Undergrad Social Work (UNDSW-US)

UNDSW-US 1  Society and Social Welfare  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
This course provides an overview of the social work profession. It orients the student to the value system and goals of social work and examines the various professional modalities of work with individuals, families, groups, and the community. Different agencies and fields of practice are presented with a focus on the role of the generalist social worker and the social service delivery system. Through guest speakers and special assignments, students have the opportunity to test their interest in, and suitability for, the field of social work.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 2  Skills in Interpersonal Communication  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered not typically offered  
This course promotes interpersonal sensitivity, observational skills, and beginning interviewing ability. Content includes the basic tools of intervention such as attuned listening, appropriate questioning and support, empathic understanding, and self-awareness. A variety of simulated and actual person-to-person situations are presented through utilization of audiovisual materials, field observations, and experiential exercises.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 11  Social Welfare Agencies and Organizations  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
The major goals of this course are to prepare students to act as knowledgeable, competent practitioners in developing, analyzing, and providing services and as informed, able participants in achieving social change. Content includes the history of social welfare and social work, the values and philosophical base of social work, public and voluntary auspices, models of governmental programs, and the professionalization of social work.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 12  Social Work Research  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
This course provides an introduction to social work research methods. The objectives are to provide an elementary understanding of the research process and to develop knowledge of the range of social work research. The course seeks to develop the skills needed for conducting small-scale studies and to enable future direct service practitioners to be intelligent consumers of research-based information. A basic introduction to quantitative methods and the use of computers is included.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 13  Social Welfare Programs & Policies  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
The course goals are to develop understanding and analytic ability regarding social problems, social policy and programs, and the field of social work. Content includes analysis of contemporary social problems, use of an analytical model to evaluate issues of eligibility, benefits, financing, and the delivery of social services. The role of the social worker in assessing and achieving organizational, systemic, and legislative change is examined.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 21  Human Behavior in The Social Environment I  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
This course centers on the biopsychosocial perspective that stresses a multidimensional view of human development and behavior. The focus is on the transactional relationship between human behavior and pertinent psychological, social, biological, economic, cultural, environmental, and institutional forces. Multiple theoretical perspectives are used to understand the behavior of individuals, families, groups, social networks, and systems. The role of social stressors such as poverty and oppression and their impact on human development are evaluated. All aspects of development and behavior are studied in the context of diversity. The life cycle stages of infancy and childhood are also viewed from a biopsychosocial perspective.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 22  Human Behavior in The Social Environment II  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
The focus is on the continuing evolution and expression of personal and social identity in the stages of the life cycle from early adolescence through old age. Concepts from ego psychology and social science that relate to various aspects of normal development, integration, and socialization in later life are examined, as well as theories of stress and crisis. The impact of social structure and processes on individual, familial, and work roles over time is emphasized throughout.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 25  Independent Study  (1-4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Students may engage in individual study under special circumstances. The independent work is approved if the student furnishes evidence of mastery of the basic content in the social work area selected. The work done by the student in this course is carried out with the guidance of a member of the faculty. This course is subject to availability of faculty.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
UNDSW-US 31  Social Work Practice I  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
The overall objective of this course is to provide students with an integrative framework that combines direct practice with individuals, families, groups, and communities with a commitment to organizational and social change. Students are helped to develop skills in a broad range of practitioner roles. The course examines the history, values, and ethics of the profession; the societal and organizational context of practice; and the impact of diversity and oppression. Skills in systems assessment, engagement, interviewing, collaboration and advocacy, relationship issues and self-awareness, and the practice principles of both crisis and extended intervention are taught. A social work laboratory component provides students with opportunities for experiential learning.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 32  Social Work Practice II  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
This course equips students with the knowledge and skills essential to the use of a range of social work modalities, including individual, family, group, community, and organizational intervention. Students learn to examine ethical and value dilemmas and to consider the practice implications of social work research. The course is designed to help students consolidate their social work identity and to prepare them for entry into generalist social work settings.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 40  Field Experience Lab  (5 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
Taken in the spring semester of the junior year, this course combines a direct agency-based experience, designed to introduce the student to the social worker's role and responsibilities, with a prepractice seminar. As part of this agency-based experience (approximately 100 hours), the student works under the supervision of a professional social worker. The prepractice seminar is designed to promote the student's adaptational skills in the field of social work. Using the student's field experience as a base, the seminar deals with the staffing patterns and staff collaboration procedures of social service agencies and the community's service delivery system. The seminar also focuses on aspects of the student's role in field work, including the supervisory relationship, process recordings, and expectations for field performance.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Pass/Fail  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 41  Practicum Instruction I  (6 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
Taken during the senior year (approximately 600 hours), these two courses provide students with opportunities to acquire skill in social work practice, to try out social work practice roles in the field, and to test in the field setting the theories and principles learned in the classroom. Students are assigned to social agencies or social work programs and learn by directly participating in the delivery of social work services under the supervision of professional social workers. Faculty advisement on both a group and an individual basis is an ongoing part of the field internship.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Pass/Fail  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 42  Practicum Instruction II  (6 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
