UG Pub & Nonprofit MGT and Pol (UPADM-GP)

UPADM-GP 101  The Politics of Public Policy  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
This course provides an introduction to the political institutions and processes through which public policy is made and implemented in the United States (although the key concepts are applicable to other political systems as well). The course also introduces students to the tools of policy analysis. The first half of the course presents the major models of policymaking and policy analysis. The second half of the course applies these concepts to specific policy areas such as health, education, and environment, as illustrated by real-world case studies. The course emphasizes written and oral communication through the development of professional memo-writing and presentation skills.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 102  Introduction to Social Impact  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
September 11 brought a dramatic surge in what Americans expected of themselves and their civic institutions. Americans reported increased interest in all aspects of public life, including voting, volunteering, and careers in government. Three years later, however, the interest has yet to produce a parallel increase in civic activity. This course will provide undergraduate students an opportunity to examine the promise of public service embedded in American history and contemporary events, while exploring the perils of participation that may explain the public's reluctance to actually engage. The course will also explore competing definitions of public service, as well as proposals for increasing civic engagement through various forms of national service, including the draft. The course will feature occasional guest lectures by leading public servants in New York City, as well as student research on just what public service means today.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 103  Introduction to Managing Public Service Organizations  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
The goal of this course is to introduce you to management skills for potential service in the public and non-profit sectors. The course provides you with tools to diagnose and solve organizational problems, to influence the actions of individuals, groups, and organizations, and to lead impactful public service organizations. You presumably choose this course because you want to have a positive impact in the world. Your interest could be affordable housing, more bicycle lanes, arts programs for disadvantaged kids or access to quality pre-natal care. It could be making sure public policies are based on the best possible evidence, or that nonprofits are financially solvent, or that staff are treated fairly and respectfully. Whatever your passion, you can only realize that impact by mastering organizational processes. Organizations are the way work gets organized, coordinated, and accomplished. Knowing how organizations work – how to work within them – are perhaps the most powerful tools you can have. A key management task is to assemble the skills, talents, and resources of individuals and groups into those combinations that best solve the organizational problems at hand. You must manage people, information, and processes to accomplish organizational goals; you must make things happen, and often not under conditions or timeframes of your own choosing; and you must learn from the challenges you experience. The successful execution of these tasks requires leaders to understand what skills and abilities they bring to and need from their teams and organizations, to formulate a mission and strategy, to make effective and ethical decisions, to recruit, influence and motivate diverse individuals, to optimize the structure of their organization, to measure and improve performance, and to drive organizational change. The course prepares you to achieve these objectives by providing you with fundamental frameworks and tools developed from the behavioral and social sciences and tested by leaders in organizations representing all sectors of the economy. In addition to lectures, the course includes readings and analyzing case studies, engaging in role-playing exercises and a semester long team project to design and create the components of a virtual nonprofit organization. Student teams will be 3-5 students, and will require team time in addition to scheduled course hours.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 111  Quantitative Analysis for Public Policy  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course introduces students to basic statistical methods and their application to management, policy, and financial decision-making. The course covers the essential elements of descriptive statistics, univariate and bivariate statistical inference, and introduces multivariate analysis. In addition to covering statistical theory the course emphasizes applied statistics and data analysis. The primary goal of this course is to introduce these basic skills and encourage a critical approach to reviewing statistical findings and using statistical reasoning in decision making.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 120  Normative Issues in Public Policy  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course examines tensions among competing values in the formation and implementation of public policies. Applying normative theories of democracy, justice, efficiency, and equity, students will examine a variety of domestic and international cases in which these ideals conflict and become objects of politics. Our objectives are (1) to understand the important trade-offs that underlie and shape public policies in a variety of settings and (2) to develop a framework for evaluating public policies against a set of normative criteria. The course should prove valuable for any student interested in a better understanding of why "good" policies are so elusive in a variety of institutional contexts.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 140  The Economics of Public Policy  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
