Sports Management (TCSM1-UC)

TCSM1-UC 1000  Introduction to Sports Management  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
An overview of the history of leisure and sports as a cultural phenomenon. Topics include: the nature of leisure behavior; historical, ethical, social, and economic aspects of the sports industry; the terminology of sports; and the forces that have effected the growth of sports as a business.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 1010  Organizations in Sports  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
A survey of businesses, organizations, and political entities that work within and affect the sports industry. Students will explore basic management principles and organizational structures such as business life cycles, industry practices, and the influence of governmental regulations. The course introduces the student to Olympic sport governing bodies, professional leagues, collegiate sport, sporting goods manufacturers, and sports agencies, and marketing firms. Students will analyze the collegiate and American professional sport landscape and how each function within the larger scope of the industry.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 1015  Sport Business Practicum  (1 Credit)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
This course provides students with introductory industry experience through an opportunity to work in a sport business or organization. Building a career requires appropriate industry work experience to strengthen the student’s knowledge and skill formed in the classroom. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the field, professional development, and communication. Students are expected to complete a 50-hour work experience approved by the Tisch Institute within a period of 5-8 weeks. As part of the course, students will create a professional website, set written goals and objectives related to the worksite, complete readings, and written reflections of their industry experience.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 1020  Consumer Behavior  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
A survey of consumer behavior in sports. Topics covered include: social factors shaping how individuals perceive and use leisure time and discretionary income, ways consumers manifest interest in sports, impact of group dynamics and decision making, the role of media in shaping consumer choices and opinions, fan affinity and avidity.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 1050  Foundations in Sport Entrepreneurship  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Entrepreneurialism is a major growth area in the field of sport business as many sport management professionals have decided to start their own businesses. This course is designed to give the undergraduate student both a theoretical and practical exposure to issues related to this endeavor and awareness and understanding of basic business responsibilities of sport business entrepreneurs, which influence the management of sport programs. Special emphasis is placed on discovering and evaluating opportunities, developing appropriate business concepts; determining and acquiring needed resources, and managing the start-up and growth phases of new business creation. The operational requirements of a wide range of sport businesses are considered. Learning will occur through student research, participative learning, and oral presentation of the many components of the course's content.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 1055  Research Methods  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
This course prepares the student to do and to evaluate social science research using a variety of research methods. Basic issues regarding the formulation of research questions, research design, and data collection and analysis are addressed. The course material encompasses both quantitative and qualitative methods in the discussion of the basic components of the research process: conceptualization and measurement, sample selection, and causal modeling. In addition to teaching techniques and conventions of doing research, the course also acquaints the student with critical issues in the philosophy of science, ethical questions, and how to write a research proposal.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 1060  Applied Research  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
A review of the processes of obtaining and analyzing relevant, reliable, valid, and current information necessary for the examination of the sports industry practices and trends. Topics to be covered include: assessing scholarly research, analyzing industry reports, staying current with industry trends, designing a coherent research project, analyzing data, and applying research findings to specific managerial problems.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 1071  Strategies for Academic Succes  (0 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
An introduction to college and to the educational culture, policies, procedures, resources, and programs of the Tisch Center and New York University. Topics to be covered include: self assessment, educational goals, study skills, an introduction to library resources, the process of finding materials, and a tour of University resources, including the Bobst Library.