Taken during the senior year (approximately 600 hours), these two courses provide students with opportunities to acquire skill in social work practice, to try out social work practice roles in the field, and to test in the field setting the theories and principles learned in the classroom. Students are assigned to social agencies or social work programs and learn by directly participating in the delivery of social work services under the supervision of professional social workers. Faculty advisement on both a group and an individual basis is an ongoing part of the field internship.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Pass/Fail  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 52  Society & Mental Health  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course will focus on policies, programs, clinical, ethical and legal issues that social workers encounter while working with the mentally ill in the community. The course will begin with a review of definitions of mental illness" from an historical perspective
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 53  Modern Families: Services to Children & Marginalized Households  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course provides an overview of supportive, supplemental, and substantive services for children and their families. Special emphasis is on funding patterns, the current legal structure and requirements, child welfare research and theories of child development (particularly those related to maternal deprivation and separation), and the implications for social work practice with children in their own homes and in foster care.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 54  Mindfulness  (4 Credits)  
Social justice and wellbeing are one and the same”- Dr. Sará Yafa King. How can you care for yourself while shaping change in a world that is overwhelmed with narratives, systems, and structures of oppression? In order to care for our communities, we must care for ourselves, self-regulating with the wisdom of the body. This course is designed to help you deepen your practice and share mindfulness with your community and with the world. We’ll begin with an introduction to mindfulness, examining the theory and science from its origins in wisdom traditions to the modern mindfulness movement, and move toward a meaningful practice that will allow you to better heal and serve.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 55  Diversity, Racism, Oppression and Privilege  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
The course centers on expanding the student's understanding of the meaning of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and culture, as well as the concepts of prejudice, discrimination, oppression, stigma, and stereotyping. Racism, particularly as it impacts on personal, professional, institutional, and societal levels, is studied. Special attention is given to the experiences of African Americans and Latino/as in U.S. society in general and in the New York City metropolitan area in particular. Within an integrative perspective, implications for direct and indirect social work practice are explored. Specifically, the importance of ethnoculturally competent practice for the individual worker and the design of service delivery systems are covered.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 56  Social Work Practice With The Aging  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course reviews the contemporary demographic, cultural, social, economic, and health conditions of the aging. Major social and psychological theories of aging are evaluated for practice and policy application. Approaches in assessing and helping the elderly and their families in community agencies and institutions are emphasized. Individual, group, and community work is examined with respect to the service network and to research on the developmental requirements of the aging.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 57  Advocacy & Community Organization in Soc Work  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
The overall objective of this course is to provide students with an integrative framework that combines direct practice with individuals, families, groups, and communities with a commitment to organizational and social change. Students are helped to develop skills in a broad range of practitioner roles. The course examines the history, values, and ethics of the profession; the societal and organizational context of practice; and the impact of racism and oppression. Skills in systems assessment, engagement, interviewing, collaboration and advocacy, relationship issues and self-awareness, and the practice principles of both crisis and extended intervention are taught. A social work laboratory component provides students with opportunities for experiential learning.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 59  Contemporary Families  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course conceptualizes the family as it exists today in its myriad forms. The course examines the stresses impinging on families. Special attention is paid to poverty, race and ethnicity, divorce and remarriage, adoption and foster care, and lesbian and gay families. The course explores different types of social service interventions with families. The impact of changing family patterns on welfare policy and programs is considered, as is the effect of social policy and programs on family structure.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 60  Social Work/Substance Abuse  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
This course describes major social and psychological theories relating to substance abuse. Special issues related to women, youth, the homeless, and dually diagnosed mentally ill/substance abusing populations are explored. Selected social policies and service delivery issues are considered.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 61  Social Work With The Chronically Ill /Dying  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course focuses on the psychosocial issues associated with chronic disease and terminal illness, examining their impact on the individual, the family, secondary survivors, health care workers, and the health system. Attention is given to the psychological processes of grief, dying, and death as these relate to life-threatening illness. Special emphasis is placed on the role of class, race/ ethnicity, and other cultural elements that shape individual, family, and community responses to illness and dying. The course examines issues of professional responsibility within the context of the health care delivery system. A substantive focus for the course is HIV/AIDS.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 62  Social Work - Family Violence  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
Family violence is an overarching term for many areas in the study of interpersonal abuse, aggression, and violence. This course will provide an introduction to the multiple aspects of the study of family violence and is intended to provide a foundational knowledgebase for further study in the context of social work practice, research, and policy. The course will cover both historical and current controversies and standpoints of family violence research, practice, and policy. This course is structured as a critical examination of family violence from a social work perspective. Family violence is a dynamic and complex issue, posing diverse challenges for clinical, legal, research, and policy professionals. A multidisciplinary approach to the study of abuse, aggression, and violence in the context of familial relationships including partner violence, child abuse, sexual abuse, elder abuse and sibling violence informs the basic structure of the course. Using a critical analysis framework that considers ethnicity, socioeconomic status, gender, disability, and sexual orientation in context, the course will cover topics including: the meaning, nature, and types of family violence; biological, psychological, and sociological theories that attempt to explain interpersonal abuse, aggression, and violence; the outcomes and consequences of violence; a range of family violence prevention and intervention strategies in clinical and judicial settings. The primary focus of the course is on the American family, though references will be made to other countries and cultures, particularly issues relevant to immigrant families.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 65  Homelessness in Perspective  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