The Economics of Public Policy analyzes the impact of public policy on the allocation of resources and the distribution of income in the economy. In this course, you will learn how to use the tools of microeconomics and empirical analysis to answer these questions: When should the government intervene in the economy? How might the government intervene? And, what are the effects of those interventions on economic outcomes? The course will include topics such as: income distribution and welfare programs, taxation and tax reform, government debt, market failures, Social Security, unemployment insurance and health insurance.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 209  The American Presidency  (4 Credits)  
The past five years have forced a national reexamination of the institution of the American presidency. And the effect has been traumatic. Allies of former President Trump celebrated the disruption of presidential “norms” in support of populist ideals. Supporters of President Biden bemoaned the disappearance of those “norms” and saw, especially on January 6th 2021, the threat that a resurgent “Imperial Presidency” posed to American democracy and its constitutional system. This course will introduce students to the evolution of the presidency, especially its phases in the modern era. Besides providing an historical context for the 45th and 46th presidencies, the class will examine the nuts and bolts of the most powerful executive position in the World. What role have modern presidents played in shaping our economy, our institutions, our environment and the global system? Are there any limits on presidential power at home and abroad? How were these limits established and, under our constitutional system, can they be undone? How have the nuclear and digital ages and this extremely partisan moment affected those powers? What role does the character or personality of the incumbent play in the functioning or effectiveness of a presidency? More specifically, to what extent have modern presidents added to, lessened or simply ignored the racial, social and environmental injustices and economic disparities that tarnish and contradict the promise of this country’s founding documents. The core objective of this course is to assist students in acquiring the knowledge and analytical skills to assess any American presidency and understand its role in shaping the United States and the wider world.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 215  The Politics of New York  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
This course will provide undergraduate students with an understanding of the political and governmental processes that influence New York City. The course will explore the structure of the municipal government, the role of the mayor and city council, the way in which state and regional agencies affect public services, and the role of the media in the political life of New York City.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 217  Sustainable Urban Development  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
This course examines the social, economic and environmental dimensions of sustainable urban development. Some of the major themes explored include indicators of sustainability, urban demographic trends, environmental justice, green building, urban sprawl, sustainable energy and transportation, and global climate change. In addition, the role of information technology (IT) and social networks is discussed in the context of promoting ideas globally about sustainable development.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 219  Segregation and Public Policy in the American City  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
The intertwined public health, economic, social and political crises facing cities have brought renewed attention to entrenched racial inequality and oppression in the United States, particularly anti-Black racism. Students in this course will develop a critical understanding of causes and consequences of racial inequality in America with a focus on spatial inequality, racial segregation, and concentrated poverty in cities. We will start by contextualizing the current political moment with an exploration of the role public policy played in creating and perpetuating urban inequality. We will then focus on the continued consequences of spatial inequality and racial segregation on individual and community well-being and the significance for contemporary policy issues, spanning political representation and voting rights, to gentrification and displacement, policing, and inequality in access to quality education, healthy neighborhoods, and employment. We conclude with the visions for a more just and equitable future articulated by activists, scholars, and front-line community groups. This course will draw on classic academic materials on American urban history, contemporary research, multimedia such as podcasts and music, and investigative and data journalism.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 226  Leadership: Women and Public Policy  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
Women have engaged and been represented in public service in America through their fearless Women's Suffrage movement to gain the right to vote, which officially began in the 19th century, in 1848, during the Seneca Falls Convention, where the first women's rights convention, was held and was triumphantly realized in the early 20th century After a hard-fought series of votes in the U.S. Congress and in state legislatures, when the Nineteenth Amendment became part of the U.S. Constitution on August 20, 1920. To date, however, it is recognized, the road to elected and appointed office for women leaders is not equitable for those seeking to serve in public office. Although women make up the majority of our American population, women are the majority of registered voters and women graduate college at higher rates than men from post secondary education institutions; women are only a fraction of our elected and appointed officials. Statistics, big data analytics tell the sobering story. This course will teach offerings which underscore "Leadership, Women and Public Service in American Cities" charting the course and exploring the experience of women and girls in public service leadership. We will examine the context of equity for women in the structural realities and gender attitudes within the American political and civic systems. Our students will connect with women leaders and advocates for women leaders; we will teach women’s historic and contemporary participation in public service. Utilizing political and Intersection theory we will focus on trends, implications and impact of ethnicity, race, class, gender & religion on women in politics and public service. Through coursework, guest speakers and hands-on activities students will learn how they can be a participant in and influence the public agenda through public service, politics and impacting public policy. The coursework will review leadership skills-set, career paths and analyze barriers that have traditionally kept women from achieving their political and leadership potential.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 229  Intersection of Politics and Public Policy  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