Grading: UC SPS Pass/Fail  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 1080  Advanced Seminar in Sports Management  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
A review and analysis of an important current issue through the perspectives of operations, marketing, finance, human resources, law, and strategic management. Topics covered include: strategic thinking, global perspectives, and practical business research. Students will work in teams on analyzing the topic and develop a range of management strategies for a specific problem.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
TCSM1-UC 1100  Financial Management for Sports Organizations  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
A survey of financial instruments utilized when analyzing the fiscal stability of various sports entities, organizations and governing bodies.Topics covered include: basic financial concepts and reporting requirements that apply to the sports industry,financial markets and institutions, ratio analysis, the time value of money, raising and investing capital, budgeting, forecasting, planning and managing long term investments, debt and equity management, and risk assessment.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 1120  Sports Management Accounting  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
A survey of accounting instruments and statements utilized within the sports industry. Topics covered include: accounting principles that govern a business life cycle; cash basis versus accrual basis accounting; original, adjusting, and closing journal entries; the creation of balance sheets, income statements, owner?s equity statements, and statement of cash flows; contra asset accounts; and depreciation calculations.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 1130  Financial Management & Accounting in Sport  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
A survey of financial and accounting instruments utilized when analyzing the fiscal stability of various sports entities, organizations, and governing bodies. Topics covered include accounting principles, the creation of balance sheets, income statements, owner’s equity statements, and statement of cash flows, basic financial concepts and reporting requirements that apply to the sports industry, financial markets, and institutions, ratio analysis, the time value of money, raising and investing capital, budgeting, forecasting, planning and managing long term investments, debt and equity management, and risk assessment.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 1350  Senior Seminar in Leadership  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
This course is designed specifically for graduating seniors and is intended to generate critical thought, reflection, and application of leadership development and civic engagement. It will require students to develop the practice of personal reflection, especially with regard to beliefs about leadership and the integration of leadership in communities and the broader sport industry. Through the integration of multi-disciplinary approaches to civic engagement and leadership development, students will balance theoretical and practical awareness of civic skill-building. Throughout the semester, students will draw upon their collegiate experience for ways to make meaning of how leadership is defined and how it changes over the course of time.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 1360  Customer Relationship Management  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
An analysis of expectations and strategies to assess and satisfy customer demands. Topics to be covered include: customer behaviors and expectations, service delivery strategies, customer value, guest satisfaction, service quality, continuous improvement processes, customer communication skills, technological applications, and reward and loyalty programs.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 1600  Business Development I  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
An examination of business management principles (planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling) and organizational structures (single proprietorship, partnership, limited liability corporation, C corporation, and S corporation) from human, legal and financial perspectives. Topics covered include: life cycles of businesses, financial and risk analysis for businesses, legal issues in business operations, premises liability, franchising arrangements, analysis of physical assets, industry practices, managerial strategies, and current governmental regulations.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 1601  Business Development II  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
An examination of the principles of organizing, operating, financing and operating single and mixed use projects from the perspectives of business operators, investors, and owners. Topics covered include: project finance, market analysis, facility contracts, leaseholder agreements, models of mortgages and public financing, sources of capital and their impact on projects, and public and private partnerships. A case study analyzing a particular project will be integrated into the course.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 1602  Business Development III  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
An analysis of the challenges faced and skills necessary in running a small organization or making changes within a large one from the perspectives of marketing, finance, law, and human resources. Topics covered included: the principles and procedures for starting a business, changing corporate structures, franchising, media strategies, making businesses successful over the long term, making effective changes in organizations, leading an organization, the dimensions of entrepreneurial behavior.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2000  Internship I  (1 Credit)  
Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer terms  
Basic concepts of group processes, leadership and supervision in recreation. Analysis of leadership techniques, methods and styles. Study of fundamental supervisory functions. Topics include: trends and issues in leadership, comprehension of individual leadership abilities, understanding of planning, implementation and evaluation of programs and activities.
Grading: UC SPS Pass/Fail  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2010  Internship II  (1-3 Credits)  
Examination of leisure interests, needs and patterns of participation in urban centers in relation to facilities, programs, and personnel required for delivery of leisure services. Emphasis is given to study of different cultural groups and the development of skills and techniques for leading recreation activities.