The course will explore theories and causes of homelessness and the political, economic and social dimensions as well as the historical context. There will be emphases on special groups of the homeless including women, children, adolescents and people with mental illness and substance abuse. We will look at the policies affecting them, the role of social workers in relation to the homeless and the relevant research knowledge. Opportunities will be provided to gain first hand knowledge of the experiences of the homeless.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 66  Global Perspectives in International Social Policy  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
This course will introduce students to the overarching framework of international social policy and development with comparative references to developing and developed regions of the world. Emphasis will be on the identification of social, economic and political problems that impact those most vulnerable and disadvantaged by poverty, sex, age, disability or ethnicity; and will explore the development and implementation of global responses, public and private. Social policies, interventions, and solutions will be analyzed highlighting critical areas of poverty, human rights of children, gender issues including violence against women and trafficking, health including HIV/AIDS and non-communicable diseases, migration, and complex emergencies including conflicts, climate change and natural disasters.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 67  Radical Insight:Global Social Justice and Nonviolent Peacemaking  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
In the midst of the divisiveness of our recent election, notions of race, immigration, environmental justice, war and peace, terrorism, patriotism, and "peace" are complicated notions. In the midst of this national and global climate of tension and uncertainty, what does it mean to engage in the work of social justice and peacemaking? In the midst of an increasingly interconnected global community, where the disparity between the "haves" and "have-nots" continues to grow and the "99%" cry out for economic justice, what does it mean to live a life committed to peace and justice? To whom can we look for wisdom and guidance? In light of these questions, we will study the words and deeds, the stories, of many considered to be social justice laborers and peacemakers. We will question their motives and actions. We will ask one another how their work contributes to global justice and peace, and what they have to teach us as engaged citizens in our contemporary society. We will explore the foundational principles and practices that guide them. We will examine what they have to say to us and to our world today.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 68  Service Learning Through Community Engagement  (2 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
This course is offered as a co-requisite for student participation in a weekly community service opportunity. Students will provide (remote) afterschool tutoring for middle school and/or high school youth. The accompanying course will offer broad and general content related to students' service experiences. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the individuals with whom they are working and the contexts in which they live and learn. The course will touch on the fundamentals of engaging individuals in a helping situation; theories related to individual development; implications of race, ethnicity, culture and immigration; impacts of multiple social contexts: the family, peers, school, social agencies and community; understanding the effects of social oppression on people's lives: poverty, racism, sexism, classism, etc.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 69  Service Learning Through Youth and Community  (2 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
This course will be offered as a co-requisite to student participation in a weekly, remote tutoring opportunity. NYU students will provide tutoring for two hours weekly to middle and high school youth for the 7 week session. Students must be available to tutor in the late afternoon hours (U.S. time zone) since youth may be engaged in programming during the day. The accompanying course will offer broad, general content related to the service experience, focusing on the biopsychosocial aspects of the lives of the youth, specifically in our current context.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 70  Service Learning Through Visits W/Holocaust Survivors  (2 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
This 2 credit course complements a volunteer experience with Holocaust survivors. Students will conduct weekly visits with a Survivor and will have the opportunity to learn about the Holocaust and its impact on public life today and reflect on the experience of working with survivors. The weekly hour-long class will explore the social, psychological and historical effects of the Holocaust on the lives of survivors as well as the impact of the Holocaust on life in the United States.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 71  Service Learning Through Visits/Holocaust Surv.II  (2 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
This 2 credit course complements a volunteer experience with Holocaust survivors. Students will conduct weekly visits with a Survivor and will have the opportunity to learn about the Holocaust and its impact on public life today and reflect on the experience of working with survivors. The weekly hour-long class will explore the social, psychological and historical effects of the Holocaust on the lives of survivors as well as the impact of the Holocaust on life in the United States.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 72  Service Learning with Immigrant Youth  (2 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
This weekly one-hour course is offered as a co-requisite for student participation in a weekly community service opportunity with refugees. Emphasis will be placed on students. understanding of the individuals with whom they are working and the contexts in which they live and learn. Students will learn about immigration and resettling refugees. The course will touch on the fundamentals of engaging individuals in a helping situation; theories related to individual development; implications of race, ethnicity, culture and immigration; impacts of multiple social contexts: the family, peers, school, social agencies and community; understanding the effects of social oppression on people's lives: poverty, racism, sexism, classism, etc. Students will be expected to do journal writing and will have opportunities in class to share their experience. As part of their community service they will provide academic coaching and mentoring for refugees from such nations as Honduras, Yemen, Bangladesh, Moldova, Uganda, and Sudan for a minimum of two hours weekly at Brooklyn International High School. Times to be arranged by the school in conjunction with NYU student's schedules. Some students volunteer (remotely) in classes and some are assigned individual students.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 74  Racial, Gender and Environmental Justice Movements in Puerto Rico  (2 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This service-learning course explores gender and sexuality-based social justice movements, non- governmental organizations and queer cultures in the cities where New York University has study-away or satellite campuses. Its primary focus is to provide a theoretical backbone to understanding issues of gender and sexuality in a comparative paradigm between United States and international sites. The secondary purpose is to provide students with the opportunity to examine the interface between globalization and LGBTQ human rights across the NYU sites. In particular, using an academic approach (based on Advanced Qualitative Research Methods) that includes both the NYU Study Away Sites and the LGBTQ experience in those sites to systematically address what expectations NYU students, staff and faculty may have in regard to each of those NYU locations. This approach would be a resource to demonstrate strategies to manage being a queer or ally-identified person at any of the NYU sites; as well as being an opportunity to document and promote the realities of queer life across all the sites that make NYU the Global Network University.