Public service is often studied or practiced in ways that are disconnected from politics. This course reunites these two realms in ways that persuasively demonstrate the deep interconnection of non-governmental service work and practical politics. Taught by a veteran of White House, foundation, nonprofit, and private sector organizations, this class will explore the complex nature of public service in even the most charged political contexts. The course will use case studies, historical examples, and fascinating guest speakers.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 231  Managing Innovation In Health Care  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course is aimed at students intending to work as clinicians or as managers in the health care industry. In this course, students will: understand how health care organizations operate, the contexts they face; the opportunities and constraints facing those who wish to innovate in health care organizations; how healthcare organizations are governed and managed; examine successful innovations implemented in healthcare organizations; understand how to motivate workforce in healthcare organizations; and improve writing, presenting, and listening skills.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 236  Topics in Health: Policy, Politics and Power  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
Health care now constitutes almost 15f the U.S. economy. The broad range of issues involving health care and health care delivery are at the center of national and local policy debates: Disparities in access and outcomes for vulnerable populations; right to control decisions about treatment and about dying; medical malpractice; the adequacy of the evidence base underlying medical decisions; the pharmaceutical industry and its role in health care and politics; the impact of an aging population; and coping with accelerating health cost. This course is an introduction for undergraduate students to the major policy issues affecting health care and examines the role of government in the health care system. An important focus of the course is an assessment of the role of policy analysis in the formation and implementation of national and local health policy. Because much of government health policy relates to or is implemented through payment systems, several sessions involve some discussion of the policy implications of how government pays for care. The role of the legal system with respect to adverse medical outcomes, economic rights, and individual rights is also discussed. Proposals for health policy reform at the national and local level are examined throughout the course, with an emphasis on Medicare and Medicaid reforms currently being implemented or considered.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 238  Gun Violence in America: Public Health, Politics, and Pragmatism  (4 Credits)  
More U.S. residents have been killed with guns since 1968 than died in all the wars since the country’s founding. Addressing this crisis means solving tenacious public health problems in the realms of science and of politics. In this course we will review the epidemiology of gun violence and the empirical foundations of efforts to address it through policy, study design, programmatic interventions, and environmental/physical design. We will consider obstacles to the rigorous study of gun violence as well as the innovative approaches researchers have adopted to overcome them, whether in the fields of epidemiology, medicine, criminology, or economics. And we will place all of this in the political and legal context that shapes our collective actions. Through lectures and discussion, students will become familiar with the main factors connected with firearm injury, the study of gun violence, the policy actors that have influenced the U.S. response to date, and the underlying beliefs and behaviors that define the U.S. relationship with guns.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 239  Truth, Accountability, and Reparations  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
The global movement for truth, accountability, and reparations has a history that begins with the human rights movement in Latin America and includes (ongoing) struggles to address genocide, human rights abuse, and crimes against humanity in countries as diverse as Liberia, East Timor, Argentina, South Africa, and the United States. This course will be an intensive immersion in questions of truth and accountability, providing students with the tools necessary to understand and critically evaluate initiatives around the world. We will begin with a theoretical introduction to core concepts such as truth, accountability, memory, justice, reparations, and guarantees of non-repetition, including both historical examples (South Africa, Peru, Chile, Argentina, Morocco) as well as more current initiatives (e.g. Canada, Colombia, the United States). The course format will include a combination of lectures, film and video, and participatory exercises.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 242  The Business of Nonprofit Management  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
This course is a general introduction to nonprofit management, with heavy emphasis on practical application. How do not-for-profit organizations actually function? How do they attract “customers?” How do these companies grow when there are no owners with financial incentives to grow the business? What are the core elements of a “good” not-for-profit company? What are the metrics for determining the health of a company without profit? And, what, exactly does not-for-profit even mean?
