Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies (MEIS-UA)

MEIS-UA 101  Elementary Arabic I  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Elementary Arabic I course is a novice level course in Modern Standard Arabic. (MSA) The course work aims to balance the four skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). It also introduces aspects of Arab culture. The course is designed to teach students to pronounce, read and write MSA. Fall semester starts with Arabic alphabet (letters and sounds) then introduces topics such as greetings, self introduction, family, weather and food. No prior knowledge of Arabic or a placement test is required for enrollment in this course.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 103  Intermediate Arabic I  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Builds on the skills acquired in Elementary Arabic I and II, with increased emphasis on writing and reading from modern sources, in addition to aural/oral proficiency.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 104  Intermediate Arabic II  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This is a high intermediate level course designed to bring the intermediate level students to an advanced level of proficiency. The course expands on communication skills, cultural understanding, reading, listening comprehension and writing skills. Students are able to discuss general topics and express opinions in Modern Standard Arabic. Emphasis is placed on reading authentic materials. Topics typically covered include: College life & education, relationships, immigrants, arts and films, diglossia in Arabic. Placement test or completion of Intermediate I is required for enrollment in this course.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: (MEIS-UA 103 OR ARABL-UH 2110).  
MEIS-UA 301  Elementary Urdu I  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course sequence is based on the integration of learning outcomes across Interpersonal, Interpretive, and Presentational Modes of Communication. The emphasis is on the development of the literacy skills (reading and writing) and the aural skills (listening and speaking) through a variety of interactive class, small-group, and paired activities, project- and real life-based tasks. Learners gain familiarity with products, practices, and perspectives of the Urdu speaking communities and their cultures. Students learn basic grammar and vocabulary to meet functional performance goals at the Novice level and to build a foundation for continued language learning. During this course, students generally perform in the Novice range, although in the case of the Urdu heritage language learners, a few abilities may emerge in the Intermediate range especially in the aural skill. Read more.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 302  Elementary Urdu II  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course sequence is based on the integration of learning outcomes across Interpersonal, Interpretive, and Presentational Modes of Communication. The emphasis is on the development of the literacy skills (reading and writing) and the aural skills (listening and speaking) through a variety of interactive class, small-group, and paired activities, project- and real life-based tasks. Learners gain familiarity with products, practices, and perspectives of the Urdu speaking communities and their cultures. Students learn basic grammar and vocabulary to meet functional performance goals at the Novice level and to build a foundation for continued language learning. During this course, students generally perform in the Novice range, although in the case of the Urdu heritage language learners, a few abilities may emerge in the Intermediate range especially in the aural skill. Prerequisite: Elementary Urdu I (MEIS-UA 301). Read more.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 303  Intermediate Urdu I  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Continues where Elementary Urdu leaves off. The students are introduced to literary texts. Along with specific language tasks, criticism and analysis now form part of the curriculum. Dictation, memorizing poetry, comprehension, and engaging in longer sessions of conversation form an important part of this course. By the end of this course, students should have achieved some fluency in reading literary texts, writing short essays, and carrying on a conversation.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 304  Intermediate Urdu II  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This sequence is focused on the development of the four skills (reading, writing, speaking and listening) through class- and small-group activities, text- and film-based, individual and team projects in the three modes of communication. Students accomplish real-world communicative tasks in culturally appropriate ways through Urdu as they explore products, practices, and perspectives of the Urdu culture(s). Students learn more complex grammar and vocabulary to enable them to meet functional performance goals at this level and to equip them for continued life-long language learning. Students perform consistently in the Intermediate range while a few abilities may emerge in the Advanced range, especially in the case of Urdu heritage language learners. Prerequisite: Intermediate Urdu I (MEIS-UA 303).
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 401  Elementary Persian I  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Conversational and formal Persian with a focus on grammar, phonetics, and pronunciation of modern standard Persian through reading simple fiction, nonfiction and poetry as well as social media and the news. Writing short compositions and engaging in everyday conversations with an emphasis on the four skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 402  Elementary Persian II  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Conversational and formal Persian with a focus on grammar, phonetics, and pronunciation of modern standard Persian through reading simple fiction, nonfiction and poetry as well as social media and the news. Writing short compositions and engaging in everyday conversations with an emphasis on the four skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing. Prerequisite: Elementary Persian I (MEIS-UA 401).