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 78  Service Learning through Engagement of Adolescent Youth  (2 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course is offered as a co-requisite to student participation in a weekly community service opportunity at The Door, an organization for adolescent youth whose mission is to empower young people to reach their potential by providing comprehensive youth development services in a diverse and caring environment. The accompanying course will offer broad and general knowledge related to the students’ service experiences. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the adolescents served by The Door and the contexts in which they live. The course will touch on theories related to adolescent development, implications of race, culture, gender and sexual orientation; impact of the social environment: peers, school, workplace, etc and the effects of social oppression on young people’s lives: poverty, racism, sexism, classism, homophobia. Students will have the opportunity reflect on their experiences in class discussion and in written assignments.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 79  What is Memory  (3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
The questions “What is memory?” and “What is forgetting?” have intrigued thinkers for millennia. Thanks to the written records that serve as our cultural memory, we know that memory has been a topic of inquiry at least since those records began. Today’s philosophers, psychologists, and literary scholars are continuing to hone the concept of the self as it was understood by John Locke, David Hume, and Ralph Waldo Emerson among others, as a dynamic tension between memory and consciousness. Together this work pursues such questions as “How is memory embodied?” How and why do we forget? What is the connection between memory and the self--and with language and story-telling-- and with moral and ethical reasoning? What events are best forgotten and how do we go about forgetting them? The proliferation of memorials of war and conflict today has led some cultural critics to wonder if so much remembering gums up the salve of forgetting so necessary for the healing process of forgiving. The course is structured around six units: Life Memories, The Idea of Memory, The Science of Memory, The Art of Memory, Cultural Memory, and Forgetting. Readings represent the full spectrum of western thinking about memory, from Plato to the Pew Research Center’s report on memory and the internet. It is hoped that in addition to learning a great deal about memory and forgetting as academic topics, students will come away from the course having gained new insights into the workings of their own memories and having developed a personal practice of memory that will serve their growth as individuals long after their memories of the course itself have dimmed.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 80  Revolutions and Revolutionaries  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Social science has often struggled to understand and define the change process. It is clearly complex and requires overcoming forces of both an internal and external nature. Individuals and societies will often work hard to sustain behavioral and cultural patterns that no longer serve them either personally or collectively. What in human nature compels us to resist change and what enables others to become revolutionaries? This course will examine the personal and cultural challenges the process of change presents. Through readings from the disciplines of philosophy, history, psychology, sociology and contemporary cultural studies the course will explore the process of change on the micro and macro levels and their relationship to each other. The course will also include the writings of revolutionary thinkers such as Marx, Che Guevara, Gandhi and Martin Luther King to gain insight into what enabled them to become revolutionaries and ultimately permit us to gain a greater understanding of how we may become agents of change ourselves.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 81  Social Justice, Religious Literacy & Civic Engagement  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
In the wake of political and economic polarization, environmental and public health crises, and ongoing racial reckoning and unrest, this course will examine the following questions: How do we define civic engagement? How do we define social justice? What theoretical frameworks help to shape our understanding and knowledge of these concepts? How do individual religious and spiritual leaders contribute to civic engagement initiatives? What is religious literacy and how do we measure it? Does religious literacy increase or decrease capacity for civic engagement? What role do institutions of higher learning play in promoting a deeper understanding of the intersection of spirituality, religion, civic engagement, and social well-being? What do current faith-based and civic movements for social justice in universities and communities nationwide have to teach us? In a world where notions of social justice, religion, spirituality, and civic engagement can mean very different things to different people and cultures, and in a world where religion and faith can be used to justify everything from civil rights movements to holy wars, students will engage in conversations about the role religion and spirituality play in contemporary and historical social justice movements. Students will have the opportunity to respond to course questions via small and large group conversations; interdisciplinary readings; reflection on current events; engagement with guest lecturers; weekly written reflections; and a final group project and presentation.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 82  Global Poverty  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
In spite of some hopeful signs, wide regional disparities and world poverty persist. In this class we will first examine the explanations for the world’s uneven development and the persistence of poverty. Then we will critically explore strategies and assumptions that governments and non-government organizations have employed to guide poverty reduction efforts. The role of culture, capital, and modernization will be critically evaluated. Finally, we will examine several poverty reduction strategies that are currently being used including foreign aid, capabilities and empowerment, social marketing, and microfinance, among others. We will draw from multiple perspectives to facilitate successful and integrated applied efforts and meaningful research questions.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 83  Social Deviance and Taboos  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
The nature of this course is to explore, review, and better understand what is considered socially deviant and taboo in society from a social work perspective. In this course students will explore how deviance and social taboos are defined, determined, and socially constructed, how deviance and taboos functions in society, the causes of deviance and taboo behavior, how those who are considered deviant manage their behavior and identities, how deviance is organized socially, how social, economic, and political power dictates who and what is deviant or taboo, and how some behaviors that were considered deviant and taboo historically have changed over time. This course will consider the criminal and non-criminal and the sexual and non-sexual ideas of deviance and taboos and pay close attention to cultural differences, rational interventions, and consequences of behavioral that is considered extreme or that falls outside of what is socially acceptable.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 84  Social Justice, Advocacy and Social Media  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
