Journalism (JOUR-UA)

JOUR-UA 21  Report New York  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Summer term  
A course for high school students in gathering and writing the news, including news evaluation, reporting and writing techniques, and specialized beats, with New York City, especially the East Village, as the lab. Designed to give the journalism student extensive practice. Covers how reporters are assigned stories, how stories are planned and written, and journalism ethics and responsibilities. Students report and write stories under newsroom conditions. Not open to undergraduates.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
JOUR-UA 25  Journalism Ideas & Practice  (2 Credits)  
This intensive, once-a-week course is designed for students with a serious interest in writing about movies for print and digital media. Students practice various forms of film journalism while developing a deeper understanding of the art form through screenings and close readings of works by Brooks Barnes, Pauline Kael, Peter Bogdanovich, Ellen Willis, James Baldwin and Francois Truffaut. Planned class trips include a major film festival and a tour of the Criterion Collection, a film company specializing in art-house cinema. In addition to discussing individual films and film movements, we will cover essential journalism skills, with guest speakers offering guidance on specific topics like reporting and interviewing techniques. Classwork will include writing exercises, presentations and workshops. By the end of the course, students will have raised their cinema I.Q. and written a variety of film articles that inform and engage.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
JOUR-UA 50  Investigating Journalism  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
"Prerequisite: completion of the College’s expository writing requirement. Introductory lecture course required for the journalism major. Counts as an elective for both journalism minors. An introduction to issues in journalistic writing and reporting, such as the choices journalists face in method, style, and form; the political impact of the news media; questions of sensationalism, bias, and diversity, and the current digital upheaval. Students are also introduced to a selection of outstanding journalism.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
JOUR-UA 101  Journalistic Inquiry: The Written Word  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
Prerequisite: completion of the College’s expository writing requirement. Introductory skills course required for the journalism major and both journalism minors. Reporting- and writing-based. Emphasizes in-depth research techniques and exposure to many journalistic forms, including news writing, magazine and feature article writing, reported essays, and commentary for both print and online, and what distinguishes one form from the other. Issues of ethical conduct, bias, and fairness.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
JOUR-UA 102  Journalistic Inquiry: Multimedia  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
This is one of two required reporting classes. Students will learn how to report news and features stories using photographs, video and audio, with the emphasis on story-telling techniques. The course will cover how to develop ideas, reporting techniques using audio and video (including how they differ from written pieces), scripting, audio and visual digital editing, and broadcast story-telling structures.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: JOUR-UA 101.  
JOUR-UA 201  The Beat:  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer terms  
This course is designed to hone the student journalist?s ability to research and report deeply and to be able to imagine and develop fresh ideas, test their ideas with the strength of their reporting and research, and then present them in story form.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
JOUR-UA 202  Methods and Practice:  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered all terms  
Prerequisite: Journalistic Inquiry: The Written Word (JOUR-UA 101), or permission of the instructor. Counts as an elective for the journalism major and both journalism minors. Deeper experimentation with journalistic skills, from podcasting to blogging, both print and broadcast. Offerings include: Point of View; Audio Storytelling; and Writing for Reporters. Topics vary by semester.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
Prerequisites: JOUR-UA 101.  
JOUR-UA 203  Methods & Practice:  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer terms  
Prerequisite: None. Counts as an elective for the journalism major and both journalism minors. Topics vary by semester. Offerings include Photojournalism and Opinion and Advocacy Video.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
Prerequisites: JOUR-UA 101.  
JOUR-UA 351  Honors: Adv Reporting  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall  
Prerequisite: The Beat (JOUR-UA 201). Open to juniors and seniors with a 3.65 overall GPA and a 3.65 GPA in the journalism major. Offered in the fall. Requires deeper reporting and more polished writing or video work than non-honors sections. Student build a portfolio of two or three high-quality pieces (1,200 to 1,500 words, or videos of two to three minutes) and do significant preliminary reporting and research necessary for completion of the capstone project.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
Prerequisites: JOUR-UA 50 AND JOUR-UA 101 AND JOUR-UA 201 AND Restriction: (Academic Level = Senior OR Academic Plan = Journalism-CERT OR Journalism-MA OR Journalism-BA).  
JOUR-UA 352  Honors Senior Seminar  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
The following semester, honors students are required to take a specially designed honors senior seminar, which culminates in each student?s writing a large (6,000-10,000 word/15-20 minutes for broadcast) feature, completing the capstone. The student has to defend his/her work orally before at least two members of the faculty and perhaps a member of the profession.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: JOUR-UA 351.  
