blood (Richard Brookes, based on the novel by Truman Capote). More recent films that extend narrative conventions and aesthetic strategies and/or raise new issues include: Silence of the Lambs (Jonathan Demme); The Act of Killing (Joshua Oppenheimer); Funny Games (Michael Haneke); I Stand Alone (Gaspar Noé). Students will be assigned to read one novel, participate in discussion of several critical texts, and present/write on their own favorite psychopaths.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 2008  Community Archiving: Media Collections  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This graduate seminar combines research into moving image collections, both institutionally and individually held, with hands-on archival tasks that will provide insight into the way that media is collected, cared for, and accessed. Through direct engagement with endangered independent media collections from the 1960s-1980s, students will gain an understanding of key philosophies and practices of video production in the US during this period, as well as of the practical labor and the decision-making involved in access for their scholarship and creative re-use. Students will plan and carry out community archiving events where they will work side by side with caretakers and other stakeholders, taking preparatory steps necessary to understanding the content, relative value, and physical condition of the tapes – tasks designed to aid in selection, preservation planning and access. The primary partner will be the National Black Programming Consortium (blackpublicmedia.org/). Students will use primary and secondary materials and discussions with creators and caretakers to gain an understanding of the context within which early video collections were made, distributed and collected. Students will also be assigned key texts on archival theory and methodologies, particularly those addressing theories and practices of community-based documentation, ethical practices, and the roles of specialists and non-specialists in archiving and maintaining media materials. Students need not have experience with moving image archiving and preservation. Advanced undergraduates may enroll with the permission of the instructor.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
CINE-GT 2057  Film Adaptations  (4 Credits)  
This class focuses on the theories, strategies, and consequence of adapting novels, comics, histories, and memoirs to film and television. Rather than measuring adaptations in terms of successful fidelity to their source work, the course will emphasize adaptation with attention to narrative, genre, historiography, and affect. Pairing an interdisciplinary framing of film theory with historical and cultural contexts, the course centers the formal and textual properties that shape the art of film adaptation.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
CINE-GT 2107  Topics in Hollywood Cinema:  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Topics vary per semester. Check departmental listings.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
CINE-GT 2116  Hollywood 1939  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
For critics and fans, 1939 is a year that crystallized the cultural and even artistic potential of the Hollywood studio system: this, after all, was the year of such revered works as Gone with the Wind, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Wuthering Heights, Stagecoach, The Wizard of Oz, among others. Intending to avoid any notion of special genius or historical accident or such-like, this course sets out to account for Hollywood achievement in concrete material, industrial, and social terms: what was the Hollywood system and what sorts of films did it produce and how and to what effect? We will look at studio structure and its operations, institutional support and pressure (for example, the role of censorship and regulation), the role of critics, audience taste, and so on. While we will draw on important secondary studies, much of the reading will be drawn from texts of the time in order to garner as immediate and vivid a picture of the functioning of the Hollywood system at a moment often assumed to represent its pinnacles of achievement.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 2121  Topics in Film Genre:  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Topics vary per semester. Check departmental listings.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
CINE-GT 2125  Hollywood Cinema: 1960 to present  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
This course offers a broad survey of American cinema from 1960 up to the present. While the emphasis will be on the dominant, narrative fiction film, there will be attention to other modes of American cinema such as experimental film, animation, shorts, and non-fiction film. The course will look closely at films themselves -- how do their styles and narrative structures change over time? -- but also at contexts: how do films reflect their times? how does the film industry develop? what are the key institutions that had impact on American film over its history? We will also attend to the role of key figures in film's history: from creative personnel (for example, the director or the screenwriter) to industrialists and administrators, to censors to critics and to audiences themselves. The goal will be to provide an overall understanding of one of the most consequential of modern popular art forms and of its particular contributions to the art and culture of our modernity.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 2202  Kubrick  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Summer term of odd numbered years  
The films of Stanley Kubrick constitute one of the most innovative bodies of work in the cinema. This course investigates Kubrick’s films in detail with emphasis on their narrative conceptions and structures. The course will explore the uses of irony and voiceover, the relationship between humans and technology, the centrality of the topic of war, and questions of genre in his films.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 2220  Pedro Almodovar  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Summer term of even numbered years  
Pedro Almodóvar is the most notorious Spanish filmmaker since Luis Buñuel, and, like Buñuel, he rapidly gained international acclaim. This course will attend to Almodóvar’s appealing body of work (What Have I Done to Deserve This, Matador, Law of Desire, Tie Me Up Tie Me Down, All About My Mother, Talk to Her, Bad Education, Volver, Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown, The Skin I Live In, among others) in relation to: national political history; international film exhibition; intertextual popular culture; comedy-thriller-melodrama genre mixing; convoluted narrative structures; theatrical uses of color, music, acting, and scale; interrelated themes of family, desire, and identity; and an aesthetics of excess. Finally we will consider the “outstanding” Almodóvar within a context of “influence.”