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 249  Religion, Conflict Transformation, and the Future of Democracy  (2 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
A 2022 NPR/Ipsos poll found that 64% of Americans believe U.S. democracy is "in crisis and at risk of failing." What is our role in preventing that failure, and how can we reimagine public service and conflict negotiation in order to transform and uphold the country and the world that we want to live in? This class will explore ideas around religious and civil conflict, intergroup relations, conflict negotiation, restorative justice, belonging, and boundary drawing. Students will learn about the ever-expanding public sphere, the limits of tolerance, and the possibilities of emergent leadership while gaining crucial real-world skills for public service.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 251  Legal & Ethical Approaches to Islam  (2 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
In this course, we will study “shari’ah,” the primary legal and ethical tradition of Islam. First, we will briefly cover the historical development of shari’ah. Then we will turn to the contemporary era, and examine the articulation of shari’ah in regard to a variety of concrete issues. It is hoped that by the end of the course, the student will have a greater appreciation for the complexity of shari’ah, and its continued relevance in today's legal and ethical debates both nationally and internationally.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 254  Multi-Faith Leadership in the 21 Century  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
In the context of an increasingly polarized American society, this course seeks to train students to mobilize diverse faith communities together for the greater good. Unleashing the power of their own story, students will articulate their values and explore the ways it can be shared. The course will draw on case studies from historical and contemporary faith leaders who have achieved success in creating sustainable change, as well as interrogating relevant current affairs as they arise. Students will learn to recognize how stories are used to motivate action, to recognize the ways that race, power and privilege play a role in elevating and downplaying stories and to identify the role values play in motivating action.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 255  Spiritual and Ethical Approaches to Islam  (2 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
Spirituality & ethics is an integral segment of every religious tradition, along with sciences like that of theology and jurisprudence. In recent yearsIslamic spirituality has often been described as somehow separate from Islam itself. In this course we will investigate the historical origins of Islamic spirituality and look at a sampling of the major concepts and figures from pre-modern tradition. Finally, we will turn to the continued importance that spirituality and ethics has played in the contemporary Muslim-majority world, with a special focus on Islamic tradition in North America.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 260  What Really Matters? Leadership with No Regrets  (2 Credits)  
In study after study, people lying on their deathbeds overwhelmingly say they regret five things at their end of their life: 1. Not living a life of authenticity 2. Working too hard at the expense of their relationships 3. Not having the courage to express their feelings 4. Not staying in touch with friends. 5. Not letting themselves be happier. For leaders, it's not any different. This course unpacks each of these "regrets" with readings, exercises, meditation, deep listening, skill development and leadership theory, examining historical and contemporary answers to the question of what really matters in life, and providing the space for students to grapple with the question themselves.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 265  Fundamentals of Social Entrepreneurship: Problem Solving and Innovation  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
Using “business as a force for good”, social entrepreneurs implement innovative private sector approaches to solve social, cultural and/or environmental problems. Surviving start-up and scaling to maximize impact is both an art and a science, especially when attempted without outside investments. Statistics show that approximately 10% of small businesses surpass $1 million in revenues, while only 0.5% surpass $10 million. Fundamentals of Social Entrepreneurship will draw upon the real-life successes and challenges faced by the professor and other social entrepreneurs in structuring and scaling their enterprises. Students will read several articles, watch videos and complete group projects to experience the launching and scaling of their own social enterprises.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 267  Social Entrepreneurship Incubator & Practicum  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course is designed for upper-class undergraduates who have a social innovation project, entrepreneurial business, or CSR idea to develop or implement. Also welcome to the course are students who would like to learn and practice success skills and employment strategies, and are willing to participate in class teams with other students who have project ideas. To bring the dynamic world of social innovation fully into the classroom, this course will provide: business leadership training and the skills to develop a clear social vision and values, viable business-modeling practices and feasible financial projections— i.e. how to structure an organization for different funding strategies, practice in pitching and promoting an idea, and tips on launching a start-up with social impact. Classes are enhanced with expert guest teachers and speakers, case studies and experiential exercises. This course will help students develop their individual or team projects, workshop how to create maximum social impact after graduation, build their resumes and develop critical skills for the process of finding or creating their future jobs.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 269  How to Change the World: Advocacy Movements and Social Innovation  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