Social justice advocacy, to influence public policy and create systemic change, has evolved due to technological innovation. What in the 1960s and 1970s were protests in the streets has in the 21st Century turned into “liking” on FaceBook and following on Instagram and Twitter. This course examines how advocacy has changed over time with social media and how social media can be used as a tool to advocate for social justice and political change. We will pay special attention to oppression, power, and privilege and how this is manifested via social media. Case studies, theoretical readings, and activist literature will be used to understand how and which groups have successfully used media to advocate for social justice. Understanding the limitations, dangers, and access issues will be of paramount importance in analyzing how groups can use media advocacy in the future.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 85  Service Learning and Food Insecurity  (2 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
Students enrolled in the Food Insecurity service learning course will attend a weekly seminar and intern for approximately 3 to 4 hours a week with an organization of their choice to better suit their individual interests. This course will provide an overview of food insecurity within the U.S. and focus on the health, psychological and historical effects on individuals throughout the lifespan and vulnerable communities. Key knowledge areas that will be covered include: - The concept and history of food insecurity - Disparities within the food system - Formal and informal food assistance - Food policies and politics - Food justice and food sovereignty - The impact of COVID-19 on the food system
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 86  Ending Poverty  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
Description: This course examines the social, economic, and political dimensions of poverty and inequality in the United States. The course will offer a critical analysis of poverty and inequality with an analytic and descriptive focus on competing theories examining the causes of poverty, the role of policy, and socioeconomic dimensions of stratification, including race, ethnicity, class, gender, immigration status, and other factors. In this course, we will examine the existing and emerging policy issues related to ending poverty. Those policy issues include, although may not be limited to: 1.) Education and Human Capital Development; 2.) Health, Health Care, and Mental Health; 3.) Wealth and Asset Development; 4.) Housing and Community Development; 5.) Work and Employment; and 6.) Family and Social Structures. International perspectives may also be considered.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 87  Food Justice  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
Food used to be consumed to just sustain life, but now eating can have a political, cultural, and social meaning. Food (including how it is managed, thought about, and planned) reaches across cultures and into public policy and government health decisions. It also affects and reflects the philosophy, religion, and state-of-mind for individuals and families in society. This course examines the psychology and politics of food and eating, food purchase, and the role food plays in social norms and customs, social policy, human behavior, and mental health.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 88  Service Learning: Shaping Change: Spirituality, Service and Social Justice  (2 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Some of our greatest change-makers have been spiritual leaders, including Martin Luther King Jr., Dalai Lama, and Mother Teresa. What is it about faith and spirituality that motivates people to radically change their communities for the better? Join us as we explore the intersection of service, justice and spirituality through discussion, critical thinking, and on-the-ground community volunteering.​
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 89  Film, Literature and Mental Health  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
Artists often explore powerful issues of mental health through literature and film. "No form of art goes beyond ordinary consciousness as film does, straight to our emotions, deep into the twilight room of the soul." (Ingmar Bergmann 1918-2007) In this course, we will draw on classic examples from literature and film to highlight and understand aspects of mental health in ways that are more vivid and visceral than any text book can illustrate. Materials will be chosen from novels, poems, and films to illustrate various mental health issues, such as anxiety, depression, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), dissociative identity disorder (DID), and schizophrenia. We will look at how some of the disorders fare in psychological treatments that either succeed or fail. Guest speakers may be invited to highlight some topics.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 90  Love and Relationships  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
Making sense of love is a lifelong task. Love puzzles, agonizes, and exhilarates. It is the topic of philosophers and poets, high school students and college graduates, CEOs and grandmas. Looking for love can be a passionate focus and all-consuming goal. In this course we will answer the following questions: *What is the connection between love and sex? *Why do we repetitively pick the same "wrong partner?" *How do our own values and beliefs foster or inhibit love? *What are our own preconditions for loving? *What makes us overvalue or undervalue a loved one? *What do we project on others? What do we identify with?
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 91  Social Justice, Racial and Gender Equity Movements: Past & Present  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
#blacklives matter, blacktranslivesmatter, Occupy Wall Street, like other social justice movements, past and present, have sought to tackle issues of power, systemic oppression and bias in an effort to overcome inequality and injustice. This course will take a critical look at the role social justice movements have played as a means for social change here in the US and globally. Students will explore historical and contemporary social justice movements; investigate ideologies, tactics, and mobilization efforts. In addition, students will be exposed to introductory concepts and expected to engage in first-hand experiences to inform what intersectional movement building looks like.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 92  Youth and Adolescent Decision Making  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course focuses on adolescent decision making, emphasizing how “normal” adolescents make important decisions in their lives about sexual activity, relationships, drug and tobacco use, study habits, etc. The course provides an overview of major theories of adolescent decision making and teaches students how to use the theories to think about and design effective ways to reduce adolescent problem behaviors. The course covers state of the art research on adolescent decision making. Topics include positive youth development, cognitive influences in adolescent decision making, social influences on decision making, social image based influences on adolescent based decision making, emotional influences, self efficacy/perceived control, biological development and adolescent decision making, contextual influences, and impulsive/split second decision making. Students will learn a general framework for organizing and understanding how and why adolescents make decisions from a multi-disciplinary perspective.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 93  Professional and Interpersonal Communications Skills  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