Grading: SPS Diploma Credit Pass/Fail  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
TCSM1-UC 2020  Global Studies  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course concentrates on international and global issues in the sport industry, specifically in a global location. By the end of the course, you will develop a comprehensive understanding of the forces influencing international sport. You will also improve your knowledge of world geography and international sport through the exploration of developed and potential tourist areas in the chosen global location of study. Contemporary issues, as they relate to social and economic trends in the global location are explored. In a diverse, global industry, the student must recognize and understand diversity. Students will explore how the host destination’ culture influences sport business. Students will also explore the destination’s rich history, lived experience, culture, identity to understand how a worldview can enhance and/or hinder sport. Students will also examine how the location relies on or uses sport. Sport can often be a powerful teaching tool to explore how inequalities can be perpetuated in different countries, as well as our own. Students will explore this through both business and culture in the location.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
TCSM1-UC 2100  Public Relations in Sport  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
This course is an analysis of the information management processes in the sport industry. The relationships between sport organizations, the public, and the media are explored. This course focuses on the benefit of regular traditional and non-traditional communication between a sport organization and its key stakeholders. The development of effective communication skills will be emphasized through class projects, presentations, and written assignments.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2120  Sport Media Storytelling  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Sport Multimedia Storytelling is an introduction to the elements of news gathering and writing. Topics include effective leads, deadline coverage, feature and news story writing, interviewing sources, diversity and inclusion, ethical reporting, and effective research. Students will learn how to develop story ideas, organize materials, plan, outline, and write the story. Additionally, students will learn how to write and create for audio mediums, like podcasting.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2320  Sports Law  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
A survey of the legal system and the ways it intersects with organized sports. Topics covered include: legislative processes; common and civil law systems; contractual analysis and interpretation; constitutional rights; remedies; the powers of Commissioners; player contractual issues; regulation of agents; fiduciary relations; collective bargaining agreement, arbitration and negotiation; tort liability, defamation, gender equity and discrimination.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2330  Sports Facility Management  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
An examination of the issues related to public assembly sports facilities (stadiums, aquatic centers, and arenas). Topics to be covered include planning, managing, operating, maintaining and pricing events at a variety of different facilities. Also considered are issues related to the maximizing of revenue from new and existing facilities; event security and patron flow.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2350  Strategic Pricing and Revenue Management  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered not typically offered  
Maximizing revenue with a sports facility and maintaining control of internal and external costs is essential to earning a profit. Whether managing an inventory, determining cost of items, or developing a staffing plan, students will learn to measure tangible and intangible areas that affect the bottom line. Topics include pricing theory, cost-value-profit analysis, yield management, review of business agreements, competitive analysis, evaluating a merchandising plan, and managing inventory.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2355  Revenue Generation in Sport  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
This course examines the ways in which global sport franchises, corporate entities, non-profit entities, and individuals utilize sports and entertainment to drive revenue. The course focuses on sources of revenue for a wide variety of sport businesses, such as tickets, licensing and merchandise, sponsorships, and fundraising. Pricing strategies for various sectors of the sport industry will be covered in-depth, along with contemporary issues regarding revenue generation such as dynamic ticket pricing, the secondary ticket market, and league or governing body regulations.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2360  Marketing of Sales of Sports Facilities  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered not typically offered  
One of the challenges facing sports managers today is how to create innovative products and marketing strategies so the sports facility gains a market presence. This course applies marketing concepts to the sports complexes with emphasis on the role of sales, public relations, promotion, media planning, and marketing management. Topics include distribution channels/ product identification; differentiation programming and packaging, marketing trends, and application of sales techniques to sports operations.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2380  Collegiate Athletic Departments  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
An analysis of individual collegiate athletic departments and their impact on the sports industry. Topics to be covered include: the departmental structures of NCAA Division I, II and Division III member institutions; the role of the athletic director; departmental staffing; trends in coaching; coaching contracts; financial trends in collegiate athletics; scholarship and facility funding; NCAA and conference compliance; conference realignment; Title IX and Gender Equity.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2400  Sports Business Development: Understanding Sports as a Business in New York and Beyond  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered not typically offered  