How does someone go about changing the world? What does social change theory suggest are the most effective tactics to change hearts and minds? What can we learn from the past about what it means to be an effective agent of change? How have social entrepreneurs created organizations that become engines of change? How has technology, social media and trends in mainstream media changed the rules of the game? This course will focus on social change theory and explore social movements in post-WWII America, including: the movement for Black civil rights, the LGBTQ+ Movement, Environment/Climate Activism, the Women’s Movement; the Conservative Movement, Corporate Social Responsibility and social entrepreneurship, Immigration, Healthcare, Journalism, Whistleblowing & Hacktivism, and the Free Speech movement.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 282  Moving NYC: Travel Behavior and Policy in New York City  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
From the non-stop subway ride to the “infamed” jaywalking, from the well-acclaimed Citi bike to delivery on almost anything, from the iconic yellow cab to the fist fight over a parking spot, from the Chinatown bus to congestion pricing, this course investigates the kaleidoscope of travel behavior by New Yorkers and their essential connection to the functionality of the City. It explores the unique transportation infrastructure behind these behaviors as well as the policies and rules that provide them and regulate their usage. Through this behavior—infrastructure--policy loop, this course encourages students to decipher the complexity of urban travel and think about innovative and effective interventions to induce, mandate, or even “manipulate” the right travel behavior for a sustainable and equitable urban future.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 284  Emergencies, Disasters, and Cities  (4 Credits)  
This course introduces students to the discipline of emergency management to better understand the urban planning and public service approaches necessary to prepare for, respond to, recover from and mitigate future emergency and disaster impacts. Focusing primarily on natural disasters, the course uses case study examples and recent events to expound upon the historical and conceptual frameworks that have and continue to shape this field. The course also includes assessments of social and individual behaviors that serve as a foundation for understanding how people act in disasters and how behavioral changes may save lives and property.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 429  Intersection of Politics and Public Policy  (2 Credits)  
In a complex and difficult world, some idealism is needed to energize meaningful change. This course is for aspiring policy-makers who want to combine a necessary sense of optimism with real-world understanding of how to get things done. Each session will focus on specific examples of how practical solutions were found to seemingly intractable problems.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 430  Intelligence and National Security Policymaking  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Whether as an action agency or a source of analysis or raw material, the intelligence community is a key but little understood participant in the policymaking cycle. This course introduces students to the contemporary intelligence community and its role in shaping US national security policy, providing students with a hands-on appreciation of the role of intelligence through participation in class simulations of case studies of national security policymaking.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 1011  Statistical Methods  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course introduces students to basic statistical methods and their application to management, policy, and financial decision-making. The course covers the essential elements of descriptive statistics, univariate and bivariate statistical inference, and introduces multivariate analysis. In addition to covering statistical theory the course emphasizes applied statistics and data analysis, using the software package, SPSS. The course has several "audiences" and goals. For all Wagner students, the course develops basic skills and encourages a critical approach to reviewing statistical findings and using statistical reasoning in decision making. For those planning to continue studying statistics (often those in policy and finance concentrations) this course additionally provides the foundation for that further work.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 1022  Introduction to Public Policy  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
The course begins by distinguishing policy analysis as a subdivision of the social sciences concerned with explaining government behaviors from policy analysis as a professional activity in the public service concerned with assembling and presenting information to guide decision makers in the public and nonprofit sectors. The course concentrates on policy analysis as a professional activity and presents students with the conceptual approaches that facilitate successful analytic work. The course consists of team-taught lecture sections and individual faculty-rThe course begins by distinguishing policy analysis as a subdivision of the social sciences concerned with explaining government behaviors from policy analysis as a professional activity in the public service concerned with assembling and presenting information to guide decision makers in the public and nonprofit sectors. The course concentrates on policy analysis as a professional activity and presents students with the conceptual approaches that facilitate successful analytic work. The course consists of team-taught lecture sections and individual faculty-run discussion sections that provide opportunities for students to practice oral presentation skills.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 1603  Urban Planning Methods and Practice  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