This course focuses on developing the ability to communicate effectively in professional environments and interpersonal situations. The course provides an in-depth exploration and development of communication skills used every day inworkplace meetings, group settings, one-on-one encounters, and personal and professional relationships. Effective communications are explored, including making meaning and coding, verbal and nonverbal expression, effective listening strategies, managing relationships, cultural and international dynamics, learned communication skills, and ethical dimensions of communication. We will examine basic concepts, theories, and research about communication and how it is used in different forms of relationships. Lecture, discussion, in- and out-of-class observations, and “applied” assignments will be used to increase student skills and knowledge in communication.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 94  War on Drugs  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
This course critically examines the War on Drugs and the legal, political, and personal impact it has on individuals, families, communities, and countries. The intersectionality of race, class, sex, stigma, and the social policies and laws that underpin the drug war will be examined. Using readings and multimedia, course topics will investigate: Origins of prohibition, mass incarceration, racial disparities in the criminal justice system, legal medical and recreational cannabis, drug treatment, the therapeutic use of psychedelics, pregnancy and drug use, the US opioid-related overdose crisis, and the controversy over vaping nicotine. Alternatives to the War on Drugs using the framework of harm reduction will be explored. Drug policies and practices–heroin prescription, safe consumption sites, drug decriminalization–in Britain, Canada, and Portugal will be discussed and debated.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 95  Advanced Research  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
This is an advanced research seminar designed to give the undergraduate student a deeper understanding of research methodology through an applied approach. Students will work closer with the instructor to understand applied research and design and analyze their own research studies in collaboration with a research faculty member.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 96  Crime and Restorative Justice  (4 Credits)  
In this course students will be introduced to the philosophy, history, and implications of restorative justice as an alternative to the criminal justice system. Restorative Justice is a theory and approach that emphasizes repairing the harm caused by criminal behavior. Emphasis will be placed on current criminal justice policy and alternatives, the history and development of RJ as an alternative approach to retribution and incarceration, on the cultural influences of those using this approach, and on local, national, and international policies and models.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 97  Where Do You Come From? (Im-) Migration Discourses in Germany and the USA.  (3 Credits)  
This course is a global learning experience taught at NYU that is part of an ongoing collaboration between NYU Silver and RheinMain University of Applied Science (HSRM), Wiesbaden, Germany. Half of the students participating in the course will be NYU students, and the other half will be German social work students enrolled at HSRM. The course uses a cross-national and cross-cultural approach to examine the patterns of migration and immigration to the USA and Germany, the experiences of migrants, and how migration is differentially understood in these two countries. Fraser's Status Model of Recognition will be introduced as a theoretical framework for understanding migration discourses. Students will also learn how to use the research method of Photovoice to learn how views and narratives about the self and the other are constructed in social contexts. Students will reflect on the way meaning and constructions of difference, which are implicit in migration discourse, are connected to one's local biographical experiences and standpoint. The course will include several excursions to important New York City sites having to do with immigration.​
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 98  Shame, Accountability and Restorative Justice  (4 Credits)  
This course focuses on the fundamental principles and practices of restorative justice. Restorative justice refers to the damage done to relationships between people as well as within a community that have been affected by an incident of crime or wrongdoing in need of healing, support, and resolution. Restorative justice asks the person who has caused harm to be accountable for their actions and explore ways in which they can make things right. Those affected by the incident all participate in the restorative process with the goal of repairing the harm and promoting reconciliation whenever possible. Restorative justice approaches are currently being used in the criminal justice system, schools and community-based organizations to respond to conflict and harm. Students will be introduced to the roots of restorative justice and examine primary models of practice, as well as the concept of shame and re-integration. Emphasis will be placed on current and historical criminal justice policy and alternatives, the history and development of RJ as an alternative approach to retribution and incarceration, personal and collective accountability, on the cultural influences of those using this approach, and on local, national, and international policies and models. Students will learn fundamental skills in conducting restorative circles and restorative conferences.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 100  Maximizing the Global Advantage  (0 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
The course is a small discussion group meeting for 8 consecutive weeks during the spring semester, allowing current NYU undergraduate students who are planning to study at another global site the opportunity to participate in open and honest conversations in preparation for successfully meeting the challenges of studying in another culture. The course aims to create a safe space where students can participate in a developmental conversation about self-identity, cultural identity and global citizenship and to thereby increase students’ capacities for making meaning of their global experiences.The course is to be co-facilitated by trained and experienced graduate students in order to create a safe and welcoming atmosphere where members of the group can speak candidly about their experience with diverse cultures and their own personal and social identities.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Pass/Fail  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 101  Intergroup Dialogue: Race  (1-3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
Interested in engaging in dialogue around identity, diversity and social justice AND receiving course credit? REGISTER NOW to participate in the Intergroup Dialogue Program (IGD). IGD is a nationally recognized 1 to 3 credit course that brings together small groups of students from diverse backgrounds to share their experiences and gain new knowledge related to identity, diversity and social justice. This 10-week course is open to all NYU undergraduate students and topics include race, gender, sexual orientation and more. Once enrolled, you will be contacted to fill out your student profile and complete final registration steps. Feel free to email *cmep@nyu.edu <chanel.ward@nyu.edu> *with questions regarding the program.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 102  Intergroup Dialogue: Sexuality and Gender  (1-3 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
Interested in engaging in dialogue around identity, diversity and social justice AND receiving course credit? REGISTER NOW to participate in the Intergroup Dialogue Program (IGD). IGD is a nationally recognized 1 to 2 credit course that brings together small groups of students from diverse backgrounds to share their experiences and gain new knowledge related to identity, diversity and social justice. This 10-week course is open to all NYU undergraduate students and topics include race, gender, sexual orientation and more. Once enrolled, you will be contacted to fill out your student profile and complete final registration steps. Feel free to email chanel.ward@nyu.edu with questions regarding the program.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 103  Intergroup Dialogue: Global Gender  (1-3 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring term of odd numbered years  
