Expository Writing (EXPOS-UA)

EXPOS-UA 1  Writing as Inquiry:  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
This foundational writing course is required for CAS, Nursing, Social Work, Steinhardt and Tandon incoming undergraduates. "Writing the Essay'' provides instruction and practice in critical reading, creative and logical thinking, and clear, persuasive writing. Students learn to analyze and interpret written texts, to use texts as evidence, to develop ideas, and to write exploratory and argumentative essays. Exploration, inquiry, reflection, analysis, revision, and collaborative learning are emphasized.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
EXPOS-UA 2  THE ADVANCED COLLEGE ESSAY  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
The course follows Writing the Essay (EW 1013) and provides advanced instruction in analyzing and interpreting written texts from a variety of academic disciplines, using written texts as evidence, developing ideas, and writing argumentative essays. It stresses analysis, argument, reflection, revision, and collaborative learning. | Prerequisite(s): EW 1013
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: EXPOS-UA 1 OR Poly Plcmt HU Place = 1013 OR Poly Plcmt HU Place = 1 OR EXPOS-UA 13.  
EXPOS-UA 3  International Writing Workshop Introduction  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Entrance by placement test only. Cannot substitute for EXPOS-UA 4 and/or EXPOS-UA 9. Intended for students who need additional preparation before entering International Writing Workshop I and II. Workshops help students develop their ability to summarize, discuss, analyze, and comment on their reading. Students read authentic nonfiction materials from newspapers, magazines, and books, and write critical essays. Courses provide help in grammar and editing.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
EXPOS-UA 4  International Writing Workshop I  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
The first of two courses for students for whom English is a second language. The CORE Requirement for NYU undergraduates is fulfilled with this course and International Writing Workshop II. Provides instruction in critical reading, textual analysis, exploration of experience, the development of ideas, and revision. Stresses the importance of inquiry and reflection in the use of texts and experience as evidence for essays. Reading and writing assignments lead to essays in which students analyze and raise questions about written texts and experience, and reflect upon text, experience, and idea in a collaborative learning environment. Discusses appropriate conventions in English grammar and style as part of instructor feedback. To contact EWP or view syllabi visit our website: http://www.nyu.edu/cas/ewp/index.html
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
EXPOS-UA 5  Writing the Essay: Art in the World  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This required course for all students in the Tisch School of the Arts is designed to engage all Tisch School of the Arts freshmen in a broad interdisciplinary investigation across artistic media. It provides instruction and practice in critical reading, creative thinking, and essay writing. Students learn to analyze and interpret written texts, art objects, and performances; to use written, visual, and performance texts as evidence; and to develop ideas. The course stresses exploration, inquiry, reflection, analysis, revision, and collaborative learning. Students are NOT permitted to add or switch sections after the first week of classes without EWP permission.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
EXPOS-UA 9  International Writing Workshop II  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Fall and Spring  
The second of two courses for students for whom English is a second language. The CORE requirement for NYU undergraduates is fulfilled with this course and International Writing Workshop 1. Provides advanced instruction in analyzing and interpreting written texts from a variety of academic disciplines, the use of written texts as evidence, the development of ideas, and the writing of argumentative essays through a process of inquiry and reflection. Stresses analysis, revision, inquiry, and collaborative learning. Discusses appropriate conventions in English grammar and style as part of instructor feedback. To contact EWP or view syllabi visit our website: http://www.nyu.edu/cas/ewp/index.html
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
EXPOS-UA 10  Intersections: Writing for Scholarly Publics  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Students of diverse academic interests engage in interdisciplinary conversations about scholarly questions relevant to a larger public. Students will conduct research and write with attention to their audience, starting with the community of the seminar and ambitiously imagining a wider scholarly public through omnivorous research and reading, investigating principles of disciplinarily and the innovative potential of interdisciplinary research, thinking, and discovery. While studying the work of public scholars, students will learn advanced writing techniques that draw on independent research. The course emphasizes intersections of disciplines, discourses, and rhetorics in order to inspire final essays that demonstrate cross-disciplinary awareness and innovation.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
EXPOS-UA 11  Writing toward Linguistic Justice  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