The political and institutional environment within which planning occurs. The relationship of planning to political and market processes, the structure of urban and regional political systems, and alternative strategies for planning in urban communities.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 1605  Land Use Law: The Planning Perspective  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Legal and administrative aspects of regulating land use at various levels of government, and understanding the changing legal framework of the regulations such as zoning, urban renewal and eminent domain, inverse condemnation, landmarks and aesthetic controls, environmental laws, growth management and the relationship of the planner to the law.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 1620  Introduction to Urban physical Design  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
An introduction to the issues in urban physical design and the vocabulary and skills of urban designers and other physical planners. Emphasis is on techniques and approaches to understanding and interpreting the physical environment, primarily in urban settings.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 2110  Strategic Management  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course examines management theory and practice through a framework involving strategic thinking and strategic planning. It covers a number of important management topics, including the context of strategy, leadership, managerial uses of structure and design, and performance. Case studies of managerial practice in the public and nonprofit sectors are used throughout the course.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 2135  Developing Human Resources  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Designed for public and non-profit managers rather than human resource professionals, this course gives a broad overview of HR dynamics and responsibilities. It will cover basic HR functions such as recruitment, career development, performance appraisal and rewards, providing feedback and job design. It will also explore current issues within HR management, which could include diversity and identity at work, the role of unions, or other topics. The course will include practical application through case discussions and reflection on students? work experiences. While it will focus on values-based organizations, it will compare HR practices in the public, non-profit and for-profit sectors.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 2170  Performance Measurment & Management for Public, Nonprofit & Healthcare Org  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
All public and not-for-profit organizations must assemble and report information on their performance. The need for performance measures goes beyond legal and regulatory requirements. To provide services effectively and efficiently, managers need information to make decisions. This course focuses on what performance measures are needed, how they should be created and what forms of communication are most effective.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 2202  Politics of International Development  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course provides students with a rich sense of the institutional and political context within which policy is made and implemented. The course aims to give students exposure to important ongoing debates in international development and their historical context. The class will provide an overview of some of the major contemporary analytical and policy debates regarding the politics of development. Topics to be covered are: States, Regimes and Industrialization; Politics of Poverty, Growth and Policy Reform; Governance, Civil Society and Development; and The Politics of Development in the Age of Globalization.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 2203  International Economic Development  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course takes up issues of economic growth and social change in a comparative perspective. While some countries have achieved unprecedented rates of economic growth in the past half century, other countries have experienced setbacks. For those that have seen rapid growth, economic changes have not always translated in proportional social changes and sometimes rapid social changes have occurred in the absence of economic growth. The course begins by reviewing theories of economic growth and recent evidence. In that context, attention then turns to policy interventions to improve education, address market failures, confront rapid population growth, and strengthen safety nets.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 2608  Urban Economics  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course introduces students to the economic forces that shape the spatial development of cities and metropolitan areas. The course examines why cities exist and why some grow more quickly than others. It also explores the location choices of households and firms within metropolitan areas and the resulting land use patterns. Finally, the course examines the spatial aspects of a variety of urban policy issues, such as poverty, segregation, urban decay, crime, congestion, and pollution. Assignments involve the analysis of census data for the New York metropolitan area.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 2660  History and Theory of Planning  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Describes and analyzes the evolving pattern of urban and metropolitan development in the United States and provides a historical perspective on the origin and values of city planning and the urban planning profession. Students examine alternative theories of planning and the changing role of the planner in the policy-making process and, through readings and class discussion, gain an understanding of the way in which federal, state, and local policies influence urban and regional development.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 4130  Fundamentals of Accounting  (2 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