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 403  Intermediate Persian I  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Builds on the skills acquired in Elementary Persian I and II through continued study of grammar and syntax. Practice in spoken Persian. Introduction to classical and modern prose and poetry.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 404  Intermediate Persian II  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Continuation of Intermediate Persian I (MEIS-UA 403) which serves as the prerequisite. Further work in grammar, syntax, and speaking. Introduction to classical and modern prose and poetry. This course satisfies the College Core Curriculum's foreign language requirement.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 405  Elementary Hindi  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
MEIS-UA 405 This course sequence is based on the integration of learning outcomes across Interpersonal, Interpretive, and Presentational Modes of Communication. The emphasis is on the development of the literacy skills (reading and writing) and the aural skills (listening and speaking) through a variety of interactive class-, small-group, and paired activities, project- and real life-based tasks. Students gain familiarity with products, practices, and perspectives of the diverse Hindi-speaking communities and their culture(s).They learn basic grammar and vocabulary to be able to express themselves in simple and memorized language about everyday personal topics. Thus they meet functional performance goals at the Novice level and build a foundation for continued language learning. Students generally perform in the Novice range, although in the case of the Hindi heritage language learners, a few abilities may emerge in the Intermediate range especially in the aural skills. Read more.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 406  Elementary Hindi II  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course sequence is based on the integration of learning outcomes across Interpersonal, Interpretive, and Presentational Modes of Communication. The emphasis is on the development of the literacy skills (reading and writing) and the aural skills (listening and speaking) through a variety of interactive class-, small-group, and paired activities, project- and real life-based tasks. Students gain familiarity with products, practices, and perspectives of the diverse Hindi-speaking communities and their culture(s).They learn basic grammar and vocabulary to be able to express themselves in simple and memorized language about everyday personal topics. Thus they meet functional performance goals at the Novice level and build a foundation for continued language learning. Students generally perform in the Novice range, although in the case of the Hindi heritage language learners, a few abilities may emerge in the Intermediate range especially in the aural skills. Read more.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 407  Intermediate Hindi I  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Designed to further develop fluency in oral and written communication. In addition to the class, small-group activities, and language and computer lab sessions, students are given an individual assignment to work with native speakers from the community and report on their findings. The reading assignments are designed to broaden understanding of content used for oral presentations.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 408  Intermed Hindi II  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This sequence is focused on the development of the four skills (reading, writing, speaking and listening) and is based on the integration of content, culture and language. Students perform in the three modes of communication as they explore products, practices, and perspectives of the diverse Hindi speaking communities and their culture(s). Students learn more complex grammar and vocabulary through class- and small-group activities, text- and film-based, individual and team projects. They learn to express themselves on topics related to the community and the world, and thus meet functional performance goals at this level and are equipped for continued life-long language learning. Students perform consistently in the Intermediate range while a few abilities may emerge in the Advanced range, especially in the case of Hindi heritage language learners. Prerequisite: Intermediate Hindi I (MEIS-UA 407) or equivalent.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 409  Advanced Hindi I  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Offers an overview of Indian culture via original texts and is designed to improve students' advanced-level reading, as well as their written and oral discourse in Hindi. Emphasis is placed on the development of linguistic skills required for a close reading and in-depth analysis of complex texts. Introduction is learner-centered, and students have a choice in the selection of the texts and topics for their presentations. Taught seminar-style, the course combines classroom discussions, oral reports, and occasional background lectures. Students should have completed the two-year sequence of Hindi or have an equOffers an overview of Indian culture via original texts and is designed to improve students' advanced-level reading, as well as their written and oral discourse in Hindi. Emphasis is placed on the development of linguistic skills required for a close reading and in-depth analysis of complex texts. Introduction is learner-centered, and students have a choice in the selection of the texts and topics for their presentations. Taught seminar-style, the course combines classroom discussions, oral reports, and occasional background lectures. Students should have completed the two-year sequence of Hindi or have an equivalent background.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 410  Advanced Hindi II  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course is designed to further develop students’ proficiency in Hindi language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) at an advanced level and it aims to increase students’ awareness and ability to use the Hindi language in different settings and registers. Emphasis is placed on the application of complex grammatical structures, vocabulary expansion, and cultural understanding through authentic materials and contexts. The goals of this course are to offer opportunities for students to report about current events, create narratives and arguments, express opinions and participate in debates about different issues related to Indian culture, literature, history, politics and economy. The focus is on developing higher proficiency through a variety of texts, articles related to Indian economic, historic, social and cultural issues and short stories by Premchand, Yashpal, Kamleshwar, Susham Bedi and other writers. Online resources and selected movies will be used to address the variety of topics. Read more.