JOUR-UA 401  Senior Seminar:  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
An elective for students who wish to explore concentrated issues such as sex and American politics, literary nonfiction, and photojournalism and war. Each section concentrates on a different topic chosen by the instructor, a member of the full-time faculty. Such offerings include Ethnography for Journalists; The Art of Opinion Writing and Polemic; and The Journalism of Empathy.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
JOUR-UA 502  Journalism Ethics & First Amendment Law  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
This 14-week class is divided equally between ethics and the law. Through the weekly lecture and assigned readings, students are exposed to the various ethical and legal issues surrounding the field of journalism and come away with a clear sense of the role of the journalist in society and the issues that affect that mission today.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: JOUR-UA 50.  
JOUR-UA 503  Journalism and Society:  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer terms  
Prerequisite: None. Counts as an elective for the journalism major and both journalism minors. Offerings include: Women and the Media; Minorities in the Media; Covering the Earth; and Sports and Society. Topics vary by semester.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
JOUR-UA 504  Journalism as Lit:  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer terms  
Prerequisite: None unless indicated. Counts as an elective for the journalism major and both journalism minors. Offerings include: History and the Novel; Storied New York; Journalism and the American Road; and History and the Novel. Topics and prerequisites vary by semester.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
JOUR-UA 505  Issues and Ideas:  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer terms  
Prerequisite: Journalistic Inquiry: The Written Word (JOUR-UA 101), or permission of the instructor. Counts as an elective for the journalism major and both journalism minors. New controversies and ideas. Offerings include: Covering the Middle East; Covering Sub-Saharan Africa; and Race & Gender.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
Prerequisites: JOUR-UA 101.  
JOUR-UA 980  Internship  (1-4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer terms  
Requires permission of the department.
Grading: CAS Pass/Fail  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
JOUR-UA 997  Advanced Individualized Studies  (1-4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall, Spring, and Summer terms  
Requires permission of the department.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
JOUR-UA 9202  Methods & Practice:  (4 Credits)  
The course description for this Topics in Journalism course varies depending on the topic taught. Please view the course descriptions in the course notes section below.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
JOUR-UA 9204  Elective Reporting Tpcs:  (4 Credits)  
The course description for this Topics in Journalism course varies depending on the topic taught. Please view the course descriptions in the course notes section below.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
JOUR-UA 9302  Production & Publication  (4 Credits)  
The course focuses on combining the creative techniques of fiction with the rigor of journalistic travel writing to produce stories about Prague (not only) that move beyond the constraints of the news and feature story: stories that engage, resonate with readers, provide insight – stories which “produce the emotion”. The course proceeds by the reading and analysis of important contemporary journalism and classic travel pieces: examination of the narrative; fictional and literary devices used in travel writing; examination of and practice with various information gathering strategies; humor; point of view; unique voice. Distinguished Czech travel writers/journalists/photographers will be invited as guest lecturers.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
JOUR-UA 9502  Journalism Ethics & First Amendment Law  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
This course is an introduction to how American constitutional law affects journalists and why that matters. It’s also a course about journalistic ethics and how such professional notions as fairness, objectivity, responsibility, and credibility intersect with law – and how they don’t. Other journalism coursework is about how journalists do things – how to report, write, edit; this course will often be about how they avoid problems. We will cover the law of the First Amendment, the values our system places on free expression, the imprecision of legal principles and the problem this poses for journalists (and their lawyers), the changing nature of journalism and the changing nature of law in the digital age. This is not a law course as such, but a survey of the protections and restrictions that the legal system places on journalists. And we will be mindful that legal constraints alone do not govern how a good journalist behaves. Careful and honorable and valuable journalism comes not only from mere compliance with civil and criminal requirements, but attention to ethical principles that transcend law or are outside its boundaries.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
JOUR-UA 9503  Journalism & Society:  (4 Credits)  
The course description for this Topics in Journalism course varies depending on the topic taught. Please view the course descriptions in the course notes section below.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
JOUR-UA 9505  Issues & Ideas:  (4 Credits)  
This course aims to bring together diverse issues and perspectives in the rapidly evolving and changing area of international/global communication. Through a historical perspective, a framework will be established for the appreciation of the development of the immense scope, disparity, and complexity of this rapidly evolving field. Students will be encouraged to critically assess shifts in national, regional, and international media patterns of production, distribution, and consumption over time, leading to a critical analysis of the tumultuous contemporary global communication environment. Essential concepts of international communication will be examined, including trends in national and global media consolidation, cultural implications of globalization, international broadcasting, information flows, international communication law and regulation, and trends in communication and information technologies. The focus of the course will be international, with attention being paid both to Western-based multimedia conglomerates, as well as to the increasing global prominence of media corporations based in other regions, contributing to the reversal of international media flows and challenging the global hegemony of the Western media producers. Particular emphasis will be on the Czech Republic, as an empirical example of a national media system affected by global media flows.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No