Sports are an expanding global business. This expansion includes opportunities beyond the playing field or arena, in media, broadcasting, sponsorship, marketing, leadership, law and governance. Perhaps no other city in the world is home to or the focal point of such a range of sports business entities as is New York. The city is the home to five major professional sports leagues, nine major sports franchises, numerous iconic facilities and venues, the best attended annual sporting event in the world- tennis’ U.S. Open, major networks, marketing and advertising agencies and law firms all working in the sports sector. This course through a range of guest lectures with sports sector leaders, site visits to key firms and facilities and classroom experiences designed to make use of New York as a laboratory will explore the breadth and depth of this exciting and growing field. Learning Objectives 1. Indentify the various types of sports business entities in the New York marketplace 2. Describe the major revenue generation capability of sports business entities in the New York marketplace 3. Analyze the interrelationship between different sports business entities 4. Describe why New York has developed as a hub for sports business 5. Analyze whether the sports businesses practices seen in New York are adaptable around the world Students completing this course would receive credit in the Tisch Center.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2420  Planning, Design, and Construction of Facilities  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered not typically offered  
This course provides an overview of sports facility planning, design, development and construction process form its inception to the grand opening. Topics will focus on the identification of property location, identification of capital, zoning laws, local building policies and the design and planning of a facility. The importance of interior and exterior design and the use of existing resources will be discussed. Students will learn how to plan and design a sports facility using graphics and computer-aided design programs.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2425  Financial Modeling in Sport  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
Analyzing the financial background of the sport enterprise provides insights about operating and strategic decisions. In this course, the subjects to be examined include financial modeling related to decision making associated with time value of money, budget analysis, capital budgeting, pro forma team and facility forecasting, debt and equity management, debt structuring, media and sponsorship evaluation, and the valuation of the sport enterprise. The course will be devoted to using Excel spreadsheets modeling under a variety of scenarios to enable the student to gain fundamental skills in spreadsheet analysis as well as making financial decisions that are specific to the sport organization.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2430  Capital Markets & Investments in Sport  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
An examination of the principles of organizing, operating, and financing teams as well as single and mixed-use projects from the perspectives of business operators, investors, and owners. A review of the valuation of the sports enterprise, including team holdings, facilities, and ancillary real estate. Topics covered include: analyzing risk-adjusted returns, structuring letters of intent, team and facility leases and project documents, market analysis, identification of key enterprise revenues and expenses, event mix utilization, facility contracts, lender agreements, league leverage rules, credit stratification, sourcing capital and enterprise valuation methodology, sources of capital and their impact on projects, and public and private partnerships. Several case studies analyzing a variety of projects will be integrated into the course.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2440  Olympic Sport Governance  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
An examination of the international and national sport organizations that govern Olympic sport. Topics to be covered include: the history, structure and governance of the International Olympic Committee (IOC); the roles and responsibilities of International Federations of sport (IFs), National Olympic Committees (NOCs), National Governing Bodies of sport (NGBs) and the Organizing Committees for the Olympic Games (OCOGs); the relationship of the IOC with IFs, NOCs, NGBs and OCOGs; the sources of revenue for the IOC and other international sport organizations; concurrent governance between diverse organizations in Olympic sport on the international and national levels; the role of regulatory organizations including the World Anti-Doping Association (WADA), the United States Anti-Doping Agency (USADA), and the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS); the global governance of Paralympic sport; an examination of the Ted Stevens Olympic and Amateur Sports Act and event-specific legislation enacted by countries selected to host the Olympic and Paralympic Games; and dispute-resolution options in Olympic sport.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2450  Legal Skills Seminar  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
An in-depth examination of contractual theory, interpretation and enforcement combined with an examination of the theory of negotiation and creativity in developing solution-oriented processes for achieving results in sports, events and entertainment businesses. Topics to be covered include: valid contractual formation; rules of interpretation and conflict resolution applied by courts; rules of remedy and measures of damages; forms of alternative dispute resolution; the process of developing negotiating priorities and outcomes; BATNA and other theoretical processes and creative contractual provisions and terms and their enforceability.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2460  Antitrust & Collective Bargaining  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
An in-depth examination of the intersection between antitrust, labor law and the major professional sports leagues which operate as natural monopolies and as such, technical violators of antitrust laws. Topics covered include: antitrust and labor law and their application to the sports setting; the history of sports leagues violations of antitrust laws; and how sports leagues use a variety of legal exceptions to permit their activities. Students will also examine primary source material from the collective bargaining agreements of the major sports leagues.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2470  Professional Sports Franchises  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
An examination of the basic business unit of American professional sports, the individual franchise. Topics of discussion include: the nature of ownership; franchise exclusivity; rights vested in the franchise; the creation of local broadcast rights and the building of regional sports networks; the reasons for building and upgrading venues and facilities; revenue maximization; hiring of skilled professional staff; strategic pricing; customer knowledge and relationship strategies. Via a case study method, students will review the success and failure of a variety of sports franchises.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2480  Global Professional League Governance  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