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 501  Elementary Turkish I  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Students develop basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in Turkish while building grammatical knowledge and vocabulary.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 503  Intermediate Turkish I  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Materials from Turkish newspapers, magazines, literature, and radio provide the basis for reading comprehension and conversational ability in modern Turkish.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 504  Intermed Turkish II  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Students develop complex grammatical skills and vocabulary to enhance speaking, reading, listening and writing proficiency with the goal of engaging with both everyday and abstract topics. Prerequisite: Intermediate Turkish I (MEIS-UA 503) or equivalent.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 518  Topics in Middle Eastern History:  (4 Credits)  
Advanced undergraduate course that focuses on specic issues in Middle Eastern history. Topics vary each time it is offered.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 616  Topics in Islamic History  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Topics vary by semester.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 640  The Making of The Muslim Middle East, 600 - 1400  (4 Credits)  
A historical and comparative approach to the first half millennium of Islamic history. Course traces the cultural and religious strands shaping the institutions, belief systems, and practices. Using primary sources, students explore the major debates in the cultural history of this period.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 650  Ottoman Empire and the World Around It  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
The Ottoman Empire, renowned for its enduring presence in world history, held sway over vast regions spanning Eastern Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa for over six centuries. This course embarks on a comprehensive journey, tracing the empire's evolution from its origins as a frontier principality in Anatolia in the 14th century to its tumultuous trajectory through the centuries as a global powerhouse, ultimately culminating in its dissolution in the 20th century following the conclusion of World War I. As we delve into the course material, we will explore how the Ottoman Empire's political, economic, and social structures underwent profound transformations, shaping the lives of its diverse inhabitants. Simultaneously, we will contextualize the Ottoman imperial experience within the broader global context, considering its enduring impact on Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa, both past and present. Topics encompass pivotal areas such as state and identity formation, military encounters, technological advancements, environmental considerations, urban and rural life, religious and ethnic diversity, gender roles, family structures, legal systems, and developments in fields ranging from science to art and architecture. Throughout the semester, we will enrich the learning experience with complementary materials, including movies, documentaries, fictions, and field trips, to gain a holistic understanding of the Ottoman Empire's multifaceted history and legacy.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 660  Mediterranean Worlds  (4 Credits)  
Identical to HIST-UA 131. Offered every other year. This course focuses on the territories around the Mediterranean Sea, once united by the Roman Empire, after their division into three major cultural zones: Latin Christendom, Byzantium, and Islamic dynasties. Despite linguistic and religious differences, the people of these zones were in constant interaction with each other. Focusing on the period from roughly 900-1600, this course traces these interactions through primary sources translated from Latin, Greek, Arabic, Hebrew and the languages of Western Europe, alongside material culture.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 688  Topics in Modern Middle Eastern History  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Topics vary by semester.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
MEIS-UA 690  The Emergence of The Modern Middle East  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Surveys main political, social, economic, and intellectual currents of the 20th century. Emphasis on historical background and development of current problems in the region. Topics include imperialism, nationalism, religion, Orientalism, women, class formation, oil, the Arab-Israeli crisis, and the Iranian revolution.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 697  Palestine, Zionism, & Israel  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course is a survey of the history of Palestine in the modern period, focusing on the conflict for control of this land from its origins in the late nineteenth century until the present. The purpose of this course is to examine the evolution of this ongoing struggle in its historical context and to try to understand why the various parties to this conflict have thought and acted as they did.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 703  Islam in the World  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