Immerses students in debates over conceptions of voice in the field of writing studies. Starting with the controversial 1974 resolution on “Students’ Rights to Their Own Language,” the course uses case studies to explore four questions: What is writing? What does writing do? How do writers write? What rules must writers follow and why? By studying these questions, students will expand their rhetorical repertoires and develop critical awareness of how conceptions of language, writing, and voice contribute to patterns of discursive privilege and disadvantage. They will use their emerging understandings to analyze contemporary public debates.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
EXPOS-UA 12  Thesis Writing in the Humanities and Social Sciences  (2 Credits)  
This course focuses on the final stages of thesis writing for seniors in the social sciences and humanities in a multidisciplinary space, offering students new opportunities for refining their research and scholarship across department boundaries. In our seminar, students will build on the work in their department-specific thesis courses to hone rhetorical strategies essential to long-form academic writing and research, including refining their work with primary and empirical sources, marshaling theoretical frameworks as part of their inquiry, effectively engaging structure in the formulation of a progressively developing argument, and honing audience awareness as they carve out their contribution to the scholarship. A multidisciplinary approach refines students’ awareness of their own field’s conventions and rhetorical strategies, yielding insights into how disciplines shape the production of knowledge. This course also helps students adapt their work into publications or conference papers, so their thesis can contribute to scholarly and public conversations.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
EXPOS-UA 13  Writing Tutorial  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Offers intensive individual and group work in the practice of expository writing for those students whose competency examination reveals the need for additional, foundational writing instruction. The course aims to better prepare admitted transfer students for the rigorous work they will have to complete in either Writing the Essay or an International Writing Workshop. The course concentrates on foundational work (grammar, syntax, paragraph development) leading to the creation of compelling essays (idea conception and development, effective use of evidence, understanding basic forms, and the art of persuasion). Passing this course with a C or better fulfills the Proficiency Exam requirement. To contact EWP or view syllabi visit our website: http://www.nyu.edu/cas/ewp/index.html
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
EXPOS-UA 15  A Spectrum of Essays  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Provides advanced instruction in essay writing. Emphasizes the development of analytical, reflective, and imaginative skills that lead to accomplished essays in any academic discipline. Stresses curiosity and investigates the relationship in a written text between empirical evidence and thoughtfulness, inquiry and judgment, and exploration and decisiveness. To see content for this course, please look in the notes section above. This course may be taken more than once, since its content changes each spring.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: Yes  
Prerequisites: EXPOS-UA 1.  
EXPOS-UA 16  Advanced Essay Writing for Science  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This advanced writing course is designed for science and pre-health students to build their ability to read and summarize research papers, write grant proposals, understand how writing is used within their discipline, develop their multimodal science communication skills, and to further reflect in writing on their motivations to pursue a career in science or medicine.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
EXPOS-UA 17  Writing in Community  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
Writing in Community is a course for students who are passionate about writing and community service and would like to explore the dynamic relationship between these two pursuits. As a team, we will head off campus each week to mentor under-served high school students in essay writing. Back on campus, we will have weekly meetings to help us enhance our writing and mentoring skills as we develop our own ideas into essays. We will study writers, artists, and filmmakers whose service and/or community engagement has become a basis for work that documents and reflects on pressing social concerns. To contact EWP or view syllabi visit our website: http://www.nyu.edu/cas/ewp/index.html
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: EXPOS-UA 1 with a Minimum Grade of B.  
EXPOS-UA 18  Research, Writing, and Speaking in the Disciplines  (2 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
A course for students who want to better understand how the research they conduct in coursework for their majors relates to the communication of that research, whether in the mode of theses, research papers or reports, panel or poster presentations, or grant proposals. This class will explore how good research practices inform good critical writing, and vice-versa. Course materials are determined in part by the interests and academic concentrations of enrolled students as well as research writing guides and foundational works on research history. While we will explore important academic forms, such as Literature Reviews, Annotated Bibliographies, Empirical Reports, Theses, and Grant Proposals, special attention will be given to underlying skills, such as articulating research problems, formulating thoughtful interpretive arguments, and situating one's project in context of the current literature. Students awarded—or planning to seek—a Dean's Undergraduate Research Fund (DURF) grant or who will be presenting in the CAS Undergraduate Research Conference are especially encouraged to enroll.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: (EXPOS-UA 1 OR EXPOS-UA 4).  