Interested in engaging in dialogue around identity, diversity and social justice AND receiving course credit? APPLY NOW to participate in the Intergroup Dialogue Program (IGD). IGD is a nationally recognized 1 to 2 credit course that brings together small groups of students from diverse backgrounds to share their experiences and gain new knowledge related to identity, diversity and social justice. This 10-week course is open to all NYU undergraduate students and topics include race, gender, sexual orientation and more. You must APPLY via bit.ly/IGDFall2016 before you can be registered for the course. Email cmep@nyu.edu with questions regarding the program.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 104  Intergroup Dialogue: Disability  (1 Credit)  
Typically offered Spring  
Interested in engaging in dialogue around identity, diversity and social justice AND receiving course credit? APPLY NOW to participate in the Intergroup Dialogue Program (IGD). IGD is a nationally recognized 1 to 2 credit course that brings together small groups of students from diverse backgrounds to share their experiences and gain new knowledge related to identity, diversity and social justice. This 10-week course is open to all NYU undergraduate students and topics include race, gender, sexual orientation and more. You must APPLY via bit.ly/nyudialogue before you can be registered for the course. Email cmep@nyu.edu with questions regarding the program.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 105  Intergroup Dialogue: National Origin  (1 Credit)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
Interested in engaging in dialogue around identity, diversity and social justice AND receiving course credit? APPLY NOW to participate in the Intergroup Dialogue Program (IGD). IGD is a nationally recognized 1 to 2 credit course that brings together small groups of students from diverse backgrounds to share their experiences and gain new knowledge related to identity, diversity and social justice. This 10-week course is open to all NYU undergraduate students and topics include race, gender, sexual orientation and more. You must APPLY via bit.ly/nyudialogue before you can be registered for the course. Email cmep@nyu.edu with questions regarding the program.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 106  Intergroup Dialogue: Faith and Spirituality  (1 Credit)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Interested in engaging in dialogue around identity, diversity and social justice AND receiving course credit? APPLY NOW to participate in the Intergroup Dialogue Program (IGD). IGD is a nationally recognized 1 to 2 credit course that brings together small groups of students from diverse backgrounds to share their experiences and gain new knowledge related to identity, diversity and social justice. This 10-week course is open to all NYU undergraduate students and topics include race, gender, sexual orientation and more. You must APPLY via bit.ly/nyudialogue before you can be registered for the course. Email cmep@nyu.edu with questions regarding the program.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 107  Intergroup Dialogue: Faith and Sexuality  (1-3 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Interested in engaging in dialogue around identity, diversity and social justice AND receiving course credit? APPLY NOW to participate in the Intergroup Dialogue Program (IGD). IGD is a nationally recognized 1 to 2 credit course that brings together small groups of students from diverse backgrounds to share their experiences and gain new knowledge related to identity, diversity and social justice. This 10-week course is open to all NYU undergraduate students and topics include race, gender, sexual orientation and more. You must APPLY via bit.ly/IGDSpring2017 before you can be registered for the course. Email cmep@nyu.edu with questions regarding the program.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 108  Intergroup Dialogue: Race and Microaggressions  (1 Credit)  
Typically offered Fall  
Interested in engaging in dialogue around identity, diversity and social justice AND receiving course credit? APPLY NOW to participate in the Intergroup Dialogue Program (IGD). IGD is a nationally recognized 1 to 2 credit course that brings together small groups of students from diverse backgrounds to share their experiences and gain new knowledge related to identity, diversity and social justice. This 10-week course is open to all NYU undergraduate students and topics include race, gender, sexual orientation and more. You must APPLY via bit.ly/nyudialogue before you can be registered for the course. Email cmep@nyu.edu with questions regarding the program.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 109  Intergroup Dialogue: Whiteness and Privilege  (1-3 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Interested in engaging in dialogue around identity, diversity and social justice AND receiving course credit? REGISTER NOW to participate in the Intergroup Dialogue Program (IGD). IGD is a nationally recognized 1 to 2 credit course that brings together small groups of students from diverse backgrounds to share their experiences and gain new knowledge related to identity, diversity and social justice. This 10-week course is open to all NYU undergraduate students and topics include race, gender, sexual orientation and more. Once enrolled, you will be contacted to fill out your student profile and complete final registration steps. Feel free to email chanel.ward@nyu.edu with questions regarding the program.
Grading: Grad Silver Pass/Fail  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 110  Strategies to Reduce Inequality  (4 Credits)  
This course examines the historical and contemporary implications of inequality that have persisted especially in the United States, with some emphasis on other industrialized countries. In addition, this course will provide an overview of the causes and consequences of economic and social inequality and how it is reproduced throughout society. Using an intersectional perspective to better understand how various inequalities impact individuals, communities, and systems, this course uses a multi-disciplinary lens to explore complexities of inequality how it continues to be reproduced in society. Students will be challenged to analyze core tenants of systemic inequality and critically develop strategies to reduce inequality. Finally, students will gain the knowledge to analyze social, political, and economic inequalities within a holistic and historical context, while closely examining issues as that relate to the impact of systems based on race, gender, class, and sexuality.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 111  Service Learning: Alzheimer's Disease: Sharing the Lived Experience  (2 Credits)  
*In* this Service Leaning course, students will gain an understanding of Alzheimer’s disease through a semester-long, one on one relationship with a person in the early stages of the disease. Students will meet with the person they are matched with once a week in their home for a couple of hours of conversation, or a walk, a trip to a museum or any other activity that is planned together. A one hour weekly classroom component will augment the volunteer experience by providing the content to inform the students about issues of aging and dementia from a medical, psychosocial and public policy standpoint.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 112  Lobbying, Legislation, and Social Action  (4 Credits)  
This course is designed to introduce undergraduate students to how legislation works, lobbying, and taking social action through a social welfare and social work lens. The course examines the role of political lobbying, coalition building, and messaging at the local, state, and federal levels of government. Social action is the process that builds from grassroots organizing to the engagement and partnership between constituents and elected officials. Students will identify a social need (based on different social policy areas) that are unmet, underfunded, or newly realized. They will formulate their message/argument and culminate these findings into action-oriented policy briefs.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 113  Human Biology for Social Work  (4 Credits)  