The purpose of this course is to provide participants with essential skills of financial accounting. This course delves into many of the specific techniques related to generating financial information. Topics include debits and credits, the recording process (including double entry accounting, T-accounts, journal entries, adjusting entries, closing entries, and financial statement preparation), accounts receivable (including allowances for bad debts and aging schedules), inventory (including LIFO/FIFO, periodic versus perpetual, and lower of cost or market), and depreciation methods. This course is designed for people who need to understand the details of financial accounting and is not appropriate for people seeking to understand the broader issues of financial management.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 4830  Health Economics: Principles  (2 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course provides the core microeconomic theories and concepts needed to understand health and health care issues in both the developed and developing world. It describes how the markets for health and health services are different from other goods, with a particular emphasis on the role of government and market failure. In addition it discusses the theoretical and empirical aspects of key health economics issues, including the demand for health and health services, supply side concerns, health insurance, the provision of public goods, and related topics. The course encourages students to fundamentally and rigorously examine the role of the market for the provision of health and health services and how public policy can influence these markets.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 4833  Health Care Management I: Control and Organizational Design  (2 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course is designed to study how to manage in and lead health care organizations (HCOs). Topics covered will include: the use of evidence-based management in health care, how health services are governed and organized, particularly in non-profit organizations, how performance control systems work in health care organizations, management of acute and chronic care delivery systems, and models of accountable health care systems.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 9101  The Politics of Public Policy  (4 Credits)  
This course will provide a broad and dynamic introduction of the American political system and public policy. The course will 1) investigate the dynamics, ideas, values, and traditions that support American politics and the policy process 2) examine the actions of citizens and voters that make that influence public policy 3) study the institutions and actors that comprise the American political system, particularly, the three major branches of government (executive, legislative, and judicial) and the fourth estate (the media) and how policy and constitutional tensions involve political and moral choices (4) explore the critical role played by political communications (i.e. language, strategy, research, social media, digital tech) throughout our political and policy process. The course will place critical emphasis on the “DC advantage”, leveraging our location in the nation’s capital by studying our topics through the unique lens of proximity and applied practice. While this class will study various theoretical academic issues, it will also attend closely to how these theories play out in practice. Students will be challenged to think critically and to execute, at times, real-world examples relevant to the policy and political process. The ultimate goal of the course is to provide a comprehensive understanding of the American political system and overview of public policy in a constitutional democracy that includes a robust theoretical and practical foundation.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
UPADM-GP 9221  The Meaning of Leadership  (4 Credits)  
This course will be the academic component of your internship or other experiential learning engagement. You will analyze contemporary leadership frameworks and develop your perspective on what it means for leadership to be ethical, inclusive, and collaborative. You will use the seminar to reflect critically and analytically on your experience to further your academic and professional goals. You will be asked to evaluate various aspects of your internship or experiential learning site, including but not limited to its mission, approach, policies, leadership culture and the local, regional and international contexts in which it operates. You will also be asked to reflect critically on the roles you take and your application of class learning in your internship or experiential learning placement throughout the semester. Hands-on course activities such as simulations, team projects and peer-to-peer consultancies will support you in developing self-awareness and critical leadership skills. You will be graded on the academic work produced in this course.
Grading: Ugrd Wagner Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No