This course is an examination of international professional sports leagues. Topics to be covered include: the structure of professional sport league governance across the globe; a systematic comparison of professional leagues in Europe, Asia Pacific, North and South America; challenges in governing professional sport in the age of globalization; the relationship between professional leagues in various international regions; the impact of American pro sport leagues expansion into other international region’s on the destinations pro sport leagues; an examination of marketing, public relations, licensing, sponsorship; and the sale of media rights as pro leagues expand into new international regions.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2500  Sports Media Strategies  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
An in depth examination of the different channels of media distribution necessary to adequately market and promote sports activities. Topics to be covered include: broadcast distribution of sports properties via rights fee as compared to time buy in all forms of traditional and digital media; the value of local and international endorsements; using media distribution for direct marketing or indirect public relations; the impact of new technology on sports media strategy formulation; and legal ramifications of defamation, false light and unfair use of proprietary material.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2500G  Sports Media Strategies  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course involves an in-depth examination of the different channels of media distribution necessary to adequately market and promote sports activities. Topics to be covered include: broadcast distribution of sports properties via rights fee as compared to time buy in all forms of traditional and digital media; the value of local and international endorsements; using media distribution for direct marketing or indirect public relations; the impact of new technology on sports media strategy formulation; and legal ramifications of defamation, false light and unfair use of proprietary material.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2520  Digital Media & Marketing in Sport  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
Digital media and marketing have become two of the most dynamic and growing sectors of the sport industry. Digital technology influences every part of the sport industry, which inspires innovation and change at a whirlwind pact. Digital weaves into other sport disciplines like marketing, PR, sponsorship, events, finance, facilities, etc. This course will focus on the latest trends and challenges in the digital sport world.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2530  Sport & Entertainment Packaging  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
Students will learn how to develop all the components necessary to package sports and entertainment events and to identify the components that are attractive to sought-after markets, as well as explore opportunities for combining sporting events with other local tourism services and attractions. Topics to be covered include: how supply is characterized by sport-event venues and the destination, services necessary to host visitors, opportunities for developing special promotions and entertainment products that can be used and enjoyed by visitors, spectators, and fans.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2540  Intellectual Property & Licensing  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
This course provides a survey of intellectual property (IP) law and how IP intersects with the sport industry. It covers what kinds of information and creations can be protected, when IP rights arise, who owns them, how rights are enforced, and why IP is so important in the context of the business of sport. We will examine the basic doctrines of the federal and state laws governing patent, trade secret, copyright, trademark, false advertising, and rights of publicity. For each type of IP, we will analyze its relevance to sport organizations, teams, leagues, events and athletes, and how the different types of IP can be monetized by those entities through licensing and other means. The course will introduce students to the fundamentals of licensing and its importance as a stream of revenue for many sport properties. Students will learn to identify, analyze, and negotiate the key provisions of a licensing agreement, and to drafting a basic licensing agreement.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2550  HOW BASKETBALL CAN SAVE THE WORLD An Exploration of Society, Politics, Culture/Commerce Through/game  (4 Credits)  
This interdisciplinary course will explore the game of basketball as a prism that uniquely and profoundly reflects and refracts major global social, cultural, political, and commercial issues. Students will learn the origins of the game from the ancient Mesoamericans and Mayans to its modern incarnation invented by Dr. James Naismith, a Canadian working in Massachusetts. Students will analyze the special properties and societal models inherent in the game -- individualist versus collectivist, socialistic versus capitalistic, structured versus expository – and why the sport has been a haven for social isolation, and the sport of “the other.” Students will explore why the game powerfully appeals to and influences indigenous peoples and immigrants, as well as urban and rural alike. The course will examine basketball’s influence and leadership on race, gender, and sexuality. Students will also see how basketball has served as a signpost for transformative trends in commerce and culture through areas like Hip-Hop music, fashion, sneakers, social media, and global iconoclasm (eg. Michael Jordan, Yao Ming.). Students will also learn about basketball’s role in struggles for national identity (eg. Lithuania, Israel, the former Yugoslavia). Finally, the course will understand the global popularity of basketball and its role as a 21st-century platform for diplomacy and peace (eg. Dennis Rodman and Kim Jong Un, US and China). (Counts as a liberal arts humanities course for all students)
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2560  The Psychology of Fandom  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course delivers an in-depth foundation of the aspects of the sport fan as a special category of a consumer by providing students with an understanding of the underpinnings of fans’ perspectives, attitudes, affinities, and reactions to their favorite teams’ successes and failures. Students will explore the psychology, sociology, and neuroscience of fandom while also learning about fan behaviors and their economic motivations.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2640  Ethical Issues in Sport  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