This course focuses on the ways in which Islamic belief and practices are taught, comprehended, debated and experienced in daily life in communities of Muslims across the contemporary world. We study the different forms such practices and beliefs take in the context of societies, cultures, histories and political economies of varying kinds, from the Middle East to Indonesia, from West Africa to India. We examine wide-ranging debates among Muslims about what is orthodox and what is unorthodox, what is permitted and what not, how children and adults should be taught to "be Muslim" and what an ethical Muslim life really is in our complex and conflict-ridden world. Reading materials centers on anthropologists' close study of communities and groups across the Muslim world today.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 708  Modern and Contemporary Arabic Literature  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Landmarks of Modern and Contemporary Arabic Literature Significant prose works (in translation) of the Arabic literary tradition from approximately the last hundred years are considered through the prisms of their multiple contexts—including, but not limited to, historical, social, cultural, gender, and class—and also examined as works of art.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 710  Masterpieces of Medieval Arabic Literature in Translation  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Survey of the masterpieces of Arabic, Persian, and Turkish literature from pre-Islamic times to the present. Selected texts in translation from the major genres, both in prose and poetry, are studied as works of art in themselves and as a reflection of the societies that produced them.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 711  Literature & Society in the Middle East  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Selected works in translation of leading 20th-century poets, novelists, and short story writers that reflect changing conditions and mores within Middle Eastern and North African societies. Investigates such topics as conflicts between traditionalists and modernists, the impact of urbanization on rural societies, and the existential dilemmas of men and women.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 716  The Arabian Nights  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
The Arabian Nights have been an essential and dynamic literary meeting point between Arabic/Islamic literature and the Western canon. This course examines both sides of this cultural dichotomy. Literary analysis of the tales includes close reading of the structure of the original as well as modern variations by authors such as Poe and Rushdie.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 717  South Asian Literature  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course introduces students to a selection of writings in various Indian languages (Bengali, Punjabi, Hindi, Urdu, Malayalam, Rajasthani. etc.) available in translation in English. The focus of this course is on the representation of gender and sexuality, as well as its relation to other factors such as class, caste, religion or ethnicity and how the depictions are mediated particularly through emerging fictional conventions in prose writing. The course begins with pre-independence texts and then moves on to the narratives of Partition. As the cultural and historical contexts are examined within which literature has evolved in South Asia, emphasis is also placed on the voices of women and the role they play in the development of literary movements. Finally, contemporary texts are analyzed to gain a broader understanding of how tradition and modernity are embedded in South Asian literature with emphasis on gender representations. Read more.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 718  Introduction to Ancient Indian Literature  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
An introductory course designed to acquaint students with the great works of the ancient Indian literary tradition, a major part of which was written in Sanskrit. The earliest form of that language, called Vedic Sanskrit, is the language of the Vedic hymns, especially those of the Rig Veda. Sanskrit has had an unbroken literary tradition for over 3,000 years. This rich and vast literary, religious, and philosophical heritage is introduced in this course. In addition, students work with excerpts from the Jain and Buddhist canons written in Prakrits and examples of Tamil poetry. Selections from the Vedic literature, classical drama, epics, story literature, and lyric poetry are studied in English translation.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 720  Middle Eastern Literature  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Offerings (which may vary) focus on one or more Middle Eastern literary traditions and/or cultural traditions and/or genres of writing, using a thematic or theoretical approach.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 728  Women and Gender in Islam  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Investigates the complexity of the messages and models relating to gender in one of the world's most influential religious traditions. Beginning with the rise of Islam and sampling primary and secondary sources from a range of times and places, examines how foundational texts and personalities are interpreted and reinterpreted for changing times.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 729  Gender,Identity,&Society in The Middle East  (4 Credits)  
By exploring the history of the region and different theories, this course examines how social cleavages have been created and maintained in the Middle East and North Africa. It will focus on several categories such as gender, sect, religion, and class.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: (SCA-UA 401 OR V97.  
MEIS-UA 747  Arab Theatre & Film:  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Examines recent trends in contemporary Arab theatre and film, contextualizing these within a broader history of Arab performance. Particular attention is given to how experimental practitioners have explored issues of human rights and the control of territories under the modern state. Strategies addressed include the conflation of the past and present as a means of exploring the persistence of the colonial power structure in the modern Arab world; the use of the parable to speak truth to power; the incorporation of the populist entertainment forms that directly engage the audience; and the use of familiar tales to explore new political realities.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 750  Politics of The Middle East  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Historical-political background of the Middle East and its contemporary social and political problems, including the impact of the West; religious and liberal reactions; conflict of nationalisms (Arab, Iranian, Turkish, and Zionist); and revolutionary socialism. Specific social, political, and economic problems?using a few selected countries for comparison and analysis?including the role of the military, the intelligentsia, the religious classes, the legitimization of power, urban-rural cleavages, bureaucracy, and political parties.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: POL-UA 500 AND Restriction: (Academic Plan = Middle Eastern & Islamic Studi-MA OR Middle Eastern & Islamic Studi-MA/PH OR Middle Eastern & Islamic Studi-MPHIL OR Middle Eastern & Islamic Studi-PHD OR Middle Eastern Studies-BA).  