This course examines key issues related to human biology with an emphasis on its usefulness in social work and social welfare. The course explores the structure and function of the human body at both the cellular and organismal levels, but also helps students understand those elements from a “a person-in-environment” perspective. Students will be introduced to concepts related to evolutionary biology, human physiology, medicine, global health, and epidemiology. Further, this course uses an evolutionary, biocultural framework to understand how adaptation to various ecological and structural stressors affects the human body. Required for Social Work Majors*
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 114  Diversity, Racism, Oppression and Privilege for Non Social Work Majors  (4 Credits)  
The Diversity, Racism, Oppression and Privilege (DROP) for nonmajors course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to develop the theoretical knowledge, skills, attitudes and self-awareness needed to engage in social-justice oriented encounters at the micro, mezzo and macro levels. Students learn a critical race theory and anti-racist framework to examine living and working in a diverse society and explore how the effects of racism, oppression, and privilege have functioned currently and historically. The DROP course provides opportunities for students to reflect on their own social identities (i.e., intersection of race, class, culture, gender expression, religion, sex, sexual identity, abilities, age, migration status, etc.), and social locations (including sources of power, privilege, marginalization and oppression), and the effects of these on their worldview and on their personal and professional relationships.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 115  Leading for Social Change: Foundations and Practices of NYU  (2 Credits)  
The purpose of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to grow as leaders in the context of active citizenship by learning how to facilitate the NYU Alternative Break curriculum. This social justice education and service-learning experience serve as a foundation to deepen one's understanding on how social change occurs on individual, community, and nationwide levels. With a foundational belief that change happens in all fields and sectors, this course hopes to equip students with the skills needed to ensure they are able to contribute to a positive impact on society. This education is critical to understanding the complexities and systemic attributes to today's most pressing social problems. Through education, direct service, and reflection; students will be able to grow as leaders while supporting the communities they engage with on their NYU Alternative Break.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 116  First Year Impact Seminar I  (0 Credits)  
The first year impact seminars are required for all entering Social Work majors. They are special no-credit courses for first year students to enhance their academic and social integration into college. The FYIS introduce the nature of higher education, social work and social welfare, career, critical thinking, and a general orientation to the functions and resources of the university. In these seminars, students start a portfolio process that will help them move forward in their academic life and career. FYIS encourage students to participate in thoughtful, critical, and intellectual reflection and conversation as they hold meaningful discussions, exploration, and inquiry into whom they are and who they will become.
Grading: Non-Credit Pass/Fail  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 117  Women's Health and Community Well-being  (3 Credits)  
In this course, students will be an active part of an ongoing research study that includes implementing interactive workshops and leading focus and discussion groups on women's health and resilience, reproductive health, domestic violence, and community economic development, among other issues. Students will be trained to work with local residents, conduct qualitative interviews, collect data, lead discussion groups using a curriculum, and fully engage with the community members. Students will acquire basic knowledge and skills for conducting community evaluations and community needs assessments using community-based participatory action and collaborative ethnographic techniques. During the first two weeks of the course students will be dedicated to learning a curriculum focused on qualitative data collection and in multiple forms, facilitation, community engagement, and policy implementation. The final sessions will include students and community members in an analysis and goal priority setting process. Other strategies included will be writing field notes, conducting one-on-one interviews, and qualitative data analysis.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 118  First Year Impact Seminar II  (0 Credits)  
This is part two of the first year impact seminars which are required for all entering Social Work majors. They are special no-credit courses for first year students to enhance their academic and social integration into college. The FYIS introduce the nature of higher education, social work and social welfare, career, critical thinking, and a general orientation to the functions and resources of the university. In these seminars, students start a portfolio process that will help them move forward in their academic life and career. FYIS encourage students to participate in thoughtful, critical, and intellectual reflection and conversation as they hold meaningful discussions, exploration, and inquiry into whom they are and who they will become.
Grading: Non-Credit Pass/Fail  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 119  Service Learning: The Lived Experience of Unhoused Adults  (2 Credits)  
Undergraduate students enrolled in UNDSW-US 65 Homelessness in Perspective have an opportunity to earn an additional 2 credits by volunteering a minimum of 2 hours a week at a local agency that works with homeless individuals. Silver will coordinate this volunteer opportunity for the students. Open only to those enrolled in UNDSW-US 65 Homelessness in Perspective.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 120  Transfer Student Impact Seminar I  (0 Credits)  
The transfer student impact seminar (TSIS) is a required course for all undergraduates transferring (to include both internal and external transfers) into NYU Silver as a social work major. The TSIS is designed for transfer students to enhance and support their academic and social integration into Silver. The seminar is a foundational course that introduces students to the nature of higher education specifically at Silver, social work values, critical thinking, and a general orientation to the functions and resources housed at Silver. In these weekly seminars, with a focus on building community and engagement, students will receive guidance regarding academic advisement, important dates/deadlines, as well as ongoing exposure to supports found at Silver available to students.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Pass/Fail  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UNDSW-US 9110  Inequality  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
This course examines the historical and contemporary implications of inequality that have persisted especially in the United States and other key industrialized countries around the world. In addition, this course will provide an overview of the causes and consequences of economic and social inequality and how it is reproduced throughout society. Using an intersectional perspective to better understand how various inequalities impact individuals, communities, and systems, this course uses a multi-disciplinary lens to explore complexities of inequality how it continues to be reproduced in society. Students will be challenged to analyze core tenants of systemic inequality and critically develop strategies to reduce inequality. Finally, students will gain the knowledge to analyze social, political, and economic inequalities within a holistic and historical context, while closely examining issues as that relate to the impact of systems based on race, gender, class, and sexuality.
Grading: Ugrd Silver Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No