Ethical Issues in Sport is an examination of the role of sport in society as a vehicle for values and the ethical digressions that have created a negative perception of sport that permeates at all levels. This course is designed to challenge the student to explore their own ethical values and moral code as they learn the various ethical theories. Students will also be introduced to a philosophical inquiry as they explore specific ethical issues. This course will assist students in formulating an ethical perspective on current issues in sport and to explore how decisions they make can impact their careers.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 2650  Sociology of Sport  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
As a result of its escalating significance in contemporary society, sport has increasingly become a topic of public debate and policy concern. Sport sociology provides tools through which to develop informed insight into the matters that are at the foundation of contemporary policies and debates about sport. This course introduces students to the uses of sociological ideas and methods in the analysis of contemporary sport issues. A number of contemporary issues in sport are introduced in order to explore the application of sociological thinking, including socialization, deviance, violence, gender, ethnicity, social class, business, media, politics, education, and religion. Students are provided opportunities to develop perspectives on these issues that are informed by sociological research and theory. In order to explore the application of sociology to sport, students explore their own sport experiences using sociological concepts and methods. Students also learn to use the sport sociology literature to deepen insight into sport problems. In addition, students have an opportunity to apply sociological reasoning to the development of sport policy.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
TCSM1-UC 3010  Foundations in Sport Analytics  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
This course will be conducted in a discussion and quasi-lecture format. Using a flipped classroom approach, all students are required to have read the assigned readings prior to class in order to be prepared to fully discuss the pertinent subject matter for each class session. A mid-term exam will be given approximately halfway through the semester. The final exam will take place at the end of the semester and will be comprehensive. The course material will be applied using group work, discussion, homework assessments, and exams.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 3020  Marketing Research & Analytics  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course provides students with tools to undertake and critically evaluate sport marketing research. Using an applied approach, students will explore both qualitative and quantitative marketing-research tools, including the use of SPSS for data analysis. Students will complete an entire marketing research project, using the results to guide decisions for a real-world client. This course is particularly relevant for students interested in careers in consulting; sport product, service and brand management; and sport media and communications as well as for sport entrepreneurs.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 3030  Advanced Sport Business Analytics  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course prepares students to lead in analytics-driven sport organizations. Students will explore the capabilities and challenges of data-driven sport business decision making. The course will include hands-on work with data and software. Topics to be covered include data manipulation, predictive analytics, decisions under uncertainty, and decision analytics tools. Specifically, students will learn advanced analytics with R and Tableau.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 3100  Sport Broadcasting  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course will explore the interrelationship between sport and the broadcast media. Students will learn the fundamentals of various components of sport media, starting with the art of sports storytelling. Students will learn to write game and feature stories, writing strategies for broadcast, with a focus on active voice. Then, students will dive into the production side with a focus on internet streaming, shooting on location, anchoring, play-by-play, and the production of the various forms of sport media. The course will focus on the art of the story flow and how to keep the attention of the all-powerful consumer. This experiential course will offer students the opportunity to create and produce sport broadcast content.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 3120  From Field to Screen: Making the Sport Film  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course will explore the sport documentary filmmaking process by viewing a wide range of documentary films and discussing their attributes. Students will produce two documentary projects throughout the semester in teams of three to develop skills in conceptualizing, directing, and editing various styles of documentary films. Students will learn interview techniques), techniques for visualizing and shooting “b roll” footage, and how to construct narratives and stories through the integration of sound and images. Emphasis will be placed on developing technical proficiencies in hand-held cinematography, location sound recording, and editing. Finally, through screening and discussing a variety of significant sport documentary films, students will learn to define their own personal directorial approach to documentary filmmaking.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 3200  Champions  (2 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This is a course at the intersection of leadership and sports. It draws on the experiences of successful sports industry business leaders, star athletes, and coaches through conversations with Jonathan Tisch, co-owner of the NY Giants of the NFL and two-time Superbowl winning quarterback Eli Manning. These conversations will be analyzed and discussed in virtual meetings and assignments. Champions will cover topics ranging from the importance of team chemistry, the link between winning on the field and success in the executive suite. The course will address issues such as: aligning an organization/team around a common goal; building and sustaining a winning organizational culture; and race and gender issues in sport.