EXPOS-UA 19  Thinking across the University  (1-2 Credits)  
Thinking Across the University (TATU) introduces first-generation college students to the university through the lens of academic disciplines while interrogating the distinctive ways each values and produces knowledge. The course aims to contextualize and demystify these implicit values and beliefs by examining the epistemological premises of academic disciplines. The course considers inequality by pairing fundamental texts with contemporary scholars, drawing frequently from NYU’s faculty. Students will compare diverse methodological and disciplinary approaches to better understand how knowledge is shaped by cultural and historical conventions. Students will learn how scholarship emerges from structural inequities and see how scholarship reshapes our ways of thinking about inequality.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
EXPOS-UA 22  Advanced Writing for Engineers  (4 Credits)  
"Advanced Writing for Engineers (AWE) is designed to help you build on and apply what you've learned in Writing the Essay to your future path. Like Writing the Essay, AWE is a participatory writing seminar that centers on discussion, revision, and reflection. Each AWE theme includes at least one essay assignment and emphasizes research skills, ethical source-use, and multimodal communication. Further, in AWE, you will practice the kinds of writing and communication that STEM professionals use in upper-level courses and in their careers, such as proposals, business plans, and presentations. There is also a greater emphasis on teamwork and multimodal projects. Still, be advised that AWE is not a technical writing course: these assignments will require the same creativity, revision, and reflection as the essays you wrote in Writing the Essay. Prerequisite: EXPOS-UA 1 (Writing the Essay) or EXPOS-UA 4 (International Writing Workshop I, with EWP approval)."
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
Prerequisites: EXPOS-UA 1 or EXPOS-UA 4 and EXPOS-UA 9.  
EXPOS-UA 23  Advanced Writing for Engineers: Service  (4 Credits)  
Advanced Writing for Engineers: Service, which fulfills the second-semester writing requirement for Tandon students, is intended for students who want to tackle urgent problems in our local communities, putting their engineering and writing skills to practical use. Building on Writing the Essay, students will analyze and practice genres crucial for civic engagement, including memos, proposals and white papers/policy briefs. In a team project, students will create a poster presentation presenting solutions to stakeholders such as New York-based nonprofits and community boards. Working independently and collaboratively, students will develop their academic and professional skills, including clear writing, strategic research, audience awareness, analysis, critical thinking, reflection, revision, teamwork, and peer review.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
EXPOS-UA 24  Advanced Writing for Engineers: Entrepreneurship  (4 Credits)  
Advanced Writing for Engineers: Entrepreneurship, which fulfills the second-semester writing requirement for Tandon students, is intended for students interested in business. Building on Writing the Essay, students will analyze and practice genres central to entrepreneurship and business school, such as case study essays, presentations and pitches. Working in teams, students will conduct research to determine whether a market opportunity can be turned into venture. In an independent final assignment, students will reflect on their goals, creating material that can be used for cover letters and application essays. The course encourages students to develop their academic and professional skills including clear writing, strategic research, audience awareness, analysis, critical thinking, reflection, revision, teamwork, and peer review.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
EXPOS-UA 30  College Writing Workshop  (0 Credits)  
Typically offered occasionally  
This course is only open to students registered in the Precollege Program. As part of the NYU Precollege program, students are eligible to participate in the College Writing Workshop. This is an ungraded, noncredit course, but regular attendance is mandatory to pass the class. The workshop meets twice a week for five weeks, morning or afternoon, on a Monday-Wednesday or Tuesday-Thursday schedule. Through the workshop process, students learn to become better critical readers of others' writing as well as their own; they learn to envision and complete a complex intellectual task in writing, one that requires both intuition and hard work, inspiration and revision; and they learn to attend to style in their writing as more than mere decoration. In the essay students write, they will be required to borrow an idea from one of six essays written by professional essayists and to deepen the readers’ understanding of that idea by using two other essays and selected moments from experience. In doing this work students will learn to analyze written texts as sources of idea. In addition, they will learn to select and incorporate evidence from other written and visual texts to deepen the borrowed idea. As they do this work, they will practice the art of thoughtful reflection as they come to understand the form and nature of essay.
Grading: CAS Pass/Fail  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
EXPOS-UA 100  Topics in Expository Writing  (4 Credits)  
Topics (and prerequisites, if any) vary by semester.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
EXPOS-UA 101  Topics in Expository Writing  (2 Credits)  
Topics (and prerequisites, if any) vary by semester.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No  
EXPOS-UA 9001  Writing the Essay  (4 Credits)  
Typically offered Spring  
This foundational writing course is required for CAS, Stern, Nursing, Social Work, Steinhardt, and Tandon incoming undergraduates. Writing The Essay provides instruction and practice in critical reading, creative and logical thinking, and clear, persuasive writing. Students learn to analyze and interpret written texts, to use texts as evidence, to develop ideas, and to write exploratory and argumentative essays. Exploration, inquiry, reflection, analysis, revision, and collaborative learning are emphasized.
Grading: CAS Graded  
Repeatable for additional credit: No