MEIS-UA 751  Topics in Mideast Politics:  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Topics vary by semester.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: (MEIS-UA 690 OR MEIS-UA 750).  
MEIS-UA 757  Travel Literature  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Topics: “imaginative geography”; Greek versus Barbarian; the Hajj; Orientalism, Occidentalism, and ethnography; transnationalism in relation to class and gender; tourism; migrant workers; and exile and narratives of return. Representations of travel in different genres and contexts.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 780  Islamic Law & Society  (4 Credits)  
Introduces students to Islamic law through a reading of its various genres and a study of a selection of secondary sources covering a number of substantive topics (for example, ritual, criminal, and public law). Also focuses on the ways Islamic law has interacted with Islamic societies in historical practice and the way it has adapted, or not adapted, to the challenges of modernity.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 781  The Qu'Ran and Its Interpretation  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
An introduction to the content, themes and style of the Qur?an and surveying the diversity of interpretive approaches to the text (legal, mystical, sectarian, literary, and politically engaged) in the medieval and modern periods.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 782  Tpcs in Islamic Studies  (4 Credits)  
Topics vary by semester.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 785  Sociology of Religion: Islam & the Modern World  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course is designed to explore the role of religion in modern societies. We will examine religion as an important social institution and also as a cultural system. We will study canonical and contemporary theories of religion (Marx, Durkheim, Weber, Dewey, and Geertz). The focus of the course, however, will be Islam. We will look at the cultural context and historical construction of Islam, as well as the different social contexts within which Islam has evolved. We will examine the relationship between Islam and modernity, including secular ideologies, gender politics, and modern democracy. We will pay particular attention to the role that Islam plays in the everyday life of those who practice it, who are affected by it, or who struggle with it as their tradition. Our goal is to study Islam not as a fixed object or authentic tradition but as a social and cultural phenomenon subject to change, contestation, and critique. Texts may include John Dewey, A Common Faith; Karen Armstrong, Islam: A Short History; Fatima Mernissi, Islam and Democracy; Leila Ahmed, A Quiet Revolution: The Veil's Resurgence, from the Middle East to America. Elizabeth Fernea, and In Search of Islamic Feminism.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 796  Iran Past and Present  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course delves into Iran's complex history, exploring key events from the sixteenth century Shi’itization to modern-day tensions. We'll cover the Safavids, Afsharids, Qajars, and pivotal moments like the Constitutional Revolution, oil nationalization, and the Islamic revolution. Cultural elements, including Shi`ism, the Iranian film industry, and the role of the Supreme Leader, will be highlighted. We'll also discuss U.S.-Iran relations and examine power dynamics, wealth distribution, social status, and collective identity. Readings encompass both Iranian-authored and external sources, focusing on cultural and historical themes, such as power dynamics, wealth, and identity within religious and ethnic communities.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 863  Sufis: Mystics in Islam  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course offers a general and interpretive narrative tracing of Sufism from its period of origin until recent times. It observes the development and spread of the so-called “Islamic mysticism” through the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and ultimately Europe and the United States. Moving beyond a focus on doctrines and practices, this course situates Sufism in its social, cultural and historical contexts. We will learn how Sufi holy personages gained followers, not only among tribesmen and peasants, but also emperors, merchants, and bureaucrats. We will then look at how such alliances made leading Sufis powerful even at the zenith of European imperialism and in today’s globalized world.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 980  Internship  (1-4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Prerequisite: permission and placement for departmental majors from the director of undergraduate studies. 2 or 4 points.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 981  Internship  (2-4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Prerequisite: permission and placement for departmental majors from the director of undergraduate studies. 2 or 4 points per term.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 997  Independent Study  (1-4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 1 to 4 points per term.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
MEIS-UA 998  Independent Study  (1-4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. 1 to 4 points per term.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
MEIS-UA 9102  Elementary Arabic II  (4 Credits)  
This course is a continuation of Elementary Arabic I, and following the communicative approach, it will make an extensive use of the four language skills: listening, reading, speaking, and writing. Likewise, it puts an emphasis on the cultural aspects of Arabic. The teacher will provide a constructive framework for the course and guidance to the students. The role of the students is instrumental in making this course a successful and enjoyable experience. Therefore, you must come always prepared to class, particularly by doing your homework and arriving on time to the class. This course involves full interaction in Arabic between students and the teacher, and speaking and writing assignments are more varied and more demanding than the assignments for Elementary Arabic I.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: (MEIS-UA 101 OR MEIS-UA 9101).  