Grading: UC SPS Pass/Fail  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 3300  Entrepreneurship I: Incubator Phase  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Sports continued growth attracts attention from fans, sponsors, advertisers, and investors. This presents unique opportunities for innovative products and companies to launch in an energized marketplace to attract funding from a wide variety of sources. This course combines classroom instruction and experiential learning so that student groups can conceive, develop, and perform an early pitch an early-stage investment opportunity. Foundational knowledge about entrepreneurship will be combined with bespoke mentorship so that students obtain both theoretical and practical understanding of the various opportunities and pitfalls faced by new entrepreneurs. In this course, students will conceive and validate an idea, and position it in the marketplace.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 3310  Entrepreneurship II: Accelerator Phase  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Sports is a rapidly growing market attracting attention from fans, sponsors, advertisers and investors. This presents unique opportunities for innovative products and companies to launch in an energized marketplace and attract funding from a wide variety of sources. This course combines classroom instruction and experiential learning to help student groups who already have a clear product or service idea develop their idea into a marketable product or service for the sports community.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 3320  Entrepreneurship III: Iteration & Prototyping  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Building on the key concepts learned in Entrepreneurship I and II, students will learn how to engage in ideation, incorporate market research, and prototype a product. They will learn how these skills can inspire, inform, and bring depth to what will ultimately be developed into a tangible product or service. Students will learn how to design A/B tests, interpret results, think critically about their audience and processes. They will learn the value of lean thinking and agile/scrum management. Students will understand the importance of utilizing research in the development of their product or service. In this course, students will finalize their product/service pitch in preparation for presenting to investors and other resource providers.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 3410  Sport Event Planning & Operations  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This subject introduces students to the rationale for staging sport events and festivals and the conceptualization of events. The subject is designed to give students the knowledge and skills required to understand the bidding, sponsorship and planning processes of sport events as well as the marketing and operational aspects and needs of running events. Students will develop a sport event business plan.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 3420  Live Sport Event Management  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course will be conducted in a discussion, quasi-lecture, and workshop format. Using a flipped classroom approach, all students are required to have read the assigned readings prior to class in order to be prepared to fully discuss the pertinent subject matter for each class session. The course material will be applied using group work, discussion, homework assessments, and a live event.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 3430  Sports Tourism & Mega Events  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered not typically offered  
An examination of the development of sports tourism, including the challenges of developing and operating sports events and venues for mega events. Topics to be covered include: the historical development of events and venues; the nature of special mega events; the infrastructures of tourism events; the financial, facility, environmental, and planning aspects of large scale events; volunteer management; and the economic and socio-cultural impacts of sport tourism.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 3660  Sport Marketing  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer terms  
Examination of marketing concepts and methods available for sports businesses and sports events marketers. Topics covered include: the societal marketing philosophy; marketing research; market segmentation; and marketing mix strategies related to programming, distribution, pricing and promotion of sports and sporting events.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 3700  Sport Sponsorship Strategies  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Sport sponsorship is a key revenue generator for the sport industry. Given the importance, students require the skills to develop and pitch strong sponsorship packages for a sport property, sport event, and/or athlete to a potential sponsoring organization. Students will learn how to develop and value sponsorship packages, how to determine sponsor fit, and how these might vary for the target sport entity.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 3850  Internship  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer terms  
The internship class is an experiential learning activity designed to provide students with an opportunity to synthesize theoretical concepts learned in the classroom and with real-world experience in a professional work environment. Students are expected to complete a 300-hour supervised work experience approved by the Tisch Institute, during which they will have the opportunity to explore career options while obtaining practical experience within a business setting, building professional connections, evaluating various corporate cultures, and identifying additional skills necessary to ensure career readiness. As part of the academic element of the course, students will set written goals and objectives, engage in online discussions and other activities with their classmates, and complete a written self-assessment of their internship experience.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 3900  Independent Study  (1-4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer terms  