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 2222  Topics in German Studies  (2 Credits)  
Topics vary per semester. Check departmental listings for current description when offered: https://tisch.nyu.edu/cinema-studies/courses/ma-in-cinema-studies
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
CINE-GT 2228  Robert Altman:Renegade  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course will provide an in-depth study of the films of Robert Altman. Primary emphasis will be placed on his development of a narrative mode which in its emphasis on a multi-character structure constitutes an alternative to classical Hollywood filmmaking. As well, his innovations in the uses of sound, editing, camera movement and performance will be considered. The topic of genre transformation defined in relation to historical, political and cultural characteristics of especially 1970’s America will provide another topic of interest. The course will concentrate on Altman's status as a renegade filmmaker during the 1970’s, but also provide a sense of the overall contours of his career. Screenings, readings and papers will be required.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 2307  Non-Fiction Film History  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Summer 2022: New York City, long mythologized in fiction film and television, has an equally rich and long-lived relationship to documentary media. From Paul Strand and Charles Sheeler’s celebrated 1921 city symphony film Manhatta, to Beatrice Glow’s ongoing Mannahatta VR (2016-present) exploring the city’s Indigenous past and present, NYC has served as site and subject for multiple generations of documentary filmmakers, artists, and activists. In this course, we explore an eclectic range of non-fiction media produced in and about the city, to consider the ways that documentary — with its own particular histories, conventions, affordances, and limitations — may enrich and complicate our understanding and experience of NYC. At the same time, this course serves as an introduction to the dynamic world of documentary production, distribution, and exhibition in New York today, through weekly visits to some of the city’s most vital documentary organizations and venues.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 2500  Mass Effect: Art & The Internet  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Since the mid 1990s the Internet has evolved from a space viewed as ripe with potential but fraught with unknown dangers to a true mass medium full of new opportunities and risks we must now negotiate. Throughout, artists have used this medium to make art that employs, documents, and examines emerging online platforms and social media. Charting a loose timeline of art works, formative debates, and happenings, this course will look at the ongoing relationship of art and technology. From the early online copy wars and the url gold rush, to surf clubs, image chat, and now emoji domains, we’ll look at how online art has evolved and the key players involved in making it all happen. We’ll also examine commercial platforms for art practice, art in the age of surveillance, and the scholarship that has emerged simultaneously, including concepts such as Net Aesthetics 2.0, The New Aesthetic, and Post-Internet art.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
CINE-GT 2512  Ways of Seeing  (4 Credits)  
This course concerns the racial and cultural debates that have come in the wake of centuries of conquest, colonialism, postcoloniality, and cultural mixing of all kinds, as reflected in the cinema, the media, and popular culture generally. The course transnationalizes issues that are too often seen only in a narrow national frame of the U.S. All the debates about (the much censured) Critical Race Theory, anti-Semitism, Islamophobia, White Supremacy, indigenous genocide and discrimination are transnational debates which go at least as far back as Columbus and the Conquest of the Americas. The course examines how these issues have been apprehended through a number of national histories and traditions, and how all those debates are refracted in film, media and popular culture.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 3031  Adv. Seminar Theories of History  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
Scholars of the moving image write history, but not under circumstances of their own making. This reading intensive graduate seminar is for students interested in considering these circumstances as they pursue advanced research in the history of moving image texts, cultures, and institutions.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 3104  Landscape and Cinema  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
Paying special attention to the contemporary hybridization of the arts, this seminar will investigate the following topics in relation to both avant-garde and popular cinema: anguish, eros and the landscape as symbolic form; landscape, film and the Gesamtkunstwerk; imaginary landscapes and alternate worlds; ecological and technological soundscapes; the aesthetics of dilapidation.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 3244  Adv. Sem: Asian Film History  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
Critically evaluating select influential scholarship in Asian film studies from the last two decades, this seminar aims to reconsider and move beyond existing paradigms such as national cinema, world cinema, and transnational cinema, in addition to categories or assumptions derived from traditional area studies with origins in the cold war cultural politics. While critically reviewing literature on specific cases of national and regional cinemas (e.g.; China, Japan, India), we will explore alternative perspectives on trans- Asian and trans-hemispheric film culture histories (for example, film policy, censorship, co-production, traveling genres, festivals), as well as contemporary formations.
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
CINE-GT 3800  MA Writing Workshop  (4 Credits)  
MA Writing Workshop description may vary. View departmental website for up to date information: https://tisch.nyu.edu/cinema-studies/courses/ma-in-cinema-studies/
Grading: Grad Tisch Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No