MEIS-UA 9103  Intermediate Arabic I  (4 Credits)  
Based on students' previous knowledge of Arabic (the alphabet, phrase structure, basic nominal and verbal sentences, basic verbal tenses and some knowledge of cases and moods) the course will enhance students' vocabulary, proficiency in reading, writing, speaking and hearing the language, and make them familiar with various special morphological and syntactic structures (relative clauses, the comparative and superlative, patterns of broken plurals, diptotes and more).
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: (MEIS-UA 102 OR MEIS-UA 9102).  
MEIS-UA 9104  Intermediate Arabic II  (4 Credits)  
Based on students' previous knowledge of Arabic (the alphabet, phrase structure, basic nominal and verbal sentences, the sound verb and cases and moods) the course will enhance students' vocabulary, proficiency in reading, writing, speaking and hearing the language, with a focus on the comprehension of extended literary texts, and make them familiar with various special morphological and syntactic structures (irregular verbs, special adverbial constructions, rhetorical devices and colloquial expressions).
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 9150  Languages of Israel  (4 Credits)  
An introduction to the principal languages spoken in contemporary Israel (chiefly Hebrew and Arabic, but also English, Russian, and Amharic) and to social practices and state policies concerning their use. As part of the course students will learn the Hebrew and Arabic alphabets and the basics of the two languages' lexicons and grammatical structures, with a mind to exploring their common features. The course includes tours of Tel Aviv's multilingual "linguistic landscape," in which different languages are displayed in public spaces both separately and together.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 9691  What is Islam?  (4 Credits)  
This course explores the origins of Islam and the development of its rituals and doctrines to the 21st century. It assumes no previous background in Islamic studies. Students will learn about topics such as the Koran and the Prophet, Islamic law, the encounter of East and West during the Crusades, and Islam in Britain. They will find out how Muslims in different regions have interpreted and lived their religion in past and present. Readings will include not only scholarly works but also material from primary sources, for example the Koran, biographies and chronicles. The course consists of a combination of lectures, seminar discussions, field trips and includes other media, such as film.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 9694  Islam and The West  (4 Credits)  
This course examines the relationship that developed between the Islamic world and the West and their historical impact on each other. The class surveys and analyses the historical relationship between these two regions from the rise of Islam through the early modern period and the advent of European colonialism to modern-day resurgence of traditional aspects of Islam. The course will focus on the Mediterranean as sphere of diplomatic, trade and cultural relations. Particular emphasis will be on periods that saw intensified interaction between the two civilizations. Examples of these are sessions on the Crusades in Syria, the westernisation-modernisation dilemma within the Ottoman reformist movement, the diplomatic battle fought on education between the Ottoman Sultan and the missionary schools, and the exchanges between European and Ottoman intellectuals towards the end of the 19th century.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 9707  Islam & Spain  (4 Credits)  
From the 8th century until the 17th century, Islam played a crucial role in the history of the Iberian Peninsula. Today this period is often portrayed as one of inter-religious harmony, while al-Andalus is simultaneously mourned in contemporary Islamist discourse as a lost paradise. While we look at the history of Al-Andalus and assess the importance of the contributions of Al-Andalus to Europe and America, we evaluate the significance of its legacy in modern Spain. Furthermore, we will study the protagonist role that Spain has played in relations between Europe and the Mediterranean Islamic countries during the Modern Age. Students will gain further understanding and contextualization of current Arab-Muslim geopolitics. As a case study, we will address the Spanish Protectorate in Morocco, as well as its ensuing process of decolonization and the consequences that shape the current international relations between the two neighboring countries, Spain and Morocco.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
MEIS-UA 9751  Topics in Middle East Politics:  (4 Credits)  
The course description for this Topics in Middle East Politics course varies depending on the topic taught. Please view the course descriptions in the course notes section below.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No