Provides an opportunity to work with a faculty mentor on a research project. Approved topics should be extensions of existing courses previously taken or knowledge areas in which no courses are offered. Independent research is intended to extend the student?s knowledge in an area in which his or her interest is more specialized than the norm. A written paper is required at the end of the project. Prior approval by an academic advisor as to the number of credits for which the student may register and the topic of the research is required.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
TCSM1-UC 3910  Business of eSports  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
The rise of esports has been an exciting development in the sport industry. This course will provide students with a detailed history of eSport to support their ability to analyze the sport environment to identify opportunities for future growth and development. Through an examination of the different modalities of play, platforms for streaming, competition types, and team/league organization, students will discuss the differences and similarities of traditional Sport in revenue potential and growth. By exploring the counter-culture of eSport and how it has created a global phenomenon that has changed the way we think about Sport, students will learn how the culture of competitive gaming has created opportunities for diversity, inclusiveness, and sportsmanship.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 3920  Sport Industry Thesis  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
The Sport Industry Thesis course is designed for students to complete an independent research study under the close supervision of the course instructor. Under the guidance of a faculty member, students will use skills homed in all courses leading up to the thesis research project, which is expected to combine research, writing, and analytical methods, to demonstrate expertise within a specific area of sport. Students will be expected to conduct a research study over the course of a semester and make a clear, educated final recommendation on how to solve, address or advance a key issue or problem within the sport industry. The thesis should contribute new knowledge to the existing work and research surrounding the industry issue or problem. The thesis, delivered in an extended written report along with a timed presentation, brings together the range of learning interest and outcomes accrued over the duration of study within the B.S. in Sport Management degree.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 3950  Emerging Issues in Sports Business  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
A review and analysis of important current trends and issues in sports through the perspectives of operations, marketing, finance, human resources, law, leadership, technology, and strategic management. Topics to be covered include: strategic thinking, sustainability, global perspectives, trend analysis, and practical business research. Students will work in teams analyzing the topic and develop a range of management strategies for a specific case or set of issues.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
TCSM1-UC 3955  Sport Technology & Innovation  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course aims to equip students with an understanding of the main issues in the management of technological innovation and an appreciation of the relevant skills needed to manage innovation at both strategic and operational levels. It provides evidence of different approaches based on real-world sport industry examples and experiences of leading sport organizations. This course will enable students to develop an understanding of analytic frameworks for managing the innovation process. Students will develop an ability to design innovation strategies that can successfully take advantage of innovation opportunities in the sport industry. They will also learn how to evaluate different options, formulate and develop strategy and assess and resolve challenges.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 9001  Introduction to Data Analytics  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered not typically offered  
The ability to analyze data has become an integral part of the decision-making process in the real estate, hospitality, and sports industries, as well as in businesses across the spectrum. Why has this particular skill set become such a valuable professional asset to have in your portfolio? It is used in building teams and in gauging the value of athletes in professional sports, in identifying new opportunities in real estate development, as well as in the management of hotels and tourist attractions around the world. It also is a key factor in the way companies do business on a day-to-day basis as well as in their long-term planning. This course will explore the applications of data analytics as a critical tool for success that goes beyond the boardroom, the amusement park, and the playing field. Topics will include: an introduction of key principles; data analytics in action; advancements in technology; employment opportunities in data analytics; and the importance of data in making business decisions. Guest lectures by thought leaders in this emerging field will enrich the classroom learning experience by bringing course content to life through discussions involving the application of data analytics in real-world scenarios. Course Takeaways - An understanding of key concepts in data analytics - The ability to utilize basic techniques for analyzing small- and medium-size data sets - An understanding of the ways in which to integrate data analytics into the decision-making process - The ability to use data to identify key trends in real estate, hospitality, tourism, sports, and other industries - The skills to develop elementary mathematical models that are used to study a sports franchise or a company's performance
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
TCSM1-UC 9901  Project Seminar: Introduction to Data Analytics  (1 Credit)  
Typically offered not typically offered  
In this one-credit seminar, students will engage more deeply with the subject of study as they apply what they learn in the class and field through hands-on projects. Each student will focus on a project that addresses contemporary industry challenges and real-world problem solving. This course is a corequisite to Introduction to Data Analytics.
Grading